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V 



H. M. BLAIR. Editor. I 
W. L. SHERRILL, Assistant. I 



ESTABLISHED 1855. 



ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE OF THE ML E. CHURCH, 2* 

^ . 



$1.50 PER ANNUM- 
I In Advance.; 



GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY 7, 1909. VOL. LIV.--NO. 1 







BROAD STREET METHODIST CHURCH 

STATESVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

Rev. Harold Turner, Pastor 

This church was projected by Rev. H. K. Boyer in r905. 
Estimated cost about $45,000 




NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 7, 1909. 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 



Entered according to the Postal Laws and Regula- 
tions in the Post Office in Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year $1.50 

Six Months 75 

To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.00 a year. 

Office: 110 East Gaston Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

This paper will be continued to subscribers at 
the expiration of the time paid for unless the office 
is notified to the contrary. Watch your label, and 
unless you intend to pay for the paper, do not allow 
it to be delivered to you over the time. If you wish 
your paper discontinued, notify us by postal card. 



EDITORIAL. 

THE STATE LEGISLATURE. 

This body will meet on Wednesday of this week. 
There seems to be no expectation of sensational 
or reactionary legislation. The body is composed 
largely of substantial and conservative men. Many 
of the members are men of experience in former 
sessions, and withal it is a reasonable expectation 
that the best interests of the State will be care- 
fully guarded and promoted by this body. 

The best and most patriotic people of the State 
are jealously concerned for the safeguarding of 
the prohibition law which has just gone into ef- 
fect, and we believe the present, legislature will 
be disposed to do all that is necessary to give the 
law a fair chance for enforcement. If there is 
anything lacking in the provision for enforcement 
of the law there should be amendments that will 
provide . for this. No law can be fairly tested that 
has not adequate provision for enforcement, and 
we trust the present legislature to act without 
hesitation in providing for the enforcement of a 
law endorsed by the people of the state by the 
decisive majority of more than 40,000 votes. 



A HEROIC ENGINEER. 

Southern Railway passenger train No. 35 speed- 
ing southward last Tuesday evening, December 
29th, was wrecked at Stokesland, a small station 
six miles south of Danville, and the engineer Mr. 
A. P. Satterfleld, of Spencer, was instantly killed 
and several "of the train force injured, though not 
seriously. We understand that the engineer could 
have jumped from the cab and saved his life but if 
he had the lives of all the passengers aboard the 
train would have been jeopardized. He was a hero 
and died like a brave man to save the lives of 
those committed to his care. 

In this world of toil and service the man who 
does well his work, who conscientiously and in 
the fear of God approaches and carries out his 
every task, be it work which seems small or great, 
is doing that which God takes knowledge of and 
counts as great. The engineer holds one of the 
most dangerous and responsible positions, but 
we seldom think of the faith we place in the man 
at the helm when we board the train. We vir- 
tually commit our lives to his keeping for the 
time being, and the engineer as a rule is a faith- 
ful watchman and in time of peril usually demon- 
strates that our confidence was not misplaced. 
All honor to the faithful engineer. We feel al- 
ways when we see him in the cab like lifting the 
hat to him. 

When on duty he is generally all blackened and 
begrimed, with his hand on the throttle, and his 
gaze -fixed on the track, but underneath the over- 
alls is a heart weighted with the care of heavy re- 
sponsibility, for he feels and knows that human 
life depends upon his faithfulness. The engineer 
who died the other day proved himself a hero, for 
he gave his life to duty. What man can do more 
than that? 

"The sweetest lives are those to duty wed, 
Whose deeds, both great and small, 

Are close-knit strands of an unbroken thread, 
Where love ennobles all. 

The world may sound no trumpet, ring no bells, 

The Book of Life the shining record tells." 



THE NEW YEAR. 

Since our last issue we have crossed the line 
which separates the calendar year, and 190S has 
given way to the year 1909. Such lines of separa- 
tion do not exist in fact, but serve the good pur- 
pose of reminding us in some systematic way of 
the flight of time. In a true sense every day is 



a new day, and ushers in a new year, the year 
being only a group of three hundred and sixty-five 

days. 

There is some advantage in what has grown to 
be a custom of making the first of each year a 
time of reckoning — a time for the tak- 
ing of the inventory of stock, and making 
up of the balance sheet — so that we may 
know something definite as to the result 
of the business of the past year. If, when 
the inventory is complete, we find the balance on 
the wrong side of the ledger, the only thing for us 
lo do is to go out of the business, or find out some 
.method by which the business can be made profita- 
ble. 

Th? life of every man is projected upon the idea 
of profit and loss. The Savior recognizing this, 
challenges every one with the question, "What 
shall it profit a man if he shall gain the whole 
world and lose his own soul?" The fact is every 
man is face to face with this question, and there 
).-> no evading the matter. All our plans for the 
year affect the question of personal salvation, and 
if in summing up for the past year, we find that 
the matter of personal salvation has not been pro- 
moted, we should at once change our plans and 
see to it that we carry nothing over into the new 
year that will hinder our progress in the divine 
life. 

We have one suggestion for the program of the 
new year which we feel disposed to emphasize. 
This suggestion is one which appeals to every one 
as practical. It is that we resolve to live, day by 
day. If we see to it that each day is lived by the 
rule of conscience enlightened by God's word, we 
can rely upon the result in the aggregate being 
such as we will not have to contemplate with re- 
gret. Otherwise, we cannot be sure of this. Let 
us take care of eaech day, and the year will be 
sure to take care of itself. 



THE ITALIAN EARTHQUAKE. 

The most appalling calamity of the past two 
hundred years, or perhaps in all of modern his- 
tory, is the destruction of great multitudes by the 
earthquake which convulsed southern Italy on 
Tuesday of last week. The descriptioH given of 
the terrible shock, as reported in the secular press 
is heartrending in the extreme. Of the 90,000 in- 
habitants in Messina it Is believed that fully 70,- 
000 have perished, leaving of course the remain- 
ing 20,000 in great distress and need. 

The sympathy of all lands is expressed for the 
unfortunates, and voluntary gifts for their relief 
are being made all over the world. Fully a mil- 
lion dollars has been given already by American 
citizens, and it is thought that the donations of 
our people will finally reach several millions and 
the generosity of the whole world is being shown. 
As soon as the horrible news reached our govern- 
ment the steamer Celtic was loaded with supplies 
for the relief of the suffering, and as these lines 
are being written, that great vessel is hurrying 
over the seas laden with food and clothing for 
the needy. The Italian colonies in this country 
are overcome with grief and fear on account of 
the destruction of their people in the old land. 

Such convulsion^ . teach " us of the weakness of 
mail and the transitory condition of all things 
earthly, and of the dependence of weak mortals 
in the midst of great danger, and that if we would 
be indeed secure we must rest our faith upon the 
mighty God who holds all worlds in the hollow of 
his hand. When volcanic eruptions and earth- 
quakes, and great oods and storms and fires 
break ruthlessly into all the works and plans of 
man and carry into eternity large bodies of peo- 
ple, v. e can but stand in helplessness in its pres- 
ence and call upon the Lord of hosts for protec- 
tion. 

Such calamities teach us another lesson — that 
while men in their greed for gain and promotion 
may struggle hard to overcome each other and 
outwardly seem to care not for each other, 
misfortune makes us ' halt and meditate and show 
love and mercy. 

Great as this catastrophe is it gives the world 
a chance to see that the milk of human kindness 
still remains in humanity's heart, and that when 
it is needed, is soon expressed in practical service. 
The people of Greensboro are giving for the re- 
lief of the sufferers and the Advocate will gladly 
receive and forward contributions as they may 
be sent" in for that cause. 



THE LAYMEN'S MOVEMENT. 

A meeting of .the laymen of the Greensboro dis- 
trict was held in West Market Street Church last 



Tuesday and a goodly number of the brethren 
from the various charges were in attendance, and 
the necessities within the district were generally 
discussed and plans suggested to meet all the de- 
mands laid upon the church. Mr. W. B. Stubbs, 
Secretary of the Laymen's Movement, of the M. 
E. Church, South, was present at the afternoon 
service and offered helpful advice and at night de- 
livered a very strong speech setting forth the gen- 
eral purpose of the laymen's work and ways and 
means whereby it may be furthered, and that each 
congregation select a lay leader whose work it 
shall be in co-operation with pa.;tor to develop 
the latent force of the church, putting it to work 
to secure the goal of three million dollars a year 
in Southern Methodism that our. people may do 
their full part in evangelizing the world in this 
generation. 

He argued, and with great force, that if the 
church at home is aroused to the point of sacri- 
fice to save the world that lieth in wickedness, 
and give freely to that work, every interest 
of the church will be quickened and receive from 
the people a far more generous support. 

It is evident "that the more we give the more 
we have," on the principle that the more any fac- 
ulty or talent is exercised the more active it be- 
comes. His address made a profound impression 
and we feel sure will bear good fruit. 



DEATH OF REV. J. S. NELSON. 

The death of the Rev. Jesse S. Nelson, which oc- 
curred at his home in Charlotte on Tuesday, Dec- 
ember 29, was not a surprise to those acquainted 
with his condition, for he had been extremely fee- 
ble for several months, but his death carries sor- 
row to many hearts throughout our section for 
he was held in very affectionate regard by those 
who knew him well. 

He had labored long and successfully as a min- 
ister of Christ, having joined the South Carolina 
Conference at Charleston in 1851, and was con- 
stant in serving circuits, stations, and districts un- 
til 1904, at the Charlotte Conference, he was su- 
perannuated. Since that time he has lived in 
Charlotte. 

Brother Nelson was possessed of a strong mind 
and extraordinary force of character. He had 
great faith, strong convictions and undaunted 
courage. Men always knew his position on all 
questions and he could give a reason for his faith. 
He had in him the stuff of which martyrs are 
made, and would rather die than renounce what 
he thought was right. As a preacher he pro- 
claimed a full gospel. The terrors of the law 
wore not withheld, but he applied the remedy for 
sin in such a way that many were led to Jesus 
through his ministry. 

When the end came it was peace to him and 
he has entered upon that rest which God has prom- 
ised to the faithful. To the grief- 
stricken wife and children we extend warm Chris- 
tian sympathy, and pray that the Savior to whom 
he so often pointed sorrowing souls, may be their 
comfort and solace. 

We hope soon to publish a full and carefully 
prepared memoir of this good man. 



DEATH OF MR,S. C. H. CAVINESS. 

Mrs. C. H. Caviness, the wife of Rev. C. H. Cav- 
iness, died at McAdenville, N. C, December 23, 
190S, after an illness of about three weeks. She 
was born in Chatham county, N. C, March 25th, 
1S70, professed religion and joined the Christian 
Church at Pleasant Grove early in life, was mar- 
ried to Rev. C. H. Caviness, of the Western North 
Carolina Conference, November 20, 1S95; and 
from this time to the day cf her death she was 
a faithful member of the M. E. Church, South. 

She shared cheerfully with her husband the joys 
and sorrows of the itineracy, made bright and hap- 
py their parsonage home, was a devoted mother 
and a helpmeet indeed to her husband. He and 
their four little children will greatly miss her, but 
they know where to find her. She lived well and 
triumphantly. 

The day after Christmas she was laid to rest 
by the side of her mother and father, Alex. Wilkie 
and Cary Leonard. The writer, assisted by Revs. 
J. E. Woosley and — . Craven, conducted the ser- 
vices in presence of a large congregation of sympa- 
thetic friends and kindred. To them, the grief- 
stricken husband and motherless children, we 
commend to the grace of God and comfort of the 
blessed Holy Spirit. 

W. R. WARE. 



January 7, 1909. 



NOftTIt CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



t. 



NOTES AND PERSONALS. 



— Rev. R. C. Kirk, with the consent of Bishop 
Atkins, has been appointed to Haywood circuit. 

— Rev. E. J. Poe, of the Lilesville circuit, writes 
a pleasant note about the pleasant beginning of 
another conference year on his charge. 

— -Mr. C. M. Hickerson, vice-president of the 
Commercial National Bank, of this city, was mar- 
ried on December 24th, 1908, to Miss Lula, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Nathan H. Gwyn, of Lenoir. 

— Rev. R. M. Hoyle, presiding elder of the Mor- 
ganton district, has decided to live in Morganton, 
so that his friends will take notice that his post- 
office is changed from Marion to Morganton. 

— The last issue of the Concord Times contains 
a long and newsy letter from Rev. J. A. B. Fry, 
a former pastor for four years of Central church, 
Concord, but now stationed at Berkeley, Cali. It 
is a message that will be read with interest by 
his old friends and parishioners of Concord, to 
whom it was written. 

— We were glad to receive calls from Rev. H. 
C. Byrum, of Kernersville, Rev. C. A. Wood, of 
Asheboro, Rev. A. L. Aycock and Brother P. H. 
Williamson, of Reidsville, last week. These breth- 
ren were in attendance upon the Laymen's con- 
ference, which was held in West Market Street 
church on Tuesday, December 28. 

— Mrs. Sophia Bulla died some days ago at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. Nannie Craven, at 
Trinity. She had lived to a ripe old age and was 
a devout, good woman, whose death brings sor- 
row to the hearts of many who knew her and ap- 
preciated her sterling worth and character. She 
was the widow of the late Mr. J. R. Bulla, who 
was a lawyer of first rate ability and one time so- 
licitor of this judicial district, and the grandmother 
of Rev. J. B. Craven, of our conference. 

— Mrs. C. H. Caviness, wife of Rev. C. H. Cavi- 
ness, our pastor at McAdenville, died at their par- 
sonage home on Wednesday, December 23d, af- 
ter a short illness. Mrs. Caviness was a woman 
of superior traits of character and a. genuine help- 
meet to her husband in his responsible work. She 
was a sister of Mr. R. H. Leonard, of Mt. Airy, 
and Mr. W. H. Leonard, of Salisbury. The body 
was taken to the old home in Randolph county 
on Christmas day for burial, and the funeral was 
conducted by Rev. W. R. Ware, assisted by Rev. 
J. E. Woosley, of Ramseur. Mrs. Caviness was 
a good woman, faithful as a wife, mother, friend, 
She leaves a husband and four children in loneli- 
ness and grief. The stricken husband, children, 
and other relatives have our genuine sympathy. 



OUR BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT FUND. 



Previously reported $2,345.58 

Rev. J. F. Kirk, Mocksville 5.00 

George P. Phillips, Greensboro 5.00 

Pisgah church, Summerfield circuit 5.00 



Total $2,365.58 



Let those who have made pledges send in the 
amounts at once. Statements have been mailed 
during the last month, and we sincerely hope it 
will not be necessary to send them again. 



BREVARD REPORT. 

Previously reported $ 73.85 

Mrs. R. A. Smith, thro. Balsam W. H. M. S., 1.00 

Windsor H. M. S., through N. C. Conf 13.00 

Mt. Airy H. M. S. for Christmas present.... 1.00 

Mrs. Hoyle Howell, Greensboro 1.00 

Mr. J. O. Erwin, Lenoir 1.00 

A Friend, Ashboro 2.00 



Total $102.35 



Since my last report, when I asked for $75.00 
more, you see I have received but little more than 
one-third needed. Please be prompt, friends, and 
let me hear from you with large or small contri- 
butions. Yours for service, 

MRS. F. E.'ROSS, Treas. 

Greensboro, N. C, Jan. 4, 1909. 



WESTERN N. C. CONFERENCE BROTHER- 
HOOD. 

It seems as if the time has come for action, and 
quickly, if we are to aid in caring for our elderly 
brethren, and superannuates, as well as those who 
are dependent upon limited salaries. You have 
been informed of the action of the Methodist Ben- 
evolent Association, at Nashville, Tenn. The As- 
sociation finds it necessary, in order to win the 
younger men, to adopt a scale of rates according 
to age. This I opposed. It was not fair to our 



older members. It practically barred them from 
membership, and incurred a total loss of all they 
had paid into the association. But such is the 
history of all insurance companies — freeze out the 
old men, get in the young blood, and when they 
arrive at old age, it will be found necessary to 
change the rates again. I have canceled my mem- 
bership after having paid assessments to confer- 
ence brotherhoods for the past thirty years. While 
I am out, and have lost all that my diligence 
should have won for self, I am grateful for the 
fact that I have, for that number of years, assisted 
in helping numbers of widows and orphans of our 
translated brethren. I am still willing to continue 
in this good work. I regard it second to no other 
call upon the ministry. It seems that no move- 
ment upon the part of the church can run any 
length of time without doubling and trebling secre- 
taries and assistants, and wonderfully increasing 
the running expenses. 

Brethren are writing me inquiring, "What shall 
we do?" I reply, re-organize our Conference 
Brotherhood, and attend to our own affairs. Con- 
nectionalism is not worth a cent to us, but to the 
more fortunate ones. I am getting awfully wea- 
ried of being a "catspaw" for chestnuts. 

Why not try a new plan which will allow lay 
as well as clerical members to enjoy the benefits 
at the lowest possible cost? Something like this: 
Each clerical member to pay $2.00 on death of 
each clerical, and $1.00 on the death of each lay 
member. The same rate for lay members ($2.00 
on call for lay, and $1.00 on call for clerical). Each 
to pay $1.00 annually to meet all running ex- 
penses and to create a fund from which the assess- 
ment of a clerical member may be paid if other- 
wise his membership must lapse. Also $2.00 en- 
trance fee from every member to be put into this 
fund. This will permit every cent of the assess- 
ments to go to the beneficiary. All new members 
to present with their application a certificate from 
family physician as to their condition of health. 

If any one can propose a better plan let him 
present it now. I do not like to ask our laymen 
to join us and not share in benefits. To do so 
savors too much of mendicancy. 

Should this plan meet the approval of preachers 
and laymen, let them send in their names at once, 
and results will be reported in the Advocate. I 
feel sure we could work up members sufficient to 
pay $500.00 on each benefit certificate. 

Yours truly, 

H. F. CHREITZBERG. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOME. 

The work of the Children's Home at Winston, 
will be pushed with enthusiasm this year. Rev. 
J. P. Rodgers, the financial agent, appointed at 
the last session of our annual conference, will 
be in the field and present the cause to the various 
pastoral charges. He began the canvass at Mocks- 
ville, and secured $546.50, which amount will be 
augmented by the noble band of Methodists of 
that pleasant town.. 

Brother Rodgers went next to Norwood, where 
he presented the Orphanage claims, and secured 
the nice sum of $655.00; making a total of $1,- 
201.50. 

This is a fine beginning, and shows that the 
board of trustees made a wise choice in the selec- 
tion of Brother Rodgers. If other charges will re- 
spond with the same liberality, according to abili- 
ty, there will be no lack of funds to erect and 
equip all necessary buildings. Some of the larger 
stations should respond with thousands. At least 
a dozen charges should give $1,000 each, and sev- 
eral of them several thousand each. Every Meth- 
odist in the conference should become a contribu- 
tor this cause. Respectfully, 

N. R. RICHARDSON. 



A WORD FROM LEAKSVI LLE. 

If ever a Methodist preacher had cause to be 
thankful for his appointment, it is surely this writ- 
er, for truly the lines have fallen to him in pleas- 
ant places. We part from dear friends in one 
place, only to find that God has other, good and 
faithful followers in all parts, ready to receive His 
ministers. 

So it was on December 3, when we parted sorrow- 
fully from loved friends in Greensboro and came 
to Leaksville. We were met at the station by a 
detachment of the Women's societies, and by that 
loyal layman and preachers' friend, T. W. Field, 
who had a carriage ready to convey us to our new 
home. At the house (surely the most elegant 
parsonage we have seen for a number of years) a 
large assembly of elect ladies were ready with 



glad hands and hearty welcome, to receive the 
new arrivals, though they had scarcely got over 
their loss in the removal of the very popular Barn- 
hardt. Nor was it all hot air, for we found the 
larder stocked with good things, and toothsome 
dainties, and a tidy servant was in waiting whom 
they had engaged for some days to care for us. 
The hackneyed phrases about loyal Methodists 
are inadequate to express just what one finds at 
Leaksville. These people seemed to take us right 
into their hearts, and made us feel at home imme- 
diately. 

I did not rush into print at first, for I preferred 
to wait and see if perchance the first impressions 
might fade, but the glad hands don't tire, and the 
welcoming smiles "don't wash off." May God 
abundantly bless and reward these people for their 
hearty reception of a new preacher, and especially 
for their exceeding kindness to the preacher's in- 
valid wife. 

• A. T. BELL. 



CAMPAIGN FOR NEW SUBSCRIBERS. 



Charlotte District. 

Dil worth, Rev. A.- L. Coburn 1 

Total — 1 

Statesville District. 

Lenoir ct, Rev. J. O. Ervin 7 

Total ' — 7 

Waynesville District. 
Waynesville, Rev. J. H. Barnhardt... 1 

Jonathan circuit 8 

Total — 9 



Grand total 17 



Rev. J. O. Ervin, of Lenoir circuit, was the first 
to send in a batch of new subscribers, sending sev- 
en new subscribers and three renewals. This 
makes about forty new subscribers Brother Ervin 
has secured on that charge in less than six months 
and shows what can be done where the pastor is 
willing to take the matter up and make the effort. 
Brother Shelton, of the Bakers ville circuit, sends 
eleven new subscribers and renewals from his 
home church on the Jnnathan circuit, in Haywood 
county. A number of the pastors have asked for 
sample copies and we are supplying these, and 
fully expect to report large results in the near fu- 
ture. At least three of the presiding elders have 
taken the matter up systematically and we are 
counting on these districts coming up with the full 
quota in a short time. The presiding elder, more 
than any one else, has the opportunity to make our 
campaign succeed. 



THE ITINERARY OF REV. J .M. TERRELL, IN 
THE GREENSBORO DISTRICT, JAN- 
UARY 18-24. 

January 18. — South Main Street, High Point, 
7:30 p. m. 

January 18. — Asheboro station, 7:30 p. m. 
January 20. — Concord church, Uwharrie circuit, 
10:30 a. m. 

January 20. — Randleman and Naomi, 7:30 p. m. 

January 21. — Muir's Chapel, 11 a. m. 

January 21, Reidsville, 7:30 p. m. 

January 22. — Mt. Carmel, Ruffin circuit, 11 a. 

m. 

January 22 — Centenary, Greensboro, 7:30 p. m. 

January 23. — Rehobeth, Pleasant Garden circuit, 
10:30 a. m. 

January 23. — Cedar Falls, 7:30 p. m. 

January 24. — Franklinville, 11 a. m. 

January 24. — Ramseur, 7:30 p. irr. 

Brother Terrell is one the best and most effici- 
ent missionaries in Brazil. He has labored very 
successfully for several years in Porto Alegre, 
Brazil, whither he will return next June. We are 
exceedingly fortunate to have him in our district 
for a week. I bespeak for him a large and sym- 
pathetic, prayerful hearing at every one of the 
above named places. Let the pastors, lay lead- 
ers, stewards, missionary women, Leaguers, Sun- 
day school workers, and all do all they can to give 
Brother Terrell the best possible hearing at their 
respective churches and make his coming to them 
a great and good occasion. 

Sincerely yours, 

W. R. WARE, P. E. 



LAYMEN'S MEETING, SHELBY DISTRICT. 

Will you please announce that a Laymen's meet- 
ing for Shelby district will be held at Shelby in 
Connection with the district stewards' meeting, 
Wednesday January 13th. It is earnestly request- 
ed that all the lay leaders elected attend. 

J. S. MARTIN, President. 



4. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 7, 1909. 



Contributions. 



GEORGIA LETTER. 



By Rev. Geo. G. Smith. 



In a few days I will have ended my seventy-sec- 
ond year, and entered on my seventy-third. 
My father died at 73 and a little past; my grand- 
father at 75, and my call cannot be long delayed. 
I cannot walk and have much time for reading 
and meditation. Preachers in active work do not 
realize what a privilege it is to preach. I have 
no fancy for a hermit's cell, or a monastery. I 
found the joy of life in activity, but now that I 
am shut in, I am trying to make the most of it. 
To sit still and growl or whine is a poor business 
at best, and I have little call and less taste in 
that direction. The world has been good to me. 
I think I have had much more than I have de- 
served, and I shall not rail at it. As long as -I can 
write, I will keep my pen busy and it helps me 
perhaps even more to write, than it helps others 
to read what I have written. I wrote last about 
some things to put off. Religion, however, is not 
m< rely destructive, it is constructive. We have 
much to put on which we t did not bring with us 
into this world. 

Among the things which the apostle urges us 
to put on are "Bowels of mercies." Did any of 
your readers ever hear a sermon on mercy as a 
Christian virtue? I never did. Mercy is not love 
or brotherliness, and human kindness. It includes 
them all, but they do not include it. It is kind- 
ness to the guilty and undeserving. It has a vast 
sweep from mercy to the very criminals to mercy 
to the unworthy who are merely faulty. There is 
a great want of mercy oftentimes in speaking the 
truth. Words are things, and cruel words often 
inflict the keenest wounds. I do not know any 
people to whom this admonition to be merciful is 
more needed than to preachers. I was active in 
pulpit work for more than forty years. I preached 
a great many sermons, and heard very few. For 
the last ten years, I have heard many sermons and 
preached very few, and I find there is a great dif- 
ference. I have known some preachers who were 
incarnated "Ethics", and ethics of the highest, 
most sublimated kind. The poor, erring, defec- 
tive, hearer, striving, perhaps, as best he could 
with a corrupt nature found himself Sabbath af- 
ter Sabbath listening to harsh denunciation of 
his faults, and perhaps real transgressions. The 
parent whose children were wayward heard the 
the sternest denunciations of the failure of pa- 
rents to rule their families, and this sometimes from 
a man who had no family, or only little children. 
A poor fellow hopelessly in debt, heard stern 
stern words against not paying his creditors. The 
high tempered woman, who is having everything 
to vex her, heard only seven words against the 
evils of temper. Oh, if the preacher would re- 
member as God does that we are but dust, and 
say something tender, something helpful, and not 
stand so far off, but lend a helping hand! 

Some parents are really unmerciful to their chil- 
dren. It pains them so much to punish, so much 
to control, that to save themselves from pain, they 
suffer the child to go to destruction. They are 
sinfully indulgent, and count it loving to be so, 
and there are others who are absolutely cruel in 
their restrictions and censures. The old Puritan 
often drew his children away from the roof by 
his sternness, or what he called his Godly disci- 
pline. I knew an old man to send his little son 
late in the day to a town five miles away to get 
some articles. Among them was a pair of shoes. 
About dark on a cold, bleak day, the little fellow 
returned. He had brought all but one thing. He 
had left a pair of shoes on the counter. When 
the stern old father found he had come without 
them, he ordered the poor little half-frozen boy 
to ride the weary way back to get them. I have 
known a loving mother to say the harshest things 
to an erring, but not wicked, daughter, suggest- 
ing conduct the girl abhorred. I have known a 
wife to nag her husband till he was driven to the 
club and to ruin. I have known a father to be so 
so harsh and stern to his boy that the son looked 
on him as a cruel tyrant, and I have known what 
was even more cruel, a father to give the son such 
liberty that he fell into the wildest wickedness. 
I have, alas, known a husband to be so pitiless to 
his wife by his rebukes as to drive her to her 
grave. He did not intend to be, but he was. He 
was strong and she was weak", and he did not 
know that the faults he tried to correct were the 



results of weakness, and that patience and ten- 
derness would have helped the poor woman to 
have corrected them. 

We need to put on "Bowels of Mercies" toward 
the wayward. We are confronted with a new 
evil in the South, as an old one disappears. It was 
a sad fact in other years that purity was not look- 
ed for in servant maids. Despite all that could 
be done there was a general departure from its 
paths, but our poor white girls were the purest 
poor people in the world. With the changes 
wrought by emancipation and with the fact that 
legal penalties might follow the seduction of a 
negro, has led vile men to making victims of poor 
white girls whose fear of family shame would pro- 
tect against prosecution. Then there was such 
changes in business conditions that these poor 
girls are more exposed than they had ever been. 
Living in cabins in the country. Spinning and 
weaving and making their own clothes, knowing 
little of extravagance of dress and marrying early, 
they were largely protected from temptation, but 
now ever increasing numbers flock to towns and 
cities, and, alas, in largely increased numbers are 
victimized. Here is room for all the "Bowels of 
Mercies" we have. To rescue these perishing 
ones, to open for them the Door of Hope, to give 
them a new chance, is the call of Christian grace. 
Many a good woman I have known who would 
have been an outcast if some good mother, or 
faithful friend had not come to her rescue. The 
poor creature rises again to sin no more. We 
must not, we cannot, call a girl damned, because 
she has been led astray. 

We must have mercy on erring boys. Too much 
mercy to coddle them up, or condone their son- 
duct or laugh at their escapades, but mercy 
enough to give them another chance. With the 
temptations about them no wonder they deviate 
from the right path and are often criminal. The 
Sunday press, if it was run by devils, could not 
take a better way to ruin boys than by what it 
thinks are amusing caricatures. The illustrated 
supplement is the devil's own agent, and Indus- 
trial home and reformatories are filled with boys 
influenced by these Bohemians. The fearful ore- 
cocity of criminal boys grows with every day. We 
must have "Bowels of Mercies" if we rescue these 
perishing ones. There is no man so bad that he 
does not call for mercy, and every man who has 
a Christian heart must pity these criminals, black 
or white, who fill our chain gangs or our state 
prisons. We cannot be too pitiful. We never 
needed "Bowels of Mercies" more than we do 
today. "That mercy I to fithers show, that mercy 
show to me." 



THE EAST SALEM PREACHER. 



There was no doubt but religion was at a low 
ebb when young Wesley Skillman went to Bast 
Salem to preach. Time was when East Salem 
was considered the most "high-toned" place in the 
county. 

There was an academy there, and several stores 
were patronized by people for miles around. The 
rich people died, and their children ran through 
their money; the academy burned down and was 
never rebuilt. The churches gradually ran down. 
The Universalist Church was sold for a town hall. 
The Presbyterian families either died or moved 
away, until there were only two or three left, and 
they drove to Greenville to church occasionally, 
and I heard they put theit letters in there. They 
sold their church, and it was moved away to an- 
other town. That left the Baptist and Methodist 
churches. They hung on, but they paid their 
preacheis very poorly, and the attendance was 
small, of course. 

Lucy Rogers moved to East Salem not long ago, 
and she was telling me about how things went. 
It 'peared like the town was full of old maids and 
widows, and there wasn't many men to take the 
brunt of things in the church. Lucy said they 
made her a steward and class leader herself, 
though there wasn't no class to lead nor much 
money to take care of. She said there was gener- 
ally men enough out Sunday morning to pass the 
hat. 

Brother Skillman was a good young fellow, and 
a good preacher. He drove over to Flint school- 
house and preached once in two weeks. They 
gave him $50 a year, and Hedge Corners was sup- 
posed to give $100, and East Salem was appor- 
tioned $400, with the use of a parsonage. But they 
kept dropping behind until it seemed harder and 
harder to raise the minister's salary every year. 

There were two well-to-do families at East Sa- 



lem — the Dodges and the Balcombs. The widow 
Balcomb had a talk with Brother Skillman- when 
he first came, and told him how she wanted the 
church run and what kind of sermons she wanted 
him to preach. She 'lowed she would give $50 
if things went right. 

Well, they didn't go right, or to suit her any- 
way. The minister preached on secular subjects, 
she said, and he invited Mary Jane Crosby into 
the choir, when he had been told Anabelle Balcomb 
and she didn't speak, and Anabelle ran the choir, 
generally. Then Brother Skillman wouldn't take 
anything back that he had done, and so Mrs. Bal- 
comb refused to give. Still, she came to church. 

The farmers living around felt too poor to give 
much. They said five hundred dollars or more, 
and house rent, was big pay for a few hours' work 
on Sunday — over forty dollars a month, and a 
good farm hand could be hired for twenty-five dol- 
lars, who'd work every day in the week. Then 
folks told how old Elder Cole used to rent land, 
raise most of his own livin', besides alius turnin' 
in and helpin' the farmers when he went visitin' 
them. Then they bragged how he could preach. 
"Just give him a text as he come in the church 
door, and he could give you a sermon from it that 
was as good as if he had known it a week before," 
they said. 

Lucy said she pitied poor Brother Skillman. He 
had a nice, young wife, and it seemed she did all 
she could to help along, but it was very hard. 
The Balcombs bein' mad, it seemed lots of other 
folks staid away for fear they would have to pay 
more than their share of the expenses of the 
church. Brother Skillman wouldn't run' in debt 
for stuff to eat, so they went without what they 
couldn't get money to buy. Some of the farmer's 
families used to drop in for dinner, and stay for 
evening meeting quite often. 

Lucy sed Mrs. Skillman sed her husband's 
clothes just literally gave out, someway, all at 
once. Pants broke out at the knees, and his coat 
burst down the back. She was try in' to patch 
them Saturday night, and he sed, "No, I am not 
goin' to wear them. You know that fellow who 
staid with Us a few days and who worked for 
Farmer Greene, gave me his clothes — a new pair 
of denim overalls and a good, blue-checked shirt. 
They are new and clean. I shall wear them." 

It was noised around what the minister was go- 
in' to do, and there was a big crowd. 

Well, of course, it made a lot of talk, but he 
preached one of his best sermons. That week he 
got work of a farmer in the hayfield, and earned 
enough to get what he wanted to eat, and laid a 
little by toward his new clothes. He had not fin- 
ished his studies, and, bein' anxious to pass in 
the fall, he had studied hard all the year, but 
that week there was no time for study. 

Tired and lame, he went into the pulpit the 
next Sunday morning. After the first hymn, he 
got up and sed, "I have heard you often speak of 
givin' texts to Brother Cole. Will some one give 
me one? I have had no time to study up a sermon 
this week." 

It was so still you could have heard a pin drop 
for a minute. Then Silas Sloan, the village black- 
smith, who ain't a very pious man at heart, got 
up and sed, "I have heard a verse somethin' about 
the laborer bein' worthy of his hire." 

"Brother Meeker, you have a concordance in 
your Bible; won't you look it up for me?" asked 
Brother Skillman. 

After he had read a chapter and prayed, and 
they sang again, the young minister got up, and 
inquirin' where the text was at, he began to talk. 
He went back to the time Aaron was called to the 
priesthood. He spoke of the sacred call, then of 
the tribe of Levi, set apart for the work of the 
divine office. He touched on tithin' plain and 
strong, then he came down to the present time. 
He told of the long years of preparation many men 
give for Christian work; how they were subject 
to the call of anyone, and he spoke of the great 
need, of Christian visitin' in the neighborhood. "I 
neglected several sick people last week," sed he, 
"but I couldn't let my young wife starve. You 
have paid me $10 in six weeks. I must do some- 
thing." 

Then the minister begun exhortin' the folks to 
seek God and give themselves to a real, earnest 
Christian life. "My! it was a good thing he was 
preachin' in his shirt sleeves," Lucy sed, "for he 
certainly got warmed up to his subject." 

Mrs. Dodge got up and went out, but her hus- 
band stayed, and so did Mrs. Balsomb. She was 
mad at first, but she got awfully under, conviction 
and when the preacher dropped down to a tender. 



January 7, 1909. 



NOltTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



5. 



gentle tone of lovin' entreaty, Miss Bly, who sat 
near Mrs. Balcomb, sed she see her wipe her eyes 
with her lace handkerchief. 

The sermon lasted about an hour and a half, 
but it didn't cost anybody anything (they didn't 
take a collection) and nobody found any fault. 
Silas Sloan chuckled with satisfaction. After the 
closin' hymn he got up an' sed: 

"I ain't no church member, but if I knowed of 
a church run as Mr. Skillman has told of, I would 
like to be one. I believe it is right. My old moth- 
er was his kind of a Christian. You never ast me 
to give to your church. I am goin' to give this 
preacher one dollar out of every ten till I have 
paid ten dollars. I'll pay in advance. Who else 
will give ten dollars this mornin'? Say, Neighbor 
Greene, you told me you made a clear $100 on 
them cattle you sold last week, and you were all 
out of debt. Where is your tithe?" 

Brother Greene was a good man, but he had 
never been educated to give. He never before had 
looked at it in the light he did that mornin . 

"I will give my double tithe, for I made another 
good sale lately. I'll give twenty-five dollars," he 
replied. 

"Good!" sed Silas. "I like a good business deal 
in church. How much are they back on your sal- 
ary, Elder?" he ast. 

"Two hundred dollars," said Brother Skillman. 

"If we could get three more twenty-fives, I think 
we would make it right here," Silas went on. 

And what do you think Mrs. Balcomb did? She 
got up as sweet and kind-mannered as you please, 
and sed, "Twenty-five from me." Twenty-five from 
me," sed Miss Arabelle, "And from me," sed Aug- 
ustus Balcomb. 

Mr. Dodge has a big store and is very well fixed. 
He sed, "You can count me for one of five men to 
give ten dollars, and I will be glad to exchange 
the best suit of clothes in my store for the ones 
our preacher has rendered a valuable keepsake." 

"It wasn't no time," Lucy sed, "till over two 
hundred dollars was pledged, and when the people 
flocked 'round and shook hands with the preach- 
er, he just broke down and cried like a child. 

They say a common sermon is awful fatiguing 
to preach, but my! that was long enough for three, 
and then the poor fellow had worked hard at a 
new kind of work all the week before. 

Old Sister Bly began to sing, "Come ye Sinners, 
Poor and Needy." I guess it was her favorite, 
and Silas Sloan just broke down and sobbed there 
kneelin' at the preacher's side. It had been his 
mother's favorite hymn, too; and he gave his heart 
to God that very hour. And do you know, that 
was the beginnin' of a great revival at East Salem. 
It 'peared like folks had been afraid of the church, 
for fear it would cost something, but when thy 
gbt to givin', they enjoyed it. It 'peared like they 
all took on new life. 

The blue jeans and checked shirt hang in Mr. 
Dodge's store, and he is proud of them; and the 
Dodges and Balcombs all say, "Our preacher." "He 
is so smart and original," Mrs. Dodge sez. 

"I don't suppose Mrs. Balcomb would like to 
own it, but I believe," sed Lucy, "that she was 
never really converted till that day." — Florinda 
Twichell, in Home Herald. 



THE MOTHER'S REST ROOM. 



"A NECKLACE OF LOVE. 
"No rubies of red for my lady, 

No jewel that glitters and charms, 
But the light of the skies in the little one's 
eyes, 

And a necklace of two little arms. 

"Of two little arms that are clinging — 
Oh, ne'er was a necklace like this! 

And the wealth of the world and love's 
sweetness impearled 
In the joy of a little one's kiss. 

"A necklace of love for my lady, 

That was linked by the angels above; 
No other but this — and the tender, sweet 
kiss 

That sealeth a little one's love. 

" — F. L. Stanton/' 

* * * 

A young mother of a boy not much over three 
years old sent the poem we have quoted for the 
mothers to repeat three times as they enter the 
Rest-room. As they repeat the poem they are to 
see in their mind's eye their own little child with 
his arms around the neck, the tender sweet kiss 
on their lips, and hear the childish voice saying, 



with eager tones, "How we do love each other!" 

I saw that picture yesterday, and again last 
evening, when the baby boy, in night suit, ready 
for bed, stood beside his mother and "the necklace 
of two arms" went around the mother's neck and 
heard the joyous, confidential expression, "How 
we do love each other!" Millions of gold could 
not purchase that necklace. All mothers see the 
picture a few minutes later when the baby boy 
reverently kneels and the mother hears him in 
subdued tones say, "Now I lay me down to sleep," 
with the petition at the close, for God's blessings 
on all his dear ones. 

How wonderfully character in the child is 
formed! There is no in uence in all the world 
like the influence of a mother on her child. The 
kind of a mother she is to her daughter, that 
daughter will duplicate when she becomes a moth- 
er. The beauty and sweetness in the home today 
is copied into the home of the next generation. In 
this home of the young mother where I am look- 
ing from a west window I see such plants and 
trees as the mother saw in her home. I see in 
parlor and pantry some things placed exactly as 
the young mother saw them in her mother's home. 
I hear the same songs sung and the same stories 
told to the baby boy here that the mother learned 
years ago in her mother's home. More than that, 
I see the same requirements for exact obedience 
from the little one and also I hear the same lov- 
ing tones and sweet pet names. How good it is 
to go among the friends and acquaintances and 
see the beautiful domestic life that we And ev- 
erywhere! To read the pessimistic articles one 
runs across in the journals of the day one would 
really think that every man wanted a divorce and 
the women had no love for home or motherhood. 

"Here is a letter from Pennsylvania," said the 
secretary last week, "but I know it will be crowd- 
ed out. Take it for a page where there is some- 
thing about mother-love." So here 'tis: 

"I want to say to the mothers in our Rest-room 
that nothing forms so beautiful a character as 
the habit of absolute obedience to every command 
of the parent, with a loving, reasonable parent to 
issue the commands. A mother who fails to teach 
obedience, to require it and make the child feel 
it is a pleasure to obey, fails in a vital point. The 
reform schools and prisons are filled with the 
victims of disobedience. The school, the church 
and the home are made more delightful where 
children are trained through obedience to true 
manhood and womanhood. I have just visited in 
a home where there were four little boys. If I 
had said 'wild beasts,' It would have been nearer 
the truth. The mother's voice was always stri- 
dent and the orders to the children, to maid-ser- 
vant, to cook and scullery-boy sounded as though 
from a megaphone, and each child's voice was 
pitched in the same high key. The boys nagged 
each other, quarrelled among themselves, and I 
cannot remember one instance of real obedience 
to any of the commands of the mother. I use the 
word commands, for that is the way she address- 
ed her children. It was always, 'David Elias, you 
do this thing, and do it now! This instant! Don't 
let me have to speak to you again! Aren't you 
going to mind! Where's my riding whip?' 'Eu- 
gene Fitzhammond! What did you do that for? 
Don't you know I've told you a hundred times not 
to do that? Go right straight, this minute, and 
sit on the davenport in the library, and don't you 
leave it for ten minutes. Now mind! Why don't 
you mind? I never did see such children!" 

When the secretary had read this letter, the 
philosopher said in an undertone: "Where the 
heathen rage and the people^, imagine a vain 
thing.' " The secretary made a long pause, then 
said: "There is more in this letter. Let me 
read the rest of it: "There was another home 
where I spent several days. The first home was 
one of wealth and the host holds an honorable 
position in State and Government." 

"The wife certainly does not!" said the philoso- 
pher in usual undertone. 

"The second home," read the secretary, "was 
that of a teacher in a small college. There were 
four boys in this home, but more quiet, gentleman- 
ly little fellows I never saw. At the table, one 
day, the youngest said: 'I want some celery.' The 
mother turned her eyes toward the child with a 
smile in them and the father said: 'How was 
that?' 'Please, mamma, I should like some celery.' 
The child had his celery. There were no maid- 
servants or man-servants, but there was peace 
and gentleness and beauty in this home, and bye 
and bye there will be four men, if God spares their 
lives to make four more homes as beautiful as 



this one where I spent several delightful days. 
This mother had a great deal to do, but she was 
never too busy to speak gently and lovingly to 
her children. She had time to take her little 
ones in her arms and devote herself to them. They 
were not made to feel that clean faces and clean 
windows and clean garments were of more con- 
sequence than themselves. They will never grow 
up with starved souls and hungry hearts. As a 
girl I never knew what it was to be petted and I 
cannot tell you, mothers of the Rest-room, how 
much good it did me to find one mother who could 
call her children by sweet names and have "the 
necklace of love' around her own neck — a neck- 
lace that has its links made 'by the angels above' 
and fastened together by the kiss from baby lips." 

"I was at Chanute, Kans., a short time ago," 
said the invalid in the Morris chair, "and I went 
into one of the prettiest little book stores I've seen 
in many a day. I had about enough money in my 
purse to get my railroad ticket; I had been to 
one of the best missionary meetings I ever attend- 
ed, and that was one reason I had no more money. 
I put down on a show-case ten cents for a couple 
'of beautiful views of the city on post-cards. The 
owner of the book store is not only a lover of 
pictures and books, but a writer of books. My 
package that I brought home had in it, besides 
pictures of the avenue where I was a guest for 
several days, the church where was held our meet- 
ings and other cards, a book of poems — a dainty 
book, 'Jayhawker Juleps. Here it is." And the 
philosopher examined it, saying in an amused 
tone, as she looked at the blossoms and cup on 
the pale green cover, "Juleps from the sunflower! 
Good temperance drink!" The secretary read 
from the title-page: ■ 

"Let me but bring to woeful faces 
Effulgent eyes, and radiant smiles, 

I'll turn to gardens desert places, 

And change long leagues to cheery miles." 
And added, "That is just what the author, J. M. 
Cavaness, is always doing."— Mrs. Charlotte F. 
Wilder, in Central Christian Advocate. 



THE NEED OF SPIRITUAL POWER. 

The present time is remarkable for a great 
quickening of activity in various directions among 
the Christian Churches. No more remarkable de- 
velopment than the Laymen's Missionary Move- 
ment has taken place in the religious world with- 
in a century. Equally notable in Canada, is (he 
awakening of interest in the moral and social con- 
dition of our country. As never before, i l he 
churches are setting themselves seriously to grap- 
ple with the giant evils that prey upon the com- 
munity, and to assist in remedying 1 the social 
wrongs that offend the Christian law of love. It 
is well that while these forms of practical effort 
are being prosecuted we should be summoned also 
to a revival of evangelistic fervor. All evangelism 
that is worthy of the name is marked not only by 
a more definite and whole-hearted seeking of the 
lost, but by a simultaneous deepening of the spirit- 
ual life among Christian people. It is clear that 
no great movement can be carried on strongly 
and successfully without adequate power; and un- 
less there comes to the church at this time an ac- 
cess of power from on high, her new activity will 
prove fleeting and ineffective. The missionary 
movement nor the moral reform movement nor 
even the evangelistic movement will run of its 
own momentum. By the invisible wires of faith 
and prayer they must draw upon the might of the 
Omnipotent. — Toronto Presbyterian. 



HEAR YE HIM." 

To many there comes no Mount of Tranfigura- 
tion, but there is for all the speech of the Son. 
If the majority are not called to some mount of 
vision, where they may behold the glory as the 
three men beheld it, yet to every soul amid the 
multitudes of the redeemed He speaks in every 
passing day. God forbid that the babel of earth's 
voices should drown the accents of His "still, 
small voice." — G. Campbell Morgan. 



PRAYER FOR REVIVAL. 

If we really wish a revival, with all that it 
means and all that is involved, and are praying 
for that, we will receive it. God will not deny us. 
He can not deny Himself. His own truthfulness 
is concerned. His own honor is pledged. But if 
we really mean that we wish a revival, let us pray 
for a revival. Let us not forget that we are to be 
fishers of men, and let us pray for fish. — Ex. 



6 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 7, 1909. 



From The Field. 



Wanted At Once. 

A preacher for Spruce Pine cir- 
cuit, Morganton district. Has a par- 
sonage at Spruce Pine, on the rail- 
road. 

For information write C. T. Hickey 
or Filmore Blalock, both of Spruce 
Pine, N. C. 

R. M. HOYLE. 



is very greatly needed to facilitate 
our work. We hope for a year of 
growth under divine guidance. 

With best wishes for the Christ- 
mas season. 

Yours very truly, 

J. H. BARNHARDT. 



Shelby District. 

Rev. C. F. Sherrill, presiding elder 
of the Shelby district, writes that he 
has put Rev. G. L. Keever on the 
South Fork circuit, with the consent 
of Bishop Atkins. 

Brother Keever has served Ther- 
mal City and Ozark, Gastonia. He 
gives up the principalship of Lowes- 
ville High School for this work, and 
will move at once. Brother Keever 
has a fine record as a pastor, and no 
doubt will do a good work on the 
new charge. 



Married. 

At the Methodist parsonage in 
Lilesville, N. C, December 22, 1908, 
Mr. A. B. McCurrie and Miss Eu- 
genia Lindsay, were united in matri- 
mony, Rev. E. J. Poe, officiating. 
They immediately took the train for 
Rutherford county to spend their 
honeymoon and holidays among the 
relatives of the groom. 



Central Church, Albemarle. 

The work moves on without 
a break, with the new confer- 
ence year. The roof will soon 
be on our new church, and the con- 
gregation is tsruggling manfully to 
meet the payments as the work goes 
on. Dr., Rowe, our new presiding elder 
has been with us preaching one of 
the strong sermons characteristic of 
himself, and encouraging the congre- 
gation in every good work. Dr. Rowe 
is no stranger in these paVts, and 
hence our people are more than glad 
to have him as their chief pastor. 
Sincerely, 
H. C. SPRINKLE. 

December 26, 1908. 



A Pounding at Bryson City. 

I wish hereby to express my hearty 
appreciation of the very generous 
pounding with which I was greeted 
recently when a large number of the 
good people of Bryson City of all 
church relations waited upon us with 
the most generous pounding with 
which we have ever been favored. 

I pray God's richest blessings to 
rest upon them; and may they be 
abundantly compensated in heavenly 
things, for this kind favor bestowed 
upon us. 

Very gratefully, 

J. J. EADS. 



Lenoir Circuit. 

I have finished one round, and 
have just passed through one of the 
most pleasant Christmas seasons of 
my life. I used to hear that Santa 
Claus came down the chimney, but 
now I know he comes in a wagon, on 
foot and by mail. In many ways he 
continued his calls from Wednesday, 
the 26th, and the people of the Le- 
noir circuit have learned by experi- 
ence that it is more blessed to give 
than to receive. We are singing 
"praise God from whom all blessings 
flow." May God continue to smile 
upon the good people who are striv- 
ing to make our pathway smooth. 

There are seven appointments on 
this circuit and I have just conpleted 
the first round. I find plenty of op- 
portunity for recreation, also much 
pleasdre in enjoying the hospitality 
of these people. We have reason to 
thank God for the kind hearts which 
we find every where we go. 

J. OSBORNE ERVIN. 



tor and his family should not be per- 
fectly pleased with the parsonage. 
The King's Mountain church is one 
of the prettiest in the conference, not 
the most expensive, and yet it would 
cost now twenty thousand dollars to 
build such a church. 

It would be a great credit to any 
town of five times the population. 
The congregation is blessed with a 
goodly number of elect ladies who 
push the work of the church. The 
official board is planning to da the 
work systematically and well this 
year, and of course they will suc- 
ceed. 

Our first quarterly conference has 
just been held. Brother Sherrill 
held the business session Saturday 
night and preached Sabbath night to 
the delight of all present. Being con- 
secrated to his work, energetic and 
wise, of course, he will do a fine 
year's work, as he always does. 

If we had selected our own place 
we could not have been better pleas- 
ed, and we hope to be able to do a 
good year's work. 

Sincerely, 
D. FRANK CARVER. 



Bryson City. 

We have just had our presiding el- 
der, Rev. R. M. Taylor, with us at 
our first quarterly conference. We 
are always glad to see his sunny 
face; and always find him in shape 
for business and for counsel as well 
as for preaching. He held the quar- 
terly conference in his usual elegant 
way, and preached for us three times 
very acceptably. Withall he is a 
good preacher, good presiding elder, 
a safe, good man; and a growing 
man. I think it fortunate that he- 
was returned to the district for the 
fourth year. Truly, 

J. J. EADS. 

Dec. 15, 1908. 



Waynesville. 

In a private letter, Rev. J. H. Barn- 
hardt, says: "We are delighted with 
our new charge. The people have 
accorded us a splendid reception, and 
everything starts well. Beautiful for 
situation is the town of Waynesville, 
it is in fact becoming a city of no 
mean proportions. Our church is well 
established here, with a fine type of 
loyal supporters. Present indications 
seem, to point to a new and commod- 
ious church building as one of the 
probabilities of the near future. This 



To Pastors and laymen of the 
Waynesville District. 

Dear Brethren: — I write to ask you 
to co-operate in a movement to place 
one hundred and fifty new names on 
the Advocate mailing list and renew 
the old list during the month of Jan- 
uary. The paper is good literature. 
It will make loyal and intelligent 
Methodists more loyal and intelli- 
gent. All stewards ought to take it. 
Parents will be making a good in- 
vestment to put it into the hands of 
their children. The Christian Life 
Page is satisfying to the spiritual ap- 
petite. The editorials are timely ut- 
terances from a live editor. Besides 
the contributions, personal notes, 
and other features furnish constant 
source of entertainment and intsruc- 
tion. 

Let the societies get "ready to re- 
new or subscribe on February 1st. 
This date is set for the work in the 
Waynesville district. Let all the 
pastors and all the charges move to- 
gether. Our district must not be be- 
hind in any kind of good work. Our 
people do things when they will. If 
the scheme to run the list to 10,000 
fails let it not be laid to the charge 
of these high class mountain Meth- 
odists. 

Yours for success, 

W. H. WILLIS. 



King's Mountain. 

We are in our comfortable, conven- 
ient parsonage at King's Mountain, 
and are well pleased with the people, 
the church, and our home. The good 
people have provided well for the 
convenience and comfort of their 
preacher and family. 

Hard by the church, lighted with 
electricity, well furnished, soon to 
have city water brought in, there 
seems to be no reason why the pas- 



Charlotte District. 

The apportionment of new sub- 
scribers to the Advocate to be se- 
cured within the Charlotte district 
is given below. I hope that every 
pastor will see that the number of 
new subscribers assigned to his 
charge is secured by April 1st. 

Let us make January Advocate 
month in the Charlotte district, and 
secure the number, and more, as- 
signed to us, so that we may turn 
our attention to the conference col- 
lections and secure them in full if 
possible by May 15th. Will not some 
member of each church volunteer to 
assist the pastor in securing the sub- 
scribers assigned to his charge dur- 
ing the month of February? If you 
will do this, God will bless you in 
the service thus rendered him. 

We ought to secure 200 subscribers 
in a month, and we can do it if we 
make up our minds to do so. This 
will be a good investment in the 
Lord's business, and we will not 
have to wait long for good dividends. 

The apportionments are as fol- 
lows : 

Ansonville 15 

Charlotte, Belmont Park 10 

Charlotte, Brevard Street 10 

Charlotte, Calvary 10 

Charlotte, Chadwick and Severs- 

ville 15 

Charlotte, Dilworth-Big Spring . . 8 

Charlotte, Trinity 20 

Charlotte, Tryon Street 20 

North Charlotte 10 

Derita 15 

Lilesville ... 10 

Matthews 10 

Monroe, Central Church ... 12 

Morven 12 

Mount Zion 10 

North Monroe and Icemorlee ... 8 

Pineville 8 

Polkton ... ... ' 10 

Prospect 10 

Unionville 10 

Wadesboro 10 

Waxhaw 10 

Weddington 10 

Fraternally, 

H. K. BOYER. 

To the Pastors of the Western North 
Carolina Conference — How to Help 
the Children's Home: 

1. To secure uniformity of action, 
the Board of Trustees suggest that 
each charge secure subscriptions for 
the building fund equal to the 
amount of conference collections for 
■the charge, these subscriptions to 
be paid within two years. Some 
charges of course can pay more than 
this amount, while others may not 



be able to pay quite so much. A 
sum equal to to the above is abso- 
lutely necessary for the erection of 
the buildings needed for beginning 
the work. 

2. Let every pastor keep con- 
stantly before the attention of the 
superintendents and Sunday schools 
the fifth Sunday collections, a fund 
set apart for maintainig the orphan- 
age. The standard for this collection 
is five cents from every scholar ev- 
ery fifth Sunday. I want to ask ev- 
ery pastor to urge each superinten- 
dent to ask his school to vote to au- 
thorize the treasurer of his school to 
send to G. F. Ivey, Treasurer, Hick- 
ory, N. C, immediately after each 
fifth Sunday, at least five cents for 
each scholar on the roll. Some of 
the schools have already taken this 
advanced step. 

3. There are many people in our 
conference who are willing to make 
bequests in their wills to the Chil- 
dren's Home, or to give annuities to 
it. Any information as to who these 
are will be galdy received. 

4. As it will be impossible for me 
as agent to visit every charge even 
during the next two years, I must 
therefore depend upon the pastors 
to help me. As the agent I will, 
therefore, be very glad at any time 
to receive suggestions from any of 
the pastors. Should there be an op- 
portunity for me to do any special 
work on your charge, I shall be glad 
to respond most heartily. 

Very respectfully, 

J. P. RODGERS, 
Field Agent Children's Home. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



WHAT ARE THE RESPONSIBILI- 
TIES OF THE LAYMEN OF 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT. 
Spiritual — Material — Missionary. 

(The following paper was read at 
the Laymen's Meeting of the Greens- 
boro district, by Mr. M. W. Sterne, 
of Greensboro. — Editor.) 



In answering this question the re- 
sponsibilities of the Laymen are de- 
fined as threefold, Spiritual, Material 
and Missionary. 

In point of order the Spiritual hag 
rightly been placed first, and needs 
to be emphasized as the most impor- 
tant responsibility that could possi- 
bly engage the attention of Laymen. 

From the Spiritual comes the in- 
spiration and earnestness that bring 
results and accomplish things in the 
Material, and from the Spiritual 
there flows out a fiery zeal that finds 
an outlet in all the great missionary 
movements in the world. 

So I but voice a truth when I say 
that it is right to place first and em- 
phasize strongly the spiritual in this 
Laymen's movement. 

God requires your life and mine to 
be fruitful and helpful to others. 

I will go a step further and say, as 
Christians, we cannot successfully 
work out our own salvation without 
helping others work out theirs. 

To do this, we must be in earnest, 
must be intensely spiritual. To be 
intensely and helpfully spiritual to 
others, we must walk continually 
with Christ, in our business and tem- 
poral affairs, as well as our religeous 
and spiritual. 

To equip ourselves to meet this 
spiritual responsibility, two things 
are necessary: Prayer and God's 
Word. 

We must meet Christ often in 
prayer; we must pray more. If 
Christ, sinless as he was, found it 
needful to pray often for strength 
to meet his daily trials and tempta- 
tions, much more you and I, sinful 
men, need to pray for strength to 
meet the daily trials and duties. 



January 7, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



Then again we need to study God's 
word more. Fellow Laymen, do you 
know why there are so many weak 
and inactive Christians? Hear me, 
it is because they do not study God's 
word. What food is to the natural 
body, making it grow strong and vig- 
orous, God's word is to the spiritual 
body. Could you hope to keep strong 
or live long simply contenting your- 
self with knowing that food was on 
your table and not eating? or sim- 
ply eating a meal occasionally, say 
every Sunday? No more can you 
hope to grow spiritually strong if 
you neglect God's word. 

Fellow Laymen, I would urge upon 
you the importance of giving God's 
word the first place in your religious 
employment. Studying it daily, not 
simply as a religious duty, but be- 
cause you love it. 

David does not say, Blessed is the 
man who reads this daily. He does 
say, "Blessed is the man whose de- 
light is in the law of the Lord, and 
who meditates " upon it day and 
night." 

Would you become useful Laymen, 
having ower with God and influence 
over man? I would urge you to 
study God's Word. Like Job learn 
to esteem it more than your neces- 
sary food. 

Then under the inspiration and in- 
fluence of His presence and teaching 
we will become better men and more 
useful Laymen in the work of the 
church, in uencing men whose lives 
we daily touch, convincing them that 
there is something real in our relig- 
ious professions, something that lifts 
us up above the world, enabling us 
to use the world, not abusing it; 
something that amidst these perilous 
times keeps us with faith unshaken, 
with hope growing brighter with 
each day's service of sacrifice and 
love. 

Fellow Laymen, of the Greensboro 
district, may we gather here today 
inspiration that will send us forth 
with purposes more fixed, to be and 
to do more for the church of our 
choice. In a word, let us resolve to 
be spiritual Laymen. 



In Memoriam. — Mrs. Mary Craven. 

Sister Mary Craven was born the 
seventh day of March, in the year of 
our Lord, 1813. She was a sister of 
Rev. Benton Field, of precious mem- 
ory, who was an uncle of the Rev. 
Dan. Field, of Leaksville. She mar- 
ried Kindred Craven, who was one 
year her senior, May, 1835, with 
whom she lived happily for 55 years, 
he having died in the year 1890. 

To them were born five children. 
The first born, Benton Craven, was 
killed in the war between the states, 
September 12, 1862. His remains 
were brought back and interred in 
the old church graveyard at Bethle- 
hem. A splendid monument stands 
at the head of his grave, bearing the 
inscription: "Benton Craven, son of 
Kindred and Mary Craven; died Sep- 
tember 12, 1862, aged 26 years, 5 
months and 6 days." 

Another son, Rev. Jeremiah F. 
Craven, who served his day and gen- 
eration as a minister of the gospel 
and a member of the Western North 
Carolian Conference, died September 
17, 1907. He sleeps the silent sleep 
of death by the side of his brother 
Benton. 

One son, K. L. Craven, of Concord; 
two daughters, Mrs. Ellen Field, of 
Climax, and Mrs. Mary Gretter, of 
Friendship, survive to mourn their 
departed dead. 

Sister Craven made her home with 
Mary Gretter, till the Rev. Robert M. 
Gretter, died last September. This 
sad event forced a breaking up of 
cherished relations and sister Craven 



went to Concord to live with her son. 
On Sunday, December 13, without 
previous sickness of a serious nature, 
she suddenly fell on sleep, and died 
in a good old age, an old woman, and 
full of years — four score years and 
sixteen — and was gathered to her 
people in the better land. 

Sister Craven made a public pro- ' 
fession of religion in her sixteenth 
year, and united with the Methodist 
society at Bethlehem, an old camp 
meeting place of which it may be 
said in that day, "The Lord shall 
come when He writeth up the peo- 
ple, that this and that man were 
born there." Eighty years a devout 
follower of the meek and lowly Je- 
sus. What a stretch of time! I sup- 
pose that even a large size book 
could not contain the many interest- 
ing incidents, and coincidents, that 
transpired during this long and 
eventful life of eminent usefulness. 
How inadequate the time and space 
allotted to tell one-tenth of the most 
inspiring events. From the year the 
camp meeting was established at 
Bethlehem she has never missed a 
single one. How well do. we remem- 
ber last summer during the time her 
son-in-law was so extremely ill the 
anxiety and solicitude she manifest- 
ed with fear that she would not be 
able to attend the annual camp meet- 
ing at Bethlehem the fourth Sunday 
in August. But her heart's desire 
was granted. She was there to con- 
tribute the influence and benediction 
of her presence and prayers and 
faith and personal work in leading 
souls to Christ and sustaining the 
cherished work of her soul. She had 
a tent with open doors to preachers 
and strangers. To her hospitable 
home, not far away, the circuit rid- 
ers, as they oft passed by, always 
found a most hearty welcome and 
abundant hospitality. The little 
chamber where was set a bed, and a 
table, and a stool and a candlestick, 
was arranged for the man of God. 
And such prophets as Doub, Lewis, 
Reid, Barringer, Wilson, Cummings, 
Adams, Brooks, Tillett, Hunt and 
many others turned in thither to en- 
joy the unstinted and lavished hos- 
pitality of her home. Who would 
doubt for a moment that these now 
glorified souls of God were just at 
the beautiful gates to welcome her 
in. 

We heard it said the day of her 
burial by her neighbors and friends, 
that she was the best woman in all 
that section. The rich legacy left 
her children and friends, as a goodly 
heritage, rather to be chosen than 
great riches is a good name — a name 
for virtue, truth, honesty, hope, char- 
ity, faith and courage. Her cheerful 
demeanor, bright Christian spirit, 
and beautiful life were a benediction 
to all with whom she came in contact 
and while God has called her to lay 
down all earthly service after 96 
years of struggles and triumphs in 
His cause, for a more glorious ser- 
vice in the Father's house of many 
mansions, yet she will not die in the 
hearts and lives of those who knew 
and loved her. She has passed away 
like a gentle breath at an age far 
beyond the time allotted to man, and 
our hearts deeply sorrow for our loss, 
but what are we that we should 
question divine wisdom. God has 
done it and we should be dumb. It 
is more fitting that we should rejoice 
that such a life has inherited its 
well-deserved reward. May these 
many years of consecration reap 
large results and her example be 
emulated by many; that Christ she 
loved and served so faithfully be 
known in the homes of loved ones 
she has left behind. We pray that 
the spirit of resignation, of faith, and 




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assurance that God doeth all things 
well fill the hearts of loved ones 
from whom she has been separated 
for a time, as the days of this sepa- 
ration grow fewer. 

Her funeral was conducted by the 
writer from Bethlehem church in the 
presence of a large concourse of sor- 
rowing friends and relatives, and her 
mortal remains were laid at rest in 
the church graveyard nearby among 
loved ones who had preceded her to 
the glory world. 

J. A. BOWLES. 



Derita. 

Rev. Seymour Taylor, the pastor, 
writes: 

"My people have received me very 
kindly. The Trinity congregation 
gave us a nice pounding one day last 
week. Dr. Boyer held our fir^t quar- 
terly meeting last Saturday and Sun- 
day. He made a very fine impres- 
sion. The stewards very kindly in- 
creased the salary for the preacher 
$50.00." 



mas, a committee from Harrison's 
church, visited the parsonage bring- 
ing with them, in kindly remem- 
brance, many useful things for the 
pantry. This indeed is their annual 
custom. They remember the preach- 
er on Christmas eve in a very sub- 
stantial way and render it impossible 
for him and his not to remember 
them for many days — indeed for 
weeks. Certainly we shall not. "The 
lines are fallen unto us in pleasant 
places; yea, we have a goodly heri- 
tage." 

Fraternally, 

W. S. HALES. 



Pineville. 

The first quarterly conference for 
the Pineville circuit was held at Pine- 
ville on December 26th and 27th. Our 
new presiding elder, Dr. Boyer, was 
in the chair. No one would have sus- 
pected him as new at the business. 
His presidency has thus far given 
perfect satisfaction. I have heard 
many expressions from the brethren 
and every one favorable. The meet- 
ing itself was a success both as to 
attendance and the work done. The 
pastor's salary was advanced some 
over that of last year, and we start 
out expecting to make this the best 
year we have yet had. The outlook 
is encouraging. 

On the 24th, the day before Christ- 



THE DEATH OF CHRIST. 
The only hope that is reasonable for 
the futuie of the church of Christ is 
found in the death of Christ. This is 
the only thing that lifts me above dis- 
couragement and apprehension, in 
vit.w of the many undesirable and un- 
happy ciicumstances that attend the 
life of the church in the present day. 
Her worldly conformity, her sad dis- 
scntions, the breaking up of her unity 
— all of these things would seem to 
me utterly to destroy hope if one were 
not held fast by that blessed word. 
The death of Christ is the covenant of 
hope for the church. — Charles Cuth- 
bert Hall. 



WHEN GOD SPEAKS. 
When God speaks He likes no other 
voice to break the stillness, but his 
own, and hence the place that has al- 
ways been given to solitude in all 
true religious life. It can be over- 
done, but it can be grossly underdone. 
And there is no lesson more worth in- 
sisting on in days like ours than this: 
When God wants to speak with a man, 
He wants that man to be alone. — Hen- 
ry Diummond. 



8. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 7, 1909. 



The Christian Life. 



A HAPPY NEW YEAR. 

Years come and go. Swifter than 
a weaver's shuttle is the flight of 
time. On the morning of January 
the first, the words which come to 
us are instinctively culled from the 
Book in Which we find epitomized the 
story of man's life: "Lord, thou hast 
been our dwellingplace in all gener- 
ations. Before the mountains were 
brought forth, or even thou hadst 
formed the earth and the world, from 
everlasting to everlasting thou art 
God. Thou tumest man to destruc- 
tion, and sayest, Return ye children 
of men. For a thousand years in 
thy sight are but as yesterday when 
it is past, and as a watch in the 
night." 

In the doorway of a new year we 
stand looking forward into an un- 
known future, and behind us is the 
long procession of the past. A thou- 
sand years in the Divine sight are 
but as yesterday . . . and as a 
watch in the night." Tp us living as 
we do, one day at a time, twelve 
months seem to stretch away into 
infinite space. What prayer can we 
make for the days that are coming, 
except that we may be taught to 
"number" them, so that we "may ap- 
ply our hearts unto wisdom." "O 
satisfy us early with thy mercies," 
we plead, "that we may rejoice and 
be glad all our days. Make us glad 
according to the days wherein thou 
hast afflicted us, and the years where- 
in we have seen evil. Let thy work 
appear unto thy servants, and thy 
glory unto their children; and let 
the beauty of the Lord our God be 
upon us, and establish thou the work 
of our hands upon us; yea, the work 
of our hands establish thou it." 

In all literature there is nothing no- 
bler than the Ninetieth Psalm. Noth- 
ing written by human hands is more 
appropriate for the opening of this 
new year. What better wish can we 
pray for friend or kinsman than that 
"the beauty of the Lord our God" 
may be upon him? What better am- 
bition entertained in ourselves than 
the desire that "the work of our 
hands" may not be ephemeral, but 
may be "established" and stand? 

"When prayer delights thee least, 
then learn to say: 

Soul, now is greatest need that thou 
shouldst pray. 

"Say what is prayer when it is pray- 
er indeed? 

The mighty utterance of a mighty 
need. 

"The man is praying who doth press 

with -might 
Out of his darkness into God's own 

light. 

"All things that live from God their 

sustenance wait, 
And sun and moon are beggars at his 

gate." 

If for any one dear to me. I could 
breathe a petition in the ear of God, 
it would be that the prayer-life should 
be fuller and more intimate than ever 
before. No year can be truly happy 
that is not a year made blessed by 
communion with heaven. If in the 
years that are gone we have been 
limiting our thought of God by the 
low conception born of our own fi- 
nite natures, would it not be a beau- 
tiful thing if we could get more of 
the feeling the ransomed have as 
they see the Savior face to face? It 
will be a Happy New Year for us if 
in it we carry all our little wants, 
and our larger ones, straight to God. 

It may have happened to some of 
us in the past very earnestly to 'long 



for light on our darkness; to pray for 
it, and then to act upon what seemed 
to be the illumination given. Later 
we may have found that we have 
seemed- mistaken. The thing we did 
we regretted; the answer we expect- 
ed did not come. 

Shall we, therefore, rashly con- 
clude that our Lord did not hear, and 
that prayer is in vain? If this be 
the outcome of our mistakes, we shall 
have committed life's greatest mis- 
take — that of turning away from the 
simplicity of - children, and refusing 
to believe that our Father knows 
best. Whatever be withheld or de- 
nied, granted or received, all that has 
been in the past has been in God's 
hand, all that shall be in the future 
will be from him. With dear Miss 
Waring we may say in this year's be- 
ginning: 

"Father, I know that all my life 

Is portioned out for me, 
And the changes that are sure to 
come 

I do not fear to see; 
But I ask thee for a present mind 
Intent on pleasing thee. 

I ask thee for a thoughtful love 
Through constant watching wise, 

To meet the glad with joyous smiles, 
And wipe the weeping eyes, 

And a heart at leisure from itself 
To soothe and sympathize. 

Wherever in the world I am, 

In whatsoe'er estate, 
I have a fellowship with hearts 

To keep and cultivate; 
And a work of lowly work to do 

For the Lord on whom I wait. 

There are briers besetting every path 

That call for patient care; 
There is a cross in every lot, 

And an earnest need for prayer; 
But a lowly heart that leans on thee 

Is happy anywhere." 

I think we shall be moro success- 
ful in making happy the new year if 
we take up some definite task, and 
perse veringly toil toward its accom- 
plishment. If we are teaching in the 
Sunday school, may we not regard 
the class as our parish? A teacher 
never rounds out fully her service 
unless she has gained the friendship 
of the children, has their confidence, 
and knows something of their life 
during the week. She may herself 
be a busy person, with very little ex- 
tra time; but now and then, on a half 
holiday, or in the evening, she may 
call on the children in their homes, 
or may have them in her own. The 
Sunday school is the real nursery 
of the church; and where the Bible 
is faithfully taught to the little ones 
there we may expect to see large ac- 
cessions to the list of communicants. 

What may we do to add to the hap- 
piness of our homes? Possibly in 
one pf them there is an invalid. 
Weary days and nights of watchful- 
ness are appointed to her. Are we 
doing the little things we can to 
cheer her, to relieve her loneliness, 
and to make her shadpwed :ife 
brighter? Are we trying tp make chil- 
dren happy? It takes very little tp 
p-lease them; a flower, a toy, a puz- 
zle, a book, a story told in the twi- 
light, and unexpected treat — any of 
these things fill children's hearts 
with gladness such as older people 
seldom enjoy. If you are a mother, 
cease saying "No," when you might 
as well say "Yes." Do not discrimi- 
nate unfairly between the children. 
In some of our homes the little ones 
are allowed to tyrannize over the old- 
er sisters and brothers; in other the 



older one are encouraged to be heed- 
less and selfish in their intercourse 
with the juniors. If life is to be a 
happy thing for any of us in the com- 
ing days, we must have under our 
conduct a broad foundation of jus- 
tice. 

We whp weekly meet in . this Cor- 
ner have already had many happy 
years together. Life for us has been 
full of the Father's goodness. As 
the days go on, shall we not trust 
the unfailing love? Shall we not 
hope day by day for something bet- 
ter than we have ever had before? 
It may be that ships are coming 
home to us across the sea, freighted 
with joy that we do not expect; there 
may be new friends coming to make 
our lives blessed, and comfort tor 
those we have lost. Perhaps we are 
to have new opportunities for useful- 
ness. Perhaps just around the cor- 
ner veiled to day, there is waiting for 
us some revelation of our Savior, 
some fuller vision of his grace than 
we have ever had before. In this 
New Year "the beauty of the Lord 
our God be upon us" all, and may he 
"establish upon us the work of our 
hands." — Christian Intelligencer. 



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1 



Our Little Folios. 



ROBIN'S NEW YEAR. 

On the snowy branch of the holly- 
bush 

A gay little redbreast sings: 
"Happy New Year to all, to all," says 
he, 

Oh! loudly his greeting rings. 
And in the warm nursery, way high 
up 

From the window pane looks down, 
A dear little girl with sunshiny hair 
And a boy with eyes so brown. 

To robin they call, "Ho, ho, little bird 

Why singing so gayly, pray? 
The snow is so deep, the wind is so 
keen, 

You'll freeze with the cold today." 
"Icicles hang on mistletoe bough 

And snow on the meadow lies 
But I fear -not the cold this New 
Year's morn," 

The brave little bird replies. 

"For God he is good, and God he is 
love, 

He made the land and the sea; 
And the God that sees when the spar- 
rows fall 
Will also take care of me." 
Then he eats with a thankful heart 
the crumbs 
That the small white hands let fall, 
And sings from his swing in holly- 
bush, 

"Happy New Year to all, to all!" 

— Selected. 



GOOSEY LUCY'S NEW YEAR'S 
CALLS. 

"Where are you going, Uncle 
Fred?" asked Lucy. 

"I am going to make New Year's 
calls, little girls," replied Uncle Fred. 

"And how do you make them? 
What are they made of?" inquired 
Lucy. 

"Oh — ah — my dear child?" said 
Uncle Fred, who was looking for his 
umbrella in a great hurry. "They are 
not made of anything. You — ah — you 
just call, you know, on all the people 
you know. Oh, here it is! Goodbye, 
little girl! I must be off." 

And off he hurried, leaving Lucy 
mystified in the hall. 

"You just call," she repeated. "Just 
call all the people you know. Why, 
that is easy enough; but what a fun- 
ny thing to do!" 

She pondered a few minutes and 
then continued, "I think I will go 
and make New Year's calls. It must 
be great fun! Perhaps, I shall meet 
Uncle Fred, and then we can call 
together, and that will be just twice 
as loud." 

Away ran the little girl to her 
room. -Blue coat, blue leggins, blue 
mittens, swan's down hood, all were 
on in three minute's time; and with- 
out a thought of mamma or nurse, 
or anybody else, Lucy slipped out of 
the door, and ran merrily down the 
street. 

Oh, how fresh and clear the air 
was! how the snow sparkled in the 
sunlight! what a fine thing it was to 
make New Year's calls! 

And now the question was, where 
she should call first. Why at grand- 
ma's of course! her house was in the 
square, just around the corner. And 
then she would go to Aunt Maria's, 
and then — well, she would think 
about the next place as she went 
along, but here was grandmamma's 
house now. 

Lucy looked up at all the windows, 
but no one was in sight. 

So much the better! She planted 
herself squarely on the curbstone, 
and opening her mouth to its fullest 
extent, shoute*d, "Grandmamma! 



Grandmamma! Grandmamma!! 
Grandmamma! ! ! " 

Her grandmother, • who was sitting 
quietly by the first reading, heard the 
piercing screams, and running to the 
window as fast as her dear old feet 
could carry her, saw Lucy, panting 
and crimson, with her mouth just 
opening for another shout. 

Something had happened at home! 
an accident, probably. No time must 
be lost. Grandmamma threw up the 
sash. 

"Run and call the doctor!" she 
cried. "Quick, dear! Don't sto"p to 
tell me about it, but run! I will be 
there in three minutes!" And she 
shut the window and trembling with 
anxiety, hastened to put on her shawl 
and bonnet, and almost ran through 
the snow to her daughter's house. 

Meanwhile, Lucy ran on in high 
glee. I hadn't thought of the doc- 
tor!" she said, " but of course I will 
go there, as grandmamma wishes it. 
What fun it is!" 

The doctor's house was soon reach- 
ed, and Lucy's shouts brought the 
good man quickly to the door. 

"Bless me!" he said. "Mrs. Gra- 
ham's little girl! Baby ill again, I 
suppose? All right, my dear!" he 
said to Lucy. "I'll be there instantly. 
Run and tell them I'm coming," and 
he shut the door and calls for his 
boots. 

Lucy danced along enchanted with 
her new play, and soon reached Aunt 
Maria's house, where she called 
again with might and main. Now, 
Aunt Maria was slightly deaf, and 
when she heard her own name, re- 
sounding in a clear, shrill scream, 
"Aunt Mari-i-i-ia! " she thought it was 
a cry of fire! 

Throwing up the window (she was 
a very nervous and excitable person), 
she shrieked, "Fire! Fire! police! 
watchman! help! help! fire!! fire!!!" 
till everybody within a dozen blocks 
heard her, and came rushing to the 
rescue, with buckets and fire extin- 
guishers. 

Lucy was rather frightened at all 
this, and thought on the whole that 
she would not make any more calls 
that day. 

So she went home. And there was 
grandmamma and the doctor and 
mamma, all waiting for her with very 
grave faces. 

The two first had arrived breath- 
less and agitated, inquiring what had 
happened and who was ill. 

Much perplexity followed, and now 
that the author of the mischief had 
arrived, what should be done to her? 

Lucy's fingers went into her mouth, 
and her head went down. 

But she told her story truthfully; 
and it was such a funny one that the 
doctor burst into a roar of laughter, 
and grandmamma laughed heartily, 
and even mamma could not look 
grave. 

So Goosey Lucy had a lecture and 
a New Year's cooky and went to tell 
her dolls all about it, while mamma 
and grandmamma and the doctor 
went to see Aunt Maria. — -Youth's 
Companion. 



RESOLUTION CUSHIONS. 

There was an expectant smile on 
Grandma Bartlett's face. She pulled 
the shade over the lamp and drew the 
curtains shutting her room .in cozily. 
The clock on the mantel was ticking 
the Old Year away as fast as it could 
hurry him off. It was dusk and New 
Year's eve, and that was the time 
for the Pincushion Ceremony at the 
Bartlett's. Fred met Alice on the 
stairs and Belle and Arthur came 



SECURITY 



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AMERICAN EXCHANGE BANK, 

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J. W. case. Manager Havings Department. 



1 



THE SHOW CASES WITH THE PATENTED CLEANING DEVICE. 



HIGH 
POINT 



SHOW CASE WORKS 



Drug Store 
Outfits. 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Dept. A 



along the hall. Belle carried Baby 
Letty in her arms, and they each 
bore a bristling, little red tomato pin- 
cushion in their hands. 

Grandma had placed five hassocks 
in a row. 

"Come, dearies," she called out, to 
Arthur's subdued knock. They filed 
in, laughing. 

"Stools of repentance," cried tall 
Belle, dropping to her hassock. "O, 
grandma, my cushion is full of pins. 
I broke my resolution every other 
day. I resolved to keep my temper, 
you know, and I got so tired of pok- 
ing in a pin for a slip, every night at 
bed time." 

"Look at my lazy pins," mourned 
Fred. 

"And my behind-time stickers," 
chimed in Alice. 

"I didn't think I did put off these 
things so often," sighed Arthur, and 
then baby Letty stuck up her cush- 
ion. It was empty. 

"Now, dears," said grandma, "pro- 
ceed with the ceremony." 

Solemnly they each tumbled their 
pins into a box on the . table. An- 
other stood near it. 

"Why, there is not half as many 
as last year, grandma!" cried Fred. 

"Why! Why! And we all felt so 
bad." 

"Clean cushions again," said grand- 
ma, happily, picking up Letty to hug 
her. "Now for grandma's New 
Year's presents." 

There were beautiful books and 
games. 

"I always feel as if you paid us 
for being naughty," said Alice, look- 
ing up with a smile from her book. 
"I wouldn't part with my Resolution 
Cushion for the world!" 

Arthur looked at his empty cush- 
ion. 

"I'm glad those pins are gone," he 
said. 

"A clean start for a Happy New 
Year. I say, grandma, how we love 
you! " 

And four impetus pair of arms al- 
most smothered dear, gentle grand- 
nia. — -Youth's Companion. 



The Newest Styles ot Jewelry, 

Watches S.erling 5ilver 
and Plated Ware. 

Clocks that will run, and a large assort- 
nie- t nf flue "ocset Bookt, • ut Ulass Ware 
and irnaments We art* the o dest Leadli'g 
Firm In the city. Everything Is guaranteed 

SUHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO. 

Leading Jewelers. 



SHOEING GEESE. 

In Bohemia, when geese are to be 
driven long distances to market, they 
are shod for the journey. The meth- 
od of shoeing is as simple as it is 
Effecting. The geese are made to 
walk repeatedly over patches of tar 
mixed with sand. Thib forms a hard 
crust on their feet, which enables 
them to travel great distances with- 
out becoming sore-footed. — The Pres : 
byterian. 



A little girl came into the room tug- 
ging at the stem of a big rosy apple. 

"Why, daughter," said her mother, 
'what are you trying to do?" 

"Oh, mother, I just can't get the 
cork out." 



you put the life insurmce 
agent off witn the promise or 
next week, next mvn'h cr 
next year do you ev r reflect iow 
very um-ertaln it, is wh, thtr he can 
do you any ;.ood then? 

If you are "live when the time 
co es aro >nd and want the OM- 
PA N V, the Comp i y may n».t want 
Y 1 >U. Any one of « d' ze>i thlt gs msy 
turn up to disqualify j ou for Insur- 
ance. 

* 

That rough may reiurn, or your 

we'ght m v increase or decrease be- 
y "d th ■'. Umiis. or nddei to i none 
too goid fcmliy tecord some of your 
uear r la'lv s may have heen carried 
off by a p ej a lee J m > lady. 



IT IS A GOOD DAY WHEN THE MAN AND 
COMPANY BOTH CONCLUDE THEY 
WANT EACH OTHER 

—and 'Everybody wants the 
NORTHWESTERN now." 
(See our agent NT«. W or write to me 
for rates. 



T A. GARY, 

General Agent, Virginia and North Carolina 
601 MUTUAL BUILDING 
RICHMOND. VIRGINIA 



TERRIBLE CRAMPS 



"My wife," writes Joe Moorhead, 
of Archibald, Okla., "had been troub- 
led with cramps, every month, from 
the time she first came to woman- 
hood. She would be in bed from 
four to seven days at a time. 

"She tried doctor's remedies, but 
they did her no good, so, after many 
years of suffering, I gave her 
CARDTJI, as you directed. After 
she had taken one bottle, she was not 
bothered any more with cramps, and 
now she has a fine boy baby. 

"We recommend Cardui to all wo- 
men who suffer from female troub- 
les." 

Cardui, as you know, is a popular 
medicine with women. It is popu- 
lar because it has been found to re- 
lieve their pains, bring roses to pale 
cheeks, strength to weak bodies and 
nerves. 

Its specific action is on the cause 
of most female ills, and thus, it is 
a medicine especially for women, 
with a record of over 50 years of 
success, in the treatment of troubles 
peculiar to women. 

Cardui is sold at all drug stores, 
with full instructions for use. 

Try Cardui, 



10. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 7, 1909. 



Woma n s F. M. S ociety. 

Conducted by Mrs. L. W. Crawford, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



CHURCH CARPETS 



THOU, O LORD, RE MAI N EST FOR 
EVER. 

Lam. v, 19. 
Amid the rolling years of changing 
time, 

The shifting sands upon the ocean 
shore, 

The coming and the passing, how 
sublime 
This thought — forever more! 

Eternal life, beyond the changing 
years, 

Unfailing Light, across the shifting 
sands, 

Love that 'midst surging waves of 
hopes and fears, 

Like Rock of Ages stands. 
******* 

For ever Thou remainest — Thou 
whose name 
Is Alpha and Omega, First and 
Last, 

Jehovah-Jesus, changelessly the same 
In future, present, past. 

Thou, Lord, remainest; through the 

lifting gates 
Of the New Year we pass; our 

hearts grow strong 
In the blest hope for which creation 

waits, 

The new eternal song. 

— Selected. 



NOTES FROM THE GREENSBORO 
MISSIONARY INSTITUTE. 

Mrs. Mamie A. Wills. 

Greensboro has been enjoying a 
"Feast of Good Things," for the past 
week, and we are eager that other 
cities may obtain such a blessing. 

On Sunday morning it was an- 
nounced that the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society would hold its an- 
nual week of prayer commencing on 
Monday afternoon, and continuing 
to the latter part of the week, in the 
Missionary Institute participated in 
by all denominations, and conducted 
by Mr. Edmund D. Soper, General 
Field Secretary, of the Young Peo- 
ple's Missionary Movement. Dr. W. 
H. Brown, returned missionary from 
the Philippines and Professor Ghist 
Ghee, of the faculty of Soochow Uni- 
versity. 

The service Monday afternoon was 
held in the ladies' parlor of West 
Market Street church. Under the 
guidance of Mrs. F. E. Ross our at- 
tention was directed toward Mexico, 
a field fraught with vital interest to 
us all. , 

The subject for Tuesday afternoon 
was our "Kansas Bible and Training 
School" It was presented by Miss 
Emma Page, teacher of Bible in 
Greensboro Female College, with all 
the enthusiasm of a love-filled stu- 
dent. With her we entered its por- 
tals, greeted by the famous motto, 
"Let Christ be the Head of this Hous- 
hold, the Honored Guest at every ta- 
ble, the Silent Listener to every con- 
versation," which stands there, exer- 
cising its silent influence over the 
student life. 

We noted the extreme cleanliness 
of the building. Why should it not 
be so when the work is done by th'e 
students themselves! In classroom 
we mingled together, even accompan- 
ied the students on their celebrated 
"Friday afternoon visiting campaign. 
Nor were we debarred from the inti- 
mate, sacred circle of prayer. But 
above all, Miss Page impressed us 
with a deep desire to know all of our 
79 missionaries by sight and by 
name, that we might bear them in- 
dividually in our hearts for prayers. 

Wednesday afternoon was devoted 
to the McTyeire Home and School 



for Girls. Mrs. Copeland had noted 
on the board the main facts for con- 
sideration, and around them were 
clustered the contingent thoughts. 
The program concluded with the last 
message from McTyeire, penned by. 
Mrs. S. S. Harris. 

The work of the Institute com- 
menced on Thanksgiving Day, in the 
afternoon and continued through Sat- 
urday. The afternoons were devoted 
to the study of the best plans and 
methods for work in Sunday Schools 
and Young People's Societies. Con- 
spicuous errors were pointed out that 
they might be guarded against. 

On Saturday afternoon the plan 
was varied. Mr. Soper discussing in 
a masterly manner the ever interest- 
ing subject of Giving. His logic was 
convincing, and his treatment so lib- 
eral that we were lifted to a higher 
plane and gifted with a larger vis- 
sion. If all else that he said should 
escape us, may this sentence linger 
long in our memory: "The measure 
of sacrifice is the measure of Chris- 
tian giving." Following this, Dr. 
Brown spoke forcefully of the power 
of prayer. 

The time appointed (Friday morn- 
ing) for the Greensboro District Mis- 
sionary Meeting was most happily 
chosen, for it enabled those in atten- 
dance to hear brief but vital address- 
es from Dr. Brown, Mr. Soper, and 
Professor Gee, an inestimable privi- 
ledge. 

The evening session of the Insti- 
tute opened at 7 o'clock, and for the 
space of an hour, classwork was pur- 
sued. One might choose to study the 
"Frontier," under Mr. Soper; the 
"Moslem World," with Dr. Brown, or 
"China," with Professor Gee, an em- 
barrassment of riches. 

The hour from 8 to 9 each evening 
held a rare treat. 

Thursday Mr. Soper in a most im- 
pressive way called our attention to 
the great crises in this and other 
countries of the world. The supreme 
need in all being the same Christ, 
and the principles He taught, that all 
civilization might be Christian civili- 
zation. The greatness of the work 
of evangelizing the world called for 
great organizations, and unity of ef- 
fort of all who love our Lord. 

A message from the Philippines 
came to us Friday night from the lips 
of Dr. Brown, who had spent some 
years among the natives, so eloquent 
so earnest, it went straight to our 
hearts. Through his vivid descrip- 
tions of these strange lands the peo- 
ple actually moved before us, and we 
joined in their laughter, shedding 
tears in their griefs. 

The closing address Saturday even- 
ing was on China, by Professor Gee. 
His ringing sentences and deep ear- 
nestness claimed our rapt attention, 
and at its close a great gladness fill- 
ed our hearts at the thought of the 
work we are doing in this most im- 
portant field. ' 

The week of prayer and spiritual 
uplift was brought to a close by a 
service of praise on Sunday after- 
noon conducted by Mrs. Lucy H. Rob- 
ertson, at which time she gave us a 
clear, interesting outline of the or- 
ganization and work of the Woman's 
Board of Foreign Missions. 




WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF FURNISHING NEW CHURCHES. 

We have expert men in this Department that we send 
out to make and lay carpets complete in church. Samples 
and estimates sent free for the asking. 

Largest Dealers in Furniture, Carpets, Pianos and Or- 
gans in the State. Write us for our Catalogues. 

PARKER-GARDNER GO., 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



every child of the Highest. And 
these are the jewels of price upon 
which I gaze this New Year's day: 
Health, Opportunity, Ability. 

And this lustrous pearl that men 
have named Health — how often has 
it been cast before the swine of ap- 
petite and pride. How is its beauty 
dimmed, its whiteness sullied. But 
even while I hold it in the light I 
behold its brilliancy returning. I 
will praise thee with my whole heart, 
O Lord, "so shall my light break 
forth as the morning, and my health 
spring forth speedily." 

The second gem in my casket is 
the glowing ruby, which means to 
me the repeated urge to a joyful ser- 
vice, the oft-recurring offer of the 
work that angels covet with veiled 
faces before the ineffable glory. Op- 
portunity how often have I let thee 
slip from my nerveless fingers. Let 
me seize and hold thee fast, while I 
hope for some fresh token of the di- 
vine confidence! 

Ability. Alas, this diamond white 
— this gift of gifts lies in my clasp 
unu-ed and unappreciated. I cannot 
tell at what cost to me and others. 
It is mine — yet not mine, and if I ad- 
venture it not, it will presently van- 
ish altogether, like some bright drop 
of dew, which changes into mist in 
the morning sunlight. 

Angels and ministers of grace 
grant me to know the will of my Fa- 
ther; and knowing, to do it; that I 
may wear the jewels like burning 
lamps through all the days both 
dark and bright of the coming year; 
so shall I find them a mystic amulet 
giving strange vigor to the soul, a 
capable energy to the body, and that 
secret of mystic power which shall 
gird me as with the Life Immortal. 
FLORENCE MORSE KINGSLEY. 



MY TREASURES. 

In the white dawn of the New Year 
I bring forth my treasures, new and 
old, and once again I rejoice in their 
value and in their beauty — for verily 
these are beyond price. Three jew- 
els I hold in my hand — my own pe- 
culiar treasures, yet given also to 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT MEET- 
ING. 

In response to the call of the dis- 
trict secretary, Miss Blanche Carr, 
a small delegation from the societies 
of Greensboro district met in the la- 
dies' parlor of West Market Street 
church on Friday morning, Novem- 
ber 27. 

Mrs. Carr presided over the meet- 
ing, conducting the devotional exer- 
cises. 

Mrs. Lucy H. Robertson addressed 
the meeting, giving an outline of the 
past work of the Woman's Foreign 
Missionary Society in this district, 
and stating the present needs of the 
organization. 

Three gentlemen who were con- 
ducting the Missionary Institute were 



then introduced, making short ad- 
dresses. The information given by 
these brethren, so familiar with for- 
eign fields, the vivid character 
sketches presented by them; their 
edifying words, added intense inter- 
est to the occasion and inspired the 
listeners with a new longing to reach 
out and aid the heathen sister. 

The speakers were: Rev. W. A. 
Brown, from the Philippine Islands; 
Dr. Ghist Gee, of Soochow Univer- 
sity, China; and Rev. Edmund Soper, 
General Secretary of the Young Peo- 
ple's Missionary Movement. 

At the close of the addresses the 
several auxiliaries were represented 
by their delegates. Space forbids a 
fall account of these reports but will 
state that enough money is raised to 
support two missionaries, two Bible 
women, and two scholarships, besides 
a good amount that goes into the gen- 
eral fund each year. 

Mrs. Carr had organized a society 
at Ramseur, which was represented 
by Miss Woosley and Miss Hancock. 

Randleman had no society but it 
was encouraging to note that two del- 
egates, Mrs. E. P. Hays and Mrs. 
Dora Bulla, were present from that 
place. 

The business session ended at 
12:30, and the meeting adjourned in 
order to attend the Missionary Insti- 
tute. 

MRS. J. M. BANDY, 
Cor. Sec. Dist. Meeting. 



THIS WILL INTEREST MANY. 

F. W. Parkhurst, the Boston pub- 
lisher, says that if any one afflicted 
with rheumatism in any form, . neural- 
gia or kidney trouble, will send their 
address to him at 704-35 Carney Bldg., 
Boston, Mass., he will airect them to 
a perfect cure. He has nothing to 
sell or give; only tells you how he was 
cured after years of search for relief. 
Hundreds have tested it with success. 



Trappers— Fur Traders* 

Ship yonr Furs direct to the World's 
largest Fur market, where prices are 
always highest Wri*e for our latest 
Price List, giving the highest prices for 
Furs and Fe^ts of all kinds from all 
sections. It's FREE 

Myers-Boyd Commission Co., St. Louis, Mo. 



BETTER THAN SPANKING. 

Spanking does not cure children of bed- 
wetting. There is a constitutional cause 
for this trouble. Mrs. M. Summers, Sox 
185. South Bend, Ind., will send free to 
any mother her successful home treat- 
ment, with full instructions. Send no 
money, but write her today if your chil- 
dren trouble you in this way. Don't blame 
the child, the chances are it can't help it. 
This treatment also cures adults and aged 
people troubled with urine difficulties by 
day or night. 



•lanuary 7, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



11. 



Woman s H. M. Society. 

Mrs. W. L. Nicholson, Editor, Charlotte, N. C. 



LETTER FROM MRS. MARR. 

Dear Editor: — I enclose a letter 
from Mrs. Marr. 'Tis like her to be 
willing to add to her already over- 
burdened hands and heart. Let us 
bear her up on our prayers continu- 
ally. 

How thankful we are that the 
work does not fall into unaccustom- 
ed hands. We need have no fear 
with her at the helm. 

Yours &c, 
MRS. T. J. COPELAND, 
Corresponding Secretary. 



Dear Sisters of the Woman's Home 
Mission Society. 

I would unite my voice with yours 
in expressing sorrow and regret for 
the loss of our president, Mrs. Frank 
Siler, and doubly so, as the respon- 
sibility of her office falls upon me 
for the time being. 

Mrs. Siler's long experience and 
faithful service eminently qualify 
her for a leader. While her connec- 
tion with our conference is broken 
she will still be identified with the 
same lines of work in her new field. 
May her labors be abundantly bless- 
ed, is the prayer of her sisters of the 
Western North Carolina Conference. 

There is nothing quite so hard as 
to take up the work of another which 
has been suddenly left off, and with- 
out knowing anything of the plans 
try to carry it through to success. 
Fortunately for the work, the year 
is drawing to a close, and we shall 
soon have the opportunity of choos- 
ing a president. Sisters, let us be 
very earnest and diligent in prayer 
that the right woman be sent and 
that we make no mistake in finding 
her. She need not come from among 
the officers, she may never have held 
an office; but she should be a com- 
petent woman who not only loves the 
work, but manifests a deep interest 
in its development and growth. 

I sincerely thank the many sisters 
for their kind words of encourage- 
ment. I never needed them more 
than now. My hands were already 
full to overflowing, and it now seems 
almost impossible to find a place for 
this added duty. But relying upon 
the help of the Father and the co-op- 
eration of the women of the Western 
North Carolina Conference, I will do 
the best I can. 

Yours for service, 

MRS. T. F. MARR. 



How we should rejoice that our 
work falls into experienced hands. 
Let us bespeak, as Mrs. Copeland 
suggests, the prayers of all for all of 
our officers. — Editor. 



A NEW YEAR'S MESSAGE. 

My dear friends and co-workers: — 
Ere the sound of the bells die in your 
ears as they ring out "the old year," 
a message of love to each of you, I 
would send. On this quiet December 
evening, while hearts are still aglow 
with the thoughts of the "Messenger 
of Peace," your faces one by one rise 
before me and a feeling of gladness 
takes possession of me. To each one 
I send a happy, a glad, New Year's 
greeting. First of all to the new 
president, who at the beginning of 
this year enters upon her work of 
leadership in our Home Mission 
ranks under such auspicious circum- 
stances; to the vice-presidents, 
whose respective departments lie at 
the very foundation of our structure, 
to the recording secretary, who has 
endeared herself to the workers not 
only for what she has done, but for 



her own attractive personality; to 
the corresponding secretary, whose 
words and works inspire us to the 
best in us, and who feels nearer to 
us just now because through the 
"deep waters" which threatened to 
engulf her during the past year, God 
has graciously led her and left her 
strengthened for the conflict; to our 
treasurer, who has served faithfully 
no.t only at "the tables," but also in 
"spiritual things"; to the Brevard 
treasurer, who allows neither busi- 
ness nor pleasure to deflect her from 
the path of duty, but like Paul who 
said, "This one thing I do," goes 
straight ahead in labor for the girls 
at Brevard, many of whose lives are 
a mute appeal to us; to the superin- 
tendent of supplies, whose hand 
guides in bringing joy to cheerless 
homes and in relieving "suffering hu- 
manity's needs." 

To each of the secretaries who are 
bravely leading their districts to 
greater heights, and especially greet- 
ings to that host of private members 
who have made possible the achieve- 
ments of the officers. Many, many 
times, both officials and privates, you 
have cherished me with loving per- 
sonal messages, and saved me from 
discouragement. May the New Year 
bring you all an abundant harvest of 
blessings from God's great store- 
house, and such joy as you have nev- 
er before known.. 



THE UNKNOWN FUTURE. 

It is appropriate that we should 
face a New Year thoughtfully. What 
it will bring to us we con not even 
guess. Like the Israelites of old, we 
are about to enter a land of which we 
know nothing. We recall the words 
of that true and trusted leader, Josh- 
ua, "Ye have not passed this way 
heretofore." Doubtless many of 
those Israelites, recalling the ex- 
periences of the wilderness, 
had grave doubts about this land into 
which they were being led. Possibly 
some of you, grieving over the fail- 
ures of the past year, enter upon the 
new with grave apprehension. Re- 
member this, however, failure as the 
world looks at it is not always God's 
standard, and "There -are are some 
kinds of failure better than success." 

The only thing we should be anx- 
ious about as we enter the new year 
is to have a disposition submissive 
to God's will, so that His plan for 
us may not be marred in any way. 
With that disposition the New Year 
will be famous for the peace of mind 
in which we live. It will be noted 
for the faithfulness with which we 
do our work; for the kindly graces 
of character which we develop in 
ourselves, and for the good cheer we 
spread among our fellow men. 

It is all important that we start 
the year aright. No doubt many of 
us will enter it with fear and tremb- 
ling. Instead then of asking the Lord 
for temporal blessings, let us implore 
Him for wisdom to guide us aright 
and walk in the way which He leads. 
Then will come to us blessings of 
which we have never dreamed. 
"I know not where I am going, 
But well do I know my guide," 
is a very comforting assurance as 
we stand on the threshhold of this 
New Year. 

No doubt there will come to us 
sore trials and temptations, but we 
are nowhere in the Bible promised 
exemption from them. We take lease 
of sorrow only when we take lease 
of life. But it will do no good to have 
forebodings of future evil. If we con- 



commit our ways unto the Lord He 
will provide a way of escape from 
every temptation and strength to en- 
dure every conflict. When trouble 
comes, like Paul we will find, "My 
peace is sufficient for thee." 

As we read again Joshua's words 
so pregnant with meaning, "Ye have 
not passed this way heretofore," 
there will come also that kindred 
thought, "We shall never pass this 
way again." This, then, is our only 
opportunity to do certain things. All 
about us are needs that we ought to 
relieve, sorrow that we only can sol- 
ace, cold hearts that turn to us for 
/comfort, perplexed ones whom we 
should guide into the path of Him 
who said "I am the way." Let us 
adopt the motto of the good old 
Quaker, who said: 
"I shall pass through this life but 
once 

Any good therefore that I can do, 
Any kindness that I can show 
Let me do it now. 
Let me not delay it nor neglect it 
For I shall not pass this way again." 

Certainly, then, as I wish for you 
a happy New Year, I wish for you 
a year filled with useful kindly deeds. 
As Home Mission workers we can 
look toward the future very hopeful- 
ly, but never have we been confront- 
ed larger responsibilities or more 
marvelous opportunities. With a 
courage, the offspring of unfaltering 
faith, with a love begotten of Him 
who "first loved us," and with a zeal 
"born of knowledge" let us enter up- 
on its duties and privileges joyously, 
glad to be even a "doorkeeper in the 
house of our Lord." 

Yours in loving service, 

EFFIE SQUIRES NICHOLSON. 



TO DRIVE OUT MALARIA AND BUILD 
UP THE SYSTEM. 

Take the Old Standard Grove's Taste- 
less Chill Tonic. You know what you are 
taking. The formula is plainly printed 
on every bottle, showing It Is simply 
Quinine and Iron in a tasteless form, 
and the most effectual form. For grown 
people and children. 50c. 



DIFFICULT CASE OF ECZEMA 
CURED. 

"I have been afflicted with eczema 
for the past year; was under the care of 
a physician all that time. I have used 
your Soap and Tetterine for three 
weeks and am entirely well. I am a 
lady eighty-four years old." 

Miss Sarah A. Dean, Myricks, Mass. 

Tetterine cures Eczema, Tetter, Ring 
Worm, Ground Itch, Infant's Sore Head, 
Pimples, Boils, Rough Scaly Patches on 
the Face, Old Iitchlng Sores, Dandruff, 
Cankered Scalp, Bunions, Corns, Chil- 
blains, and every form of Skin Disease. 
Tetterine, 50c; Tetterine Soap, 25c. 
Your druggist, or by mail from the man- 
ufacturer, The Shuptrine Co., Savan- 
nah, Ga. 



Medical Relief Free. 

Dr. J. A. Willis, of Crawfordsville, 
Ind., will mail free to all sending him 
their addresses a package of PANSY 
COMPOUND, a pure vegetable remedy 
which is a positive relief for constipa- 
tion, indigestion, dyspepsia, rheumatism 
and la grippe. 



WANTED. 

Responsible man with horse and bug- 
gy in each community, salary $5.00 to 
$10.00 per day, to take ord.ers from own- 
ers of Farms, Orchards, and Home Gar- 
dens. A splendid opportunity for far- 
mer's sons, also fruit tree and sewing 
machine agents, to make a business con- 
nection which will become more profita- 
ble each year. Address P. O. Box 670, 
Young's Island, S. C. 



CHAS. W. MOSELEY,M.D. 

Practice Limited to 

Diseases of Stomach and Intestines 

Opposite Guilford Hotel 
OVER FARISS-KLUTZ DRUG CO., 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Office Phone 571 yf Residence 1345 
Office : 221 S. ELM STREET. 
Hours 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
2 p. m. to 5 p. m. 




If you used your tools as often 
as a carpenter does his — they'd 
never rust. Just before putting 
them away, rub a few drops of 
Household Lubricant overthem. 
Then they'll keep their edge 
and won't rust. 

HOUSEHOLD 
Lubricant 

should be used for 
everything about the 
house that needs oiling 
— for sewing; machines, 
bicycles, clothes wring- 
ers, etc. It will not 
corrode or turn 
rancid. Sold by 
dealers everywhere 
in the handy can 
that can be closed 
with its own spout. 
STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

( INCORPORATED J 




Weel AUoj e u.urch and Sohool Bella. arSend for 
<0muio™» The C. ft BBLI. CO- fr.Out».~..o. 



DO YOU READ gsgj 

Woman's Home Companion $1.25 
McClures Magazine - - - 1 .50 
Success Magazine - - - 1.00 

Totalof Publisher price $3.75 
Woman's Home Companion $1.25 ) Our Price 
Success Magazine - - - 1.00 )j g;j 

Carolina Magazine Subscription Agency, 
Send lor cat. Box 295, Anderson. S. C 



Our Price 

$2.50 



ST1EFFS 

LATEST WONDER! 



THE 

Miniature Grand 

Just think,— a wee little 
grand piano only 5 ft. long! 
A wee little grand piano, so 
small it requires only a little 
more space than an upright, 
yet contains all the tonal 
beauties and the perfect ac- 
tion of the large grand and 
a wonderful volume. 

Small enough for the 
smallest parlor; tone enough 
for the largest parlor. 

Costs little more than an 
upright piano, and within 
reach of the most economi- 
cal buyer. 



CHAS. M. STIEFF 

Manufacturer of the 
ARTISTIC STIEFF, SHAW, & 
STIEFF SELF-PLAYER 
PIANOS. 



Southern Wareroom 

5 West' Trade St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

C. H. WILMOTH, Mgr. 



12. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 7, 1909. 



How to Get Rid 
of Cata rrh 

A Simple, Safe, Reliable Way. 
and it Costs Nothing to Try. 

Those who suffer from catarrb 
know its miseries. There is no need 
of this suffering. You can get rid of 
it by a simple, safe, inexpensive, home 
treatment discovered by Dr. Blosser, 
who, for over thirty-four years, has 
been treating catarrh successfully. 

His treatment is unlike any other. 
It is not a spray, douche, salve, cream, 
or inhaler, but is a more direct and 
thorough treatment than any of them. 
It cleans out the head, nose, throat 
and lungs so that you can again 
breathe freely and sleep without that 
stopped-up feeling that all catarrh 
sufferers have. It heals the diseased 
membranes and makes a radical cure, 
so that you will not be constantly 
blowing your nose and spitting, and 
at the same time it does not poison 
the system and ruin the stomach, as 
internal medicines do. 

If you want to test this treatment 
without cost, send your address to Dr. 
J. W. Blosser, 204 Walton street. 
Atlanta, Ga., and he will send you by 
return mail enough of the medicine 
to satisfy you that it is all he claims- 
for it as a remedy for catarrh, ca- 
tarrhal headaches, catarrhal deafness, 
asthma, bronchitis, colds and all ca- 
tarrhal complications. He will also 
send you free an illustrated booklet. 
Write him immediately. 



The Sunday School Lesson. 



LESSON II— JANUARY 10, 1909. 
The Descent of the Holy Spirit. 

(Acts 2, 1-11.) 
Time — A. D. 30. Place — Jerusalem. 



100 
FINE ;-: PIGS 

ON HAND. 

Order before they are 
picked over. 

John A. Young, 

GREENSBORO, N C 



THIS SPACE BELONGS 

Robt. W. Murray 
General Insurance 

308 1-2 SOUTH ELM ST., 
Greensboro, N. C. 

PHONE . 163 




IMADEH2^ 

Selling This 7-Piece Kitchen Set" 

From sworn etatement of E. J3. CUNNINGHAM. 

AGENTS 

are coining money — 
Belling from 50 to 500 
sets per "week. You 
can do it. Send your 
address today and let 
us PROVE IT. Experi- 
ence unnecessary. Wo 
show you how to make 
$3 to $10 a day. OUT- 
FIT FREE to workers. 
THOMAS MFG. CO. 
466 Home Bldg. 
Dayton, Ohio 



Golden Text. — I will pray the Fath- 
er, and He shall give you another 
Comforter that he may be with you 
f'.rever; even the Spirit of Truth. — 
.'ichn 14, 16-17. 




£,000 io 1,500 KSiin. 
8;le3 per boar with 

DeLOACH JACK 

SHINGLE MILL. 

Will cut shingles fr m 
eith er squ are or round 
blocks. The carriage 
is mounted on 4-incli rollers. Two changes of 
speed, — by pressing foot lever carriage goes 
forward; relieve the pressure, carriage re- 
turns with double speed of forward motion. 
The machine can easily be converted into a 
first class bolter, will carry a 30-inch saw. 

Write for a catalogue of the celebrated 
DeLoach line of Saw Mills, Gang ledgers, 
Trimmers, Shinjrle Mills, Lath. Mills, Planers, Corn 
Mills, Water Wheels, Engines, Boilers, and Gasoline 
Enginea Agents wanted in every county. 

DeLoach Mill Manufacturing Co. 

Box 777, BRIDGEPORT, ALA. 



The Incident. 

It Is all such easy reading. The 
disciples, still at Olivet, were gazing 
into the unanswering blue Dehind 
which Jesus had seemed to disappear. 
By their side stood "two men in 
white," who reminded them that 
obedience was still the first duty of a 
disciple to his Master. Jesus was 
gone. But he had left instructions 
that the disciples should tarry in 
Jerusalem. Obviously, then, there 
was no piety in looking into heaven 
at Olivet when their orders were to 
report in Jerusalem,. The contem- 
plative mood has its fascinations. 
There is a real and peculiar delight 
in being on the mount. But contem- 
plation and ecstasy have little value 
apart from the active benevolence to 
which they should furnish inspira- 
tion. It is well to "go apart awhile" 
and commune with God. But such an 
exercise is shorn of much of its rel- 
ish, and nearly all of its power, when 
it is regarded as an end in itself. 
We seek fellowship for power as well 
as for joy and peace; and we receive 
power for divinely ordained tasks in 
the accomplishing of which we ex- 
perience added joy and peace. 

In Jerusalem the disciples resorted 
naturally to "the upper chamber," 
where we are told "they were abid- 
ing." By this we are to understand 
not that this was the lodging place 
of the disciples, but the habitual 
place of resort for the one hundred 
and twenty. Here they were accus- 
tomed to gather for prayer, and here 
they patiently and prayerfully await- 
ed the coming of the Lord. 

Then comes the day of Pentecost. 
It fell fifty days after the Passover, 
ten after the ascension of Jesus. The 
scene is easily reproduced. In the 
"upper chamber" the disciples to the 
number of over one hundrd were 
,come together for prayer. Among 
them, as Luke is particular to re- 
mark, are "the women and Mary the 
mother of Jesus." , These all with 
one accord were continuing steadfast- 
ly in prayer (1, 14). While they were 
at prayer there came suddenly, as out 
of heaven itself, a report which "fill- 
ed all the house"; the sound was as 
"of the rushing of a mighty wind." 
Instantly, also, a flame of fire irradi- 
ated the room and, to the astouished 
gazs of the disciples, the fire seemed 
to divide itself into tongues of flame 
which sat, as it were, on each one of 
them. Thereupon the company, with 
access of po"wer which no one was 
quite able to control began to speak 
in languages foreign to those with 
which they were familiar; and, more- 
over, when a great crowd had come 
together, brought thither by a report 
of the supernatural signs displayed 
upon the disciples, it was disclosed 
that visitors from abroad heard their 
own language or dialect from the lips 
of untutored Galileans. It is not sur- 
prising that they were amazed and per- 
plexed, saying one to another, What 
meaneth this? Their explanation was 
not particularly illuminating. And to 
the charge drunkenness Peter replied 
first that no pious Jew ever tourhed 
wine before the hour of the morning 
sacrifice; and secondly, that had they 



only recalled their own scriptures 
they would have found in the .scene 
but the fulfillment of Joel's prophecy, 
that in "the last days" God would 
pour forth His spirit upon all I esh so 
that Israel's sons and daugnters 
should prophesy, her youth Sxiould 
see visions, and her veterans dream 
dreams. 

The Gift of the Spirit. 

Just what are we to understand by 
the phenomena? Aside from Peter's 
plain words that it was God's spirit 
poured forth upon the people there is 
no explanation. The wisdom of the 
psychologist does not compass all the 
mysteries of spirit, and there is noth- 
ing irrational in believing that if 
men and women can influence other 
men and women by word and look, by 
thought and intercessory prayer, per- 
haps the spirit of God can be no less 
personal or powerful. That there is 
a divinity that shapes our ends: that 
there are intangible, invisible, but 
very real powers at work upon us all, 
leading us upward or downward, 
molding our thoughts and directing 
our action — this is no longer in dis- 
pute among thoughtful people. It is 
necessary, therefore, only to disasso- 
ciate the fact from certain accidental 
accompaniments of the fact — the 
noise, the flame, the alien speech — 
to put ourselves into the same rela- 
tion to it that obtained among the 
disciples on that memorable day of 
Pentecost. Note no\y: 

1. That this new power came to 
the disciples obedient to the word of 
the Master. They were in Jerusalem 
at His word; they were in prayer by 
His word and example; they were in 
holy expectation because they believ- 
ed His romise of the spirit. More- 
over, they were providentially at a 
crisis in the history of the new move- 
ment. Apart from this endueinent 
they must remain dumb and power- 
less; the movement would wane and 
disappear. Wonder^, which to a more 
sophisticated people, would only pro- 
voke questionings and debate, were 
to them the signs of God's presence 
and favor. God adapts His revela- 
tions to the needs and uses of che 
hour or of the age. The descent of 
the Spirit as it has been witnessed in 
the revivals under Wesley and White- 
field, under Edwards and Tennent, 
under Finney and Moody, and in the 
more recent Welsh revival — sucn a 
visitation of the Spirit is just as real 
just as divine as the display at Jeru- 
salme on Pentecost. The accompani- 
ments were less startling, but not less 
compelling or convincing. It is not 
in sound or flame or in gifts of 
tongues that the demonstration of 
spiritual power consists, but in the 
miracle of the changed purpose, of 
"the subdued heart, of the evil pas- 
sions cast out, of the daily walk in 
mercy, 1 ve and truth. 

2. Note, also, that spiritual en- 
dueinent is the condition of moral ef- 
ficiency. It is not in education or in 
civilization to make men holy or keep 
them righteous. Nor is it in culture 
or in social refinement to beget in 
man the passion for humanity. With- 
out the experience of Pentecost Peter 
and his colleagues would in all prob- 
ability have gone back to Galilee, 
cherished in quiet and in secret the 
memory of a beloved but misguided 
Teacher, and died respectable and re- 
spected citizens of their native town. 
From that moment the love of Christ 
constrained them in an irresistible 
way to the proclamation of the good 
tidings which should be to all peo- 
ple. It was not simply that Peter and 
the rest became successful speakers. 



The enduement enabled them do 
doubt to hold their own against the 
controversialists of their day, out 
something more than that was need- 
ed. The need then as it is now was 
for some power to make and keep a 
man in his daily life the unmistaka- 
ble and wholly intelligible witness to 
a power from above directing and im- 
pelling him to noblest ends and is- 
sues. That was what was involved 
in Pentecost. The descent of the 
Spirit meant that for humanity 
there was a new hope and a new 
source of power, in virtue of which 
and by the power of which a man 
might grow from grace to grace un- 
til he had come to the perfect full- 
ness of the stature of the man Christ 
Jesus. And that is the significance 
of the Pentecost for us. — New York 
Christian Advocate. 



JELL-O 

One of the Ladies' Choice 

Recipes. 

Every one of the seven Jell-O 
flavors is so good that, as ex- 
plained in a former announcement, 
no one has ever yet been able to 
determine which is best, and no 
mistake is possible if a choice is 
made at random. 

With a great many ladies the 
Chocolate flavor is especially pop- 
ular. One of the favored recipes 
is this one for 

CHOCOLATE WALNUT JELL-O. 

Dissolve one package Chocolate Jell-O 
in one pint of boiling water. When it 
begins to harden, add one-half cup Eng- 
lish walnut meats and half a dozen figs 
cut up fine. Set away to become firm 
and serve with whipped cream. 

Jell-0 flavors are : 
Chocolate, 
Lemon, . 
Peach, 
Cherry, 
Strawberry, 
Raspberry and 
Orange. 

10c. a package, at 
all grocers. 

Illustrated 

Recipe £ook r 
free. 

The Genesee Pare Food Co., Le Roy, N. Y# 

DEGENERATES 

Alcohol by over-stimulation produces 
degeneracy. Opium and other narcotics 
by under-estimation also produces degen- 
eracy. 

But Malaria Is the father and mother 

of an army of degenerates and it blazes 
the trail for all those men who can't 
ma ke pood. 

The sin of Malaria is degeneracy. 

Wake up. Break your oonds. Rid your 
system of the CURSE of Malaria. 

Johnson's Tonic will drive out every 
trace and taint of Malaria from the 
blood. 

Price 25 and 50 cents. 

The Johnson's Chill and Fever Tonic Co., 
Savannah, Ga. 

Hitchcock-Trotter Co* 

("A Store for Women") 

Specialists In Ready-to-Wear Garments 
for Women and Missess 

Dress Goods. Dry Goods, Millinery and 
Ladles' Furnishings. 

Requests for s m pies, and all mail orders 
promptly nlled same day received. 

Hi cheocR-Trotter Co. 
"On the Square." 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Mine. Hancock Dressmaking Parlors- 

Cured; quick relief; re- 
IlKllr.NY to 20 days; 30 to 60 days 
1/1 WA Ul moevs all swelling in 8 
effects permanent cure. Trial treatment 
given free to sufferers; nothing fairer. 
For circulars, testimonials and free trial 
treatment write 

Dr. H. H. Green's Sons, Box X, 
Atlanta, Ga. 




January 7, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRTSTTAN ADVOCATE. 



is 



The Farm and Garden. 



TO GET WINTER EGGS, HAVE 
GOOD HOUSES. 

This is a good time to be thinking 
about whether the chickens are prop- 
erly housed. Good housing will have 
much to do with their winter laying. 
Getting winter eggs shows that a 
poultryman is a good one. Anybody 
can get eggs in spring and early 
summer; but in winter when prices 
are high, is the time that eggs pay 
well. Good feed is very important 
but for the money invested, good 
housing will give better results, and 
is more often neglected. 

Fine looking hen houses are not 
necessary. I have seen very practi- 
cal hen houses built of old straw. 
They kept the layers dry and kept 
off drafts. The houses were kept 
reasonably clean and the comfort of 
the fowls always had attention. When 
these points are covered, the poultry- 
man who keeps chickens merely for 
the money he can make need not 
worry about other points in the 
house. If hens must roost in trees 
or on fences, too much of their vi- 
tality is used up in resisting the ele- 
ments and they do not turn enough 
of their food into eggs. If hens sleep 
in open sheds their condition is not 
much improved. They need fresh 
air — lots of it; but nothing is gained 
by subjecting them to drafts or breez- 
es in cold or damp weather. Bu-ild 
the house of whatever material may 
be most convenient. Rather than go 
without a good hen house, build it 
of sod. Many good hen houses are 
built of sod in the West. A house 
built of this will keep out drafts and 
make the layers very comfortable. 

A Cheap and Serviceable House. 

It is not necessary to build a double 
walled house, if the single wall is 
close enough to keep out drafts. One 
of the best poultry houses I ever saw 
was built by and for a man who was 
making a specialty of winter eggs 
in a cold climate. He put his up- 
rights for the building in place, then 
with broadheaded tacks fastened sin- 
gle-ply tar roofing paper on the outer 
side of the uprights. Over this roof- 
ing paper ship lap siding was nailed. 
After the siding was nailed on, the 
tar paper was fastened to the sid- 
ing, by using laths between the up- 
rights. This makes an expensive 
wall that will not permit drafts to 
enter. If one desired to put a little 
more money into a building, he. could 
put on one thickness of boards, apply 
light roofing or even building paper 
on the boards, and then nail on an- 
other thickness of boards. If the 
roof is made of building paper, it, too, 
will prevent drafts; and the roof can 
be made rather flat. Indeed, most 
roofing paper will give better service 
if the roof is not very steep, for the 
reason that the composition on the 
paper may melt and run off in hot 
weather if the roof is steep. 

A farmer should carry one hundred 
laying hens. A house that is 12 to 
16 feet wide and 20 to 25 feet long 
will be large enough for this number. 
Have the roof slope to the north and 
have all opening on the southside. 
If necessary, place the door on one 
end close to the southside. Make the 
back wall 4 1-2 to 5 feet high and rhe 
south, or front wall 7 to 9 feet. Place 
the windows high, so that the sun- 
shine will reach far back into the 
building when the sun is low during 
the winter. Part or all. of the win- 
dows may have cloth substituted for 
the glass. The cloth will permit fcul 
gases in the house to pass through 
and will allow the pure gases from 
the outside to pass in. Use heavy 



canvass or burlap for this cloth, and 
do not be afraid to make the opening 
large enough. If it occupies half or 
even all of the southside of the build- 
ing, it will not be too large, if the 
other three sides of the building and 
the roof are made so tight that drarts 
cannot sweep through. Ventilating 
a chicken house through a cloth win- 
dow or a cloth door is one of the 
best improvements that has been 
made in poultry culture of recent 
years. 

Keep the Roosts Away From the Wall 

Place the roosts in the back half 
of the house, and let them run paral- 
lel with it. Place all the roosts on 
the same level and about half way 
between the earth floor and the roof. 
A 2x4 with the edges rounded make 
fine roosts. Place the roosts 12 to 
15 inches apart, depending on the 
size of the fowls, and have them 8 
to 12 inches above the dropping 
board. Do not have the roosts closer 
than 18 to 24 inches to any outside 
wall of the house. It would make 
a fowl too cold on one side if roost- 
ing close to a wall. Suspend the 
roosts from the rafters or hinge 
them above a dropping board so that 
they can be treated on the under side 
for mites. If a dropping board is 
used, swing the roosts upward out 
of the way will make it more con- 
venient to clean the dropping board. 

Make nests with a passage way be- 
tween them and an outside wall, so 
they will be somewhat private. They 
will appeal to old Biddy if made this 
way, and their rather dark condition 
will tend to prevent egg eating. The 
front side or the top of the nests may 
consist of a hinged door through 
which eggs may be gathered. Some 
will prefer to put the nests under the 
dropping board, which has something 
in its favor. 

A house of the size suggested will 
be large enough to permit of litter 
being used in the front part for the 
chickens to scratch grain out of. — 
Progressive Parmer. 



RAISE YOUR OWN MEAT. 

Years ago I wrote of visiting a 
man's farm, where all the land was 
in cotton right up to the house stand- 
ing unpainted in a bare field. A 
hopeless-looking woman was frying 
some Western bacon for the dinner, 
while the man toiled in the cotton. 
And I got to thinking over the mat- 
ter. There was no stock on the place 
but the mules that worked the cot- 
ton. And as I saw that bacon, I 
thought that some farmer out West 
raised that hog, and probably made 
something out of it. Some railroad 
carried it to Chicago, and certainly 
made money. Some packer bought 
and cured the meat, and grew to be 
a millionaire. Another railroad 
brought it South and paid dividends 
by doing it. Some merchant bought 
it, and sold it to that man out there 
in the cotton field at a big profit — 
and he works all summer in the cot- 
ton making all these people prosper- 
ous out of his one crop, while at the 
end of the year he is as poor as ever, 
and his land grows less and less pro- 
ductive, while he might have made 
all these profits himself in raising the 
bacon at home. 

The western farmer makes corn, 
the railroads haul it, the merchant 
buys it, and sells it to the man who 
could raise the corn at more profit 
than the Western farmer if he im- 
proved his land. Yet, he goes on in 
the old hopeless way imagining that 
cotton is the only thing to get money 
out of, and that corn, oats, and wheat 



are only supplies, and the Western 
farmer gets rich supplying him. 

When will the cotton farmer get 
out of this slavery to everybody else? 
Not till he goes to farming just as 
the Northern and Western farmer 
do. He has a crop that is far supe- 
rior as a money crop to any they 
have, and a crop that fits into an 
important rotation of crops fully as 
well as any they have North or West, 
and while they get rich in sending 
him "supplies" he gets poor furnish- 
ing the crop that maintains the trade 
between this country and 
Europe, and selling the cottonseed 
that fatten the cattle that make the 
meat he buys in various forms. 

Now, then, is the time to resolve 
to change all this. Plan a rotation 
for your farm and stick to it, grow 
plenty of forage and make manure 
and when you once have manure 
enough to cover a cornfield, you will 
be on the road out of this slavery to 
the North and West. 

Nine-tenths of the letters I get 
from farmers ask what fertilizer I 
shall use for this, that or the other 
crop, when the man who farms right 
will need to buy little, and that only 
of the mineral forms of acid phos- 
phate and potash, or but one of these, 
perhaps. 

I have been hammering away at 
this for many years, and yet how few 
have taken the idea. But I do hear 
now and then from farmers who have 
broken loose from the old ruts, and 
are succeeding. Would to God that 
I could get all of them to do so! — 
Progressive Farmer. 




I^oURANJl 

0. W. CAKR & COMPANY, 

Office: McADOO BUILDING 

(Next co tne Post office. 



FIRE INSURANCE.] 
Tornado, Plate Glass 

Accident aad Sick. Benefit 

Steam Boiler. 

^^^^^^^^^^ 

Ns (incorporated ) V^__ 

CAPITAL STOCK. $30,001). 
RIIQIWFQQ _ When you think of coins: to schoo'. 
DUOII1 LOO write for Cata orur and Special Of- 
fers of the Leading ISusiness and Shorthand Schools 
Address.!. H KING. lYes tUtit King's Business Cohere 
Raleieh, N. Cor Char otte. N. C. 

We also teach Bookkeeping, Shorthand. I'enmanshtL' 
etc., by mail. Send for Home Study Circular. 



regory 



GOWAN'S 

Hrt- p i ration prevents and cure? 
Croup, ' olds, Pneumonia and 
all diseases where ii flanirnati'n 
is the cause Your du'y is to 
k^ep a b"ttle in the home. 
Ext rnal All rruggists 25c; 
50c; #1 00 Buy to d»y. 




.THIS 



~ ]for seijinn i-t.v -j w lioxe* *'MerIt' 

jj Blood TjftUbts i days uiiowod to- 
-jgjfsell Tablets, return ni'-ney nrd Kefc 
ik£ij33EBBy Ting. Address "Merit" Medicine Co. 

_Kuom 80 o Cincinnati, Onio.C$ 



arc raised v/iih Ihcprcatost'eare from 
superior liand-scloctp' I stock as id sold 
i nder (line warrants eovoririg all 
i isles. Th;s year we are oh'cring 

YclSow Globe Onions 

at the remarkably low price of $2.33 a 
ponnd. Sold f >r $fi.co la«t year. Our 
Packages of vegetable roods arc larger t 
year, and our 

NZV/ SEED BOOK— FREE 

In "K*fc ^\ tolls about the special cash discounts 
kvt^K*y/.\ v.earo making. This book is aninvalu- 
ra^KSOTSiffl ftDleeuidelo farmers and gardeners. 
Gfa \ Send for copy to-day. 

J. J. II. (;.;r.<. <»ky & SON, 

Uarblehead, Mass. 



fe» B sal a /pg^EWESTEl, KOEE 3D3- 

OKS3Brf H jB&SMi ABLE, LOWEE PEICE. 

, KJXiIjS.^^ TELLS WET. 
rite ts CincinpalU Bell Foundry Co_ Cincinnati. 0. 




Write for My Introductory Offer on a Fine 
Sample EPW0RTH PIANO or ORGAN 

I om sending some of the finest, sweetest-toned 
Ep worth Pianos and Organs wo make into many 
communities as samples of our work. It's our 
special way of advertising', as we have no agents 
^s^ L, or stores. If you write at once, I will tell you bow 
jSgs^V^you can try one of these fiuesample instruments 
l^^j ia your own home entirely at our expense of 




^jjp%zr? freight and all. Then, after you've tried it for 
a m.")iit!i or sj — after you've had your friends 
try it — alter you've tested its easy action— after 
you've enjoyed its rieh, sweet tone for which 
Epworth Pianos and Organs are celebrated — after 
you are convinced that— all in all— it's one of the 
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ever saw or heard, then, if you wish, you may 
buy it at our special introductory price and take 

Your Choice cf 27 Plans of Easy Payment 

on the piano or of five p^ans on organ. Yon niay select the plan that's easiest for you and. . .. . 
wowill trust you, no malter whore >""U live. I guarantee each sample piano and organ (') in-''- 
as fine as those I made for the fumous song writers. Prof. E. O. Kxoell, Prof. Cll. Onbriel, 
of other well-known musicians you will find in the free book we are going to sen 1 vou. This is tho best 
ever have to get a fine piano or organ on your own terms. WRITE A POSTAL OR LETTER TODAY and say 
Sample Offer, Plans of Easv Payment and Book about. Ntate which book— piano or nmr I." Arid 
6E H. il. WlLUA IS, Vice-lVrs., Willi nns Organ & Piano Co.. Room 21-> . 57 





pon't sit arpund'the strive, and freeze 
\all'i iwinter/— 'y/ouf 'fdee roasting and 

^dtiMtQy^'/bu^^hmre- coal, givestf 
J ~' A jiA&fc^lfae. ^rouble, 
Bjajt^sv piare^ ^dirtM 
»5f/lgi>ei less,] 
ht^t^tb^rijjn eof 
oirr^Sgt^ater 
6r^tealn \ Sy s- 



your Jious£. 
give a healthful^ r 
temperature tbrough<: 
A postal brings our caialoa^e 

• CRAWFOkD, / / .' 

Winston-Salem, N. C\ 

,. JJrccgs € co- 




mm 



14. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 7, 190&. 



Our Dead. 



"I am the resurrection and the Life." 
— Jesus. 

We will Insert an obituary of 150 words 
free of charge. For the excess of 150 
words we charge one cent per word. 
Count the words in excess and send th« 
money with obituary. Observe this rule, 
please. Oo not put In original poetry. 

The above also applies to Tributes of 
Respect. 



Sweeney. — Gordon, infant son of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Sweeney, died 
December 11, 1908, aged one year, 11 
months, and 11 days. 

Gordon and his mother were on 
the front porch. The mother stepped 
back through the hall to the kitchen 
for something, thinking the baby 
would remain till she would return. 
But he loved to follow close in moth- 
er's "footprints," went into the hall 
and then into a bedroom where there 
was an open fireplace, and caught 
his clothing on fire. The mother 
hearing him cry ran to him, tried to 
smother the flames out with her own 
clothing, receiving bad burns on her 
own person. She succeeded in get- 
ting the blaze out, but he was so 
badly burned that Christ came with- 
in twenty-four hours and took his 
sweet little spirit home with him. 

While on earth he followed moth- 
er, now mother must follow him. 
A true sympathizer, 

A. FRIEND. 



Ross. — Doctor Montgomery Ross 
was born March 19, 1836, and died a 
most triumphant death November 
23, 1908. For many long years 
Brother Ross had been a consistent 
member of the M. E. Church, South, 
most of the time filling the office of 
steward, and he manifested a lively 
interest in its affairs to the last. He 
had been a constant reader of the 
Advocate for years, and hence was 
well posted in the movements of his 
church. 

In 1855 he was married to Caroline 
Smith, which happy union was bless- 
ed with seven children, three of 
whom preceded the father into the 
world beyond. The helpmeet, who 
had walked by his side for fifty-three 
years, and four of the children re- 
main, not to "mourn their loss," but 
to rejoice in his great gain. Brother 
Ross's life was an example of that 
simple trust in God and contentment 
that is so much needed today. He 
had but little of this world's goods, 
and he had but little of the care and 
worry that the world gives. He had, 
perhaps, not even a cottage that he 
could call his own, but he could talk 
about the mansions in .his Father's 



house, and rejoice in the hope of the 
same. He frequently spoke of his 
readiness to die, and praised God for 
the prospects of an early departure. 
Death like this is not to be dreaded. 

H. C. SPRINKLE, 

Pastor. 



Stiles. — J. R. Stiles was born June 
23, 1847, and died November 23, 1908. 

He married Miss Susan Abernethy, 
and to them was born a large family 
of children, every one of whom is an 
honor to an honorable parentage. In 
early life he joined the Methodist 
church at Concord, on the Catawba 
circuit. At the time of his death he 
was a member of the Methodist 
church at Davidson, N. C. Brother 
Stiles was a loyal Methodist, true to 
his obligations, always a true friend 
and loyal to his pastor, even among 
the number of those who regard 
their church obligations and mem- 
bership as something sacred. As a 
Christian, his virtues shone most 
brilliantly. He bore a good name 
wherever known. Though his afflic- 
tion was long and painful, he did not 
complain, but was always hopeful of 
recovery until the inevitable end was 
seen, and 'then he was ready and .ev- 
en anxious for his final release. In 
'the (presence of his family and a 
large concourse of sympathizing rel- 
atives and friends his body was laid 
to rest in the cemetery at Concord 
church, there to await the first call 
of the trumpet that shall call back 
to life the sleeping forms of those 
who sleep in Him. 

R. S. HOWIE. 



Betts. — Paul Guilford Betts died in 
Sherman, Texas, September 29, 1908. 

He was the oldest son of the late 
Dr. Henry W. Betts and Mary Eliza- 
beth Heilig, and the grandchild of 
Rev. A. D. Betts, of the North Caro- 
line Conference. His end was per- 
fect peace. His parents must have 
been glad when he passed through 
heaven's gate. He leaves one broth- 
er, Professor C. E. Betts, of Salis- 
bury, to whom our hearts go out in 
tenderest sympathy. 

A. D. BETTS. 



Quarterly ZXCeetings. 



ASHEVILLE DISTRICT— 1st Round. 

D. Atkins, P. E., Asheville, N. C. 

Bethel Nov. 29 

Riverside " 29 

Tryon and Saluda, Tryon Dec. 5-6 

Biltmore and Mt. Pleasant, Bilt- 

more " 12-13 

Haywood Street " 13 

Bald Creek, Laurel ' 19-20 

Weaverville ct., Salem " 26-27 

Weaverville station " 27-28 

Swannanoa, Swannanoa Jan. 2-3 



Burnsville, Burnsvllle " 9-10 

Hendersonv'e ct., Moore's G've, " 16-17 

Henderson ville " 17 

Central " 24 

North Asheville " 24 

Fairview, Tweeds " 30-31 

Marshall, Marshall Feb. 6-7 

Hot Springs, Hot Springs " 13-14 

The district stewards will meet In Cen- 
tral qhurch, Asheville, December 16th, 
at 11 a. m. 



Thermal City, Thermal City .. " 
Ruther/ordton, Rutherfordton, " 

Forest City, Forest City Jan. 

Henrietta and Caroleen, Caro- 

leen " 

Broad River at Klestlers " 

Green River, Lebanon " 

Cliffslde, Hopewell 

Morganton station (at night).. " 
Moiganton circuit, Glen Alpine, "■ 
Hartland ct., Mt. Pleasant ...Feb. 
Table Rock ct., Llnville " 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

11. K. Boyer, P. E., Charlotte, N. C. 
Tryon Street, November 29. 
Brevard Street, November 29-30, 7:30 
p. m. 

Dtlvvorth and Big Spring, December 2, 
7:30 p. m. 

Unionville, Unionville, December 5-6. 

Monroe, Central, December 6, 7:30 p. 
m. 

Polkton, Marshville, December 9, 11 a. 
in. 

Morven, New Hope, December 10, 11 a. 
m. 

Lilesville, Shady Grove, Dec. 11, 11 

a. in. 

Prospect, Bethlehem, December 12-13, 
11 a. in. 

North Monroe and Icemorlee, Decem- 
ber 13, 7:30 p. m. 

North Charlotte, December 14, 7:30 p. 
in. 

Belmont Park, Dec. 16, 7:30 p. m. 
Ansonville, Ansonville, Dec. 19-20, 11 a. 
m. 

Wadesboro, Dec. 20, 7:30 p. m. 
Waxhaw,- Waxhaw, Dec. 22, 11 a. m. 
Weddington, Union, December 23, 11 

a. in. 

Pineville, Pineville, Dec. 26-27, 11 a. m. 
Calvary, Dec. 27-28, 7:30 p. m. 
Mount Zion Station, Dec. 30, 7:30 p. m. 
Derita, Derita, Jan. 2-3, 11 a. m. 
Matthews, Jan. 6, 7:30 p. m. 
Trinity, Jan. 10, 11 a. m. 
Chadwick and Seversville, Jan. 10, 7:30 
p. m. 

District Stewards and Lay Leaders' 
Meeting in Tryon Street church, Tues- 
day, December 8th, 2:30 p. m. 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

W. R. Ware, P. E., Greensboro, N. C. 

Greensboi'O, Carraway Mem'l, Dec. 6 

Greensboro, West Market St... " 13 

Greensboro, Walnut Street ..." 13 

High Point, Washington St . . . " 20 

High Point, S. Main St " 20 

Greensboi'O, Centenary " 27 

Greensboro, Muir's Chapel ... " 27-28 

Liberty, Liberty Jan. 3-4 

Greensboro, Spring Garden St., " 10 

East Greensboro, Holts Chapel, " 10-11 

Pleasant Garden, Rehobeth ... " 16-17 

Coleridge, Concord " 23-24 

Kamseur & F'klinville, R'seur, " 24-25 

Asheboro ct., West Chapel ... " 30-31 

Asheboro station Jan. 31-Feb 1 

Randolph, Trinity " 6-7 

Wentworth, Salem " 13-14 

Reidsville " 14-15 

Uwharrie, Concord " 20-21 

Denton, Denton ' " 22 

Ruffin, Lowe's " 27-28 

Randleman and Naomi Mar. 6-7 



MORGANTON DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

R. M. Hoyle, P. E., Marlon, N. C. 
Rutherford College (at night).. Dec. 4-6 
Connelly Sp'gs, Connelly Sp'gs, " 5-6 

Spruce Pine, Mt. Vernon " 8 

Elk Park, Elk Park " 10 

Bakersville, Bakersville " 12-13 

North Catawba, Capernaum ..." 15 

Marion station (at night) " 18-20 

Old Fort, Old Fort " 19-20 

McDowell, Glenwood " 22 



«... J? 




F. S. Royster 
Guano Co. 
Norfolk, Virginia. 



23 
26-27 
2-3 

9-10 
13-14 
16-17 
23-24 

29- 31 

30- 31 
6-7 

13-14 



SALISBURY DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

J. C. Rowe, P. E., Salisbury, N. C. 

Spencer Dec. 6 

E. Spencer and N. Main, E. 

Spencer 

Holmes Memorial 

Albemarle 

West Albemarle. . • 

Salisbury ct., Bethel 

First Chjjrch 

South Main. 

Woodleaf ct., Woodleaf . . . . . 

Linwood, Cotton Grove .. .. ..Jan. 

Lexington 

Salem 

Big Lick, Big Lick 

Cottonville, Cedar Grove 

Norwood 

Bethel 

Concord ct., Mt. Carmel 

Mt. Pleasant, Mt. Pleasant . . . 

Central 

Kannapolis, Bethpage 

China Grove, China Grove . . . 

Jackson Hill, Center 

New London, New London . . . 

Gold Hill, Gold Hill 

District Stewards will meet December 
16 and 17, at 2 o'clock, p. m., In First 
Methodist Church, in Salisbury. We 
hope to have Prof. W. R. Thompson at 
the meeting and have a leader's meeting 
of Laymen's Movement In connection 
with the district steward's meeting. The 
preachers are invited and It is desired 
that every charge shall be represented. 
First Church will provide entertainment. 
Please notify Capt. W. B. Summersett, 
Salisbury, N. C, of your coming. 



6 

20-21 
21 
26 
27 
27 
30 

2- 3 

3- 4 
6 
7 

9-10 
10-11 
15 

16- 17 
18 

17- 18 
19 

19-20 
23 

24- 25 

25- 26 



FRANKLIN DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

R. M. Taylor, P. E., Franklin, N. C. 

Franklin station Nov. 29 

Macon circuit, Union Dec. 5-6 

B,-\-son City, Bryson City " 12-13 

Gler.ville, Norton's " 19-20 

Dillsboro and Sylva, Dillsboro, " 26-27 

Webster, Webster Jan. 2-3 

Murphy circuit, Tomotla " 9-10 

Andrews station " 10-11 

Franklin circuit, Oak Ridge ... " 16-17 

Robbinsville, Robbinsville " 23-24 

Hayesville, Oak Forest " 30-31 

Hiawassee circuit, Ranger.. ..Feb. 6-7 

Murphy station " 7-8 

Whittier, Whittier " 13-14 



SHELBY DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

C. F. Sherrill, P. E., Shelby, N. C. 
Lin coin ton circuit, High Shoals, Jan. 2-3 

Lincolnton station " 1-9 

Shelby ct., Patterson Springs, " 9-10 

Stanly Creek ", 10-11 

Lowell, Ebenezer " 16-17 

McAdenville " 17-18 

Bessemer City " 23-24 

West End and Franklin Ave., " 23-24 

South Fork, Ebenezer " 30-31 

Lowesville, Hill's Chapel Feb. 6-7 

Mt. Holly • " 7-8 

Polkville, Rehobeth " 13-14 

Belwood, Palm Tree " 20-21 



STATESVILLE DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

J. N. Huggins, P. E., Statesvllle, N. C. 

Stony Point, Marvin Jan. 2-3 

Alexander at Liberty " 3-4 

Caldwell, Hudson " 9-10 

Granite Falls " 10-11 

Lenoir ct., Zion " 16-17 

Lenoir station " 17-18 

Maiden, Lebanon " 23-24 

Rock Springs, Bethel " 24-25 

Catawba " 30-31 

Hickory ct., West Hickory Feb. 6-7 

Hickory station " 7-8 

Newton " 13-14 

WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

W. H. Willis, P. E., Waynesville, N. C. 

Waynesville Nov. 28-29 

Qlyde, Clyde Dec. 5-6 

Mills River, Avery's Creek ... " 12-13 

Canton tation " 16-17 

Spring Creek, Spring Creek ... " 19-20 

Jonathan. Dellwood " 26-27 

Bethel, Bethel Jan. 2-3 

Sulphur Springs, Laurel Hill . . " 9-10 
North Haywood, Fines Creek.. " 16-17 

West Asheville " 23-24 

Leicester* Leicester " 30-31 

Haywood, Mt. Zion Feb. 6-7 

Brevard ct., Greenwood " 13-14 

Brevard station " 14-15 



WINSTON DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

T. F. Marr, P. E., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Farmington, i armington Jan. 2-3 

Advance, Advance " 3-4 

N. Thomasville, Unity " 9-10 

Thomasville " 10-11 

Forsyth " 16-17 

Grace " 17-18 

Summerfield, Lee's Chapel " 23-24 

Stokesdale, Stokesdale " 24-25 

Lewisville, Concord " 30-31 

Davidson, Good Hope Feb. 6-7 

Davie, Hardison " 13-14 

Mocksville " 14-16 

Cooleemee " 14 

The district stewards will meet In the 
pastor's study of Centenary church, 
Winston, N. C, Tuesday, December 29, 
at 11:30 a. m. 



•"•^.•.REGISTERED 



MT. AIRY DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

W. M. Bagby, P. E., Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Rural Hall, Trinity Jan. 2-3 

Pilot Mountain, Ebenezer " 6-7 

Mt. Airy ct., Zion " 9-10 

Mt. Airy station, Mt. Airy ... " 10-11 

Sparta, Sparta " 13-14 

Laurel Springs, Chestnut Hill, " 16-17 

Jefferson. Jefferson " 20-21 

Helton, Methodist Chapel " 23-24 

Creston, Big Laurel " 30-31 

Boone, Fairview Feb. 3-4 

Waiauga, Valle Crucls " 6-7 

WilV»g rt , TTnlori . " 10-11 

FROST PROOF Kf 

GUARANTEED TO SATISFY PURCHASERS 

Price: 1,000 to 5,000 at $1.50 per 1,000; 
5.000 to 9,000 at $1.25 per 1,000; 10,000 
and over at $1.00 per 1,000. Our cata- 
logue gives full instructions for grow- 
ing all kinds of fruits and vegetables, 
and mailed on request. Wm. C. GER- 
ATY CO., The Cabbage Plant Men, P. O. 
Box, 670, Young's Island, S. C. 



January ?, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



15. 



"A twicer:' 

Gladstone's rule, even in his older 
years, was that of a "twicer", as he 
termed it, at public worship. Church- 
going, he said, was not a matter of 
fancy for a Christian; it is his duty 
for the work's sake. No public-spir- 
ited disciple has a moral right to be 
absent except for a good cause, he of- 
ten asserted, from public worship. I 



am a regular church-goer. I should 
go for various reasons if I did not love 
it, but I am fortunate enough to find 
great pleasure in the midst of devout 
multitudes, whether I can accept all 
their creeds or not. For I find that 
there is in the corner of my heart a 
little plant called Reverence, which 
wants to be watered once a week. 
Oliver Wendell Ho'mes. 



WORRY, A SLAVE-MASTER. 
The moment I fret about a thing 
I am its slave, instead of its master. 
And there is no slave-master in the 
world like worry. Another master may 
gi udge the dinner hour, but he must 
give you time for sleep. Another mas- 
ter may grudge the dinner hour, but 
sometime you must eat. But worry 
will work you twenty four hours a day 



and spoil your appetite in the bargain. 
— Mark Guy Pearse. 




Earliest Header. 
Fine, Medium Size. 
Excellent Shipper. 
Delicious forTable. 



About ten days 
later than E. Jersey. 
A full size larger. 
A Money Maker. 



I CABBAGE PLANTS 

i EARLY HEADERS 
f MONEY MAKERS 



Earnest Fiat \ THESE ARE THE KIND THAT MADE SOUTH 

Cibbage A larpe 

yichkrandagood I CAROLINA FAMOUS FOR CABBAGE GROWING 

shipper. r 



They need no introduction. We guarantee FULL COUNT, safe delivery, and satisfaction or your MONEY REFUNDED. Send money with order, 
orhetwise plants will be shipped c o. D. ar.d you will have to pav return charges on the money, thus adding to the cost of your plants. 

Prices f o b. Youngs Island: 500 1 or $1.00; WOO to 4.000 at $1.50 per 1,0.0; 5,000 to 8,000 at $1.25 per 1,000; 9,000 to 20,000 at $1.00 per 1,000. Special 
prices on larger quantities. Prompt attention giyen all orders and ino.uines. ^ ^ GIBSON, BOX 44, Young's Island, S. C. 



BcstI 



1 



Illustrated catalogue mailed free on application. 



Sheet Music 

We will give you three copies of a ■ i TT^. 
the 50omu s ic lifted below. We will 17 H J |~/ I~/ 

also give you one of our new cata- n w£ W M 
lo«s of musio containing the titles II Im.l_~jE a 
of over a thousand pieces. Send us • * mA^Arf 
the names and addresses of fnteen 
musical people and we will promptly mail each, a cata* 
log— and you three pieces of music free. 

Here is your chance to get some new catchy musio — at 
no expense or trouble: 

....Barn Dance (Great Hit) Reg. Price $0.50 

....Star of the West Kcvcru- (Verv fine).. " " .50 
.. ..Soldier's Dream Descriptive &lurch.. " " .50 
....Western Flyer March and Two-Step. " " .50 
....Auto Race March (With much vim).. " " .50 
....Dancing Shadows (Very beautiful).. . " " .50 

....St. PauFWuliziEnsy) " " .60 

....Mocking Bird (Mack) " " .60 

....Sacred Son* Medley (Verv beautiful) ** " .50 

....Old Black Joe i Variations) " •• .50 

....Moon Kisjcs (Three-Step) •* " .60 

....Jesus, Lover of My Soul (Vocal) " " .60 

Our new catalog contains all the old favoiites, all the 
new ones — popular.standard and classic sheet music— full 
size. Best paper, clear, handsome printing, title page in 
two and three colors. Regular 60c music for 10c a copy. 
EDCC Three sheets of popular music. Send the 
■ II Lb names and addresses of fifteen musical 
friends and five 2c stamps for post lug- and mail- 
ing music to you. Mark, an X before name of 
pieces you wish. 

Mckinley music co. 

169 Patten Bldg., Chicago 1 95 6th Ave., Now Vor» 



Gipsy Smith, Campbell Morgan, A.G.Dixon 

Cork, Moorehead, Moule, Stelzle, Trotter, Mullins.Gray, 
Mott, Torrey, Orr, Erdman and Speer are among those 
whose addresses have recently appeared in our 

CHRISTIAN WORKER'S MAGAZINE 



Three 
Mob. 
Trial 

25 Cte 



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perplexing questions answered; world news at a clance ;notes and sn g- 
^estions; usable illustrations and ouUiueB. Nothing like it in the 

country. SPECIAL— From now thro' Dec. 1909 for $1. 
THE INSTITUTE TIE, 80 Institute Place, Chicago, 111. 




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for every 
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what it will do, price, etc. 

COUNTY AGENTS WANTED 

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174 So. Water St., Chicago, III 



DEAF 25 YEARS 

Can Wow Hear Whispers , 

I was deaf for 25 
years. I can now [fj? 
hear a whisper 
with my artifi- 
cial EAR DRUMS 
J in my ears. You Medicated Ear Drum 
Sgi cannot see them pat. July 16, 1808 
x " s in mv ears. I C«n 

Not F««l Them for they are perfectly 
comfortable. Write and 1 will tellyou 
a true story— How I Got Deaf— and How 
I Made Mvself Hear. Address 

CEO. P. WAY 

8 Ad.UIda SI.. Detroit, Mick 





FREE TO 




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We mean what we sav. We will 
bend to vou ABSOLUTELY FREE 
f THIS LOVELY BANGLE PIN with 
the entire, Lord's Prayer engraved 
_ on it i f you will send us 2 cents in 
* stamps to pav for mailing. 
REED MFC. CO., 73 Sun St., PROVIDENCE,!!. I. 




THE WONDERBERRY 

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GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY 14, 1909. 



VOL. LIV.-NO. 2. 



( THE CHRISTIAN'S EXPERIENCE 1 



EMPTATION IS A COMMON 

©experience of man. The Chris- 
tian man is more keenly con- 
scious of its power than the man 
of the world. It often happens 
that in the experience of the 
soul newly yielded to Christ 
this fact causes great perplexity. 

Why is it the young Christian, especially, of- 
ten inquires, that since I yielded my life to 
Christ I have been more tempted than ever? 
The explanation always lies in the very fact 
of that surrender. Directly the human soul 
ranges itself on the side of Christ, it becomes 
peculiarly the object of enmity on the part 
of Satan and his emissaries. The devil is ever 
busy attempting to spoil God's fairest work, 
and to prevent the perfecting of the life re- 
ceived in the mystery of the new birth. 

Another reason arises out of the very na- 
ture of the Christian life. With the hew life 
there has come a new consciousness of evil, 
and a new sensitiveness in its presence. Temp- 
tation which came yesterday, but was hardly 
appreciated, comes again today, and it is felt 
in all its force. It is well to remember this. 
The holier a man is, the more acutely con- 
scious he is of temptation. The stronger a 
man is in all his moral fiber, the more does 
temptation appeal to him. It is not the weak 



man who feels the real force of temptation, 
for he yields resistlessly to it. It is not the 
impure man who suffers under temptation, 
for his moral fibers are no longer sensitive, 
and the suggestion of evil brings ho pain. But 
the man in whom there has begun to move and 
thrill the pure, strong life of the Christ, the 
man whose spirit is dominated by the Holy 
Spirit, he it is who feels the full force and 
pain of temptation. That thing was tempta- 
tion to me yesterday, ere I had met the 
Christ; but there was no pain in it, no strain, 
no tug. only a willing yielding. But when I 
yielded myself to him, a new force came into 
my life, ennobling and purifying, and when 
temptation comes there is now resistance; my 
consciousness of it is keener, not only because 
1he enemy is more earnest in his attack, but 
becaiise my sensibility is greater. Let me say 
to the young child of God who is troubled by 
temptation : Take heart. Be of good cour- 
age. The man held fast in the grip of vice 
knows nothing of the pain of temptation. 
Take heart, and know that your sensitiveness 
to temptation is sure evidence of the new life, 
the new purity and power working dynami- 
cally through your personality. — Rev. G. 
Campbell Morgan, in "The Simpler Things of 
the Christian Life." 



2 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



.tanuary 14. 1909. 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 



Entered according to the Postal Laws and Regula- 
tions in the Post Office in Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year $1.50 

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To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.00 a year. 

Office: 110 East Gaston Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

This paper will be continued to subscribers at 
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unless you intend to pay for the paper, do not allow 
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your paper discontinued, notify us by postal card. 



EDITORIAL. 



THE STATE LIBRARY. 

The State Library at Raleigh is located in an 
ordinary brick building, which could very easily 
be destroyed by fire and is at any time likely to be. 
In the library are deposited a great many histori- 
cal documents, together with the files of the state 
papers reaching back to the 18th century, and 
to the future historian these will be invaluable. 
It is the duty of the state to preserve them and 
thus preserve very important history, and it 
would be next to criminal for those in authority 
to refuse to appropriate a liberal sum for the erec- 
tion of a permanent fire proof building in which 
all these books and papers can be kept and added 
to. ■ 

We hope the legislature will not take the risk 
of refusing to provide better care for the state 
records. No reasonable man could criticise so 
wise an appropriation. 



THE LEGISLATURE. 

The legislature met in Raleigh on Wednesday 
of last week. Whitehead Kluttz, the young Sena- 
tor from Rowan, was elected president pro tem- 
pore of the Senate, and A. J. Maxwell of Craven, 
Chief Clerk, and Mark Squires, of Lenoir, Read- 
ing Clerk. 

A. W. Graham, of Oxford, was elected Speaker 
of the House, with T. G. Cobb, of Morganton, 
Chief Clerk, and R. M. Phillips, of Sanford, Read- 
ing Clerk. * 

It is said to be a conservative body and inclined 
to go slow in all matters which might tend to 
arouse the fears of any business interest. 

Governor-elect Kitchin was inaugurated Tues- 
day, and January 19th Hon. Lee S. Overman will 
be formally re-elected to the U. S. Senate. Mr. 
Overman has made a fine record and well de- 
serves to be returned and the State needs him in 
that important place. 



MAKING HAVOC OF THE MEMBERSHIP. 

The roll of members in any church should be- 
regarded as a very sacred thing, and should be 
handled with as much reverence and care as the 
Ark of the Covenant. We need only inquire as 
to the significance of a name in order to appre- 
ciate this. A name represents a personality. It 
stands for an immortal spirit that must live here 
and hereafter. A soul that 'keeps two worlds at 
strife." No matter how obscure or how unwor- 
thy one may seem, he is still a son of Adam, and, 
as such, one redeemed by the precious blood of 
Christ. What right have we, then, in dealing 
with these names, to be arbitrary or exacting, or 
to deal with them without the sympathetic spirit 
that would go first to seek and recover that which 
is lost? Christ came to seek and to save the sort 
Of people whom we are wont to cast away as 
worthless cumberers of the ground. 

There is a cry almost everywhere for the purg- 
ing of church rolls. They say we are carrying 
dead weight in long lists of names for whom no 
one can account. May be so in some instances, 
but the clause in our Book of Discipline which 
authorizes us to drop those who are "lost sight 
of" is worked for more than it is worth, and too 
often furnishes opportunity for dumping respon- 
sibilities which ought to be met and discharged 
in a more manly and Christlike manner. One is 
not lost sight of simply because he has absented 
himself from the church services for the space of 
one year. Too often such are • but the straggling 
ones, represented in the parable of the lost 
sheep, and the call of God to the true pastor is 
to go and search for the lost sheep till he find 
It 



The greatest crime of the church today is its 
failure to exercise discipline — its failure to deal 
faithfully with every soul in the exercise of -that 
discipline which is calculated to save. If it be 
said of any pastor that he is not capable of exer- 
cising discipline, let it be understood that such 
a pastor has not the spir.it of Christ. 

Instead of arbitrarily cutting off the names of 
wayward members, let the church go after them 
in the spirit of Christ and it will not be long till 
we shall begin to see the blessed fruits not only 
in the restoration of the erring, but in the spir- 
itual quickening of the whole church. 

"Brethren, if any -of you do err from the truth, 
and one convert him; let him know that he which 
converteth the sinner from the error of his way 
shall save a soul from death and shall hide a mul- 
titude of sins." — St. James. 

We beg those who are zealous for revising and 
purging our rolls to be careful lest they make 
havoc of those over whom God has appointed 
them as overseers. Let us hold every name till 
we find a satisfactory reason for removing same. 



THE PROCESSION STILL MOVING. 

We refer to the procession seen every Sunday 
morning going away from the church just before 
the hour for the preaching service. We have tak- 
en occasion several times since we have tried to 
serve the church in the capacity of editor, to 
sound the alarm, but, from observation, we fear 
our warnings have not been effectual. Several 
times recently we have had occasion to meet the 
throngs that were going away from the Sunday 
school just before the hour for preaching, and 
we are free to confess that the sight has been 
depressing. While trying to be thankful for the 
Sunday school and the thousands of children gath- 
ered every Sabbath day for instruction in God's 
word, we have been led to wonder what can be 
the real value of a Sunday school that educates 
the children away from the sanctuary at the hour 
oi. worship, or at least fails to turn their feet to- 
ward the place where the gospel is preached. 

It has been more than fifteen years since Bish- 
op Keener, then our senior bishop, sounded the 
alarm on this subject in a very thoughtful article 
published in the church papers. In that article 
he warned the church of the folly of a system of 
Sunday school training which fails to make of the 
children devout worshippers. Since that time we 
have watched this procession with more interest 
than ever before, and there is one feature which 
makes the situation more disquieting perhaps 
than any other, and that is that today there is a 
much larger proportion of grown young men and 
women in the procession than ever before. Not 
only are the children of today seen going away 
from the church at the hour of service, but the 
children who formed this procession fifteen years 
ago, are still, many of them, going away, and 
failing to hear the gospel as preached by the ac- 
credited ambassador of Christ. They are con- 
tinuing in the way they started in childhood, and 
it is to be feared that many of them are not only 
indifferent toward the gospel service, but that 
they even feel a sort of contempt for the preacher 
himself. • 

This may seem to some a rather cheerless, if 
not absolutely gloomy view of the situation, but 
we submit that there is reason for alarm, and all 
Sunday school superintendents and teachers 
should give very prayerful consideration to the 
question as to what real value we may attach to 
a Sunday school which does not promote attend- 
ance on the preaching service. If it is true that 
the children can not be held for the preaching ser- 
vice (which we do not believe), then let the 
preacher have at least fifteen minutes of the time 
of the Sunday school in which to deliver the mes- 
sage of salvation to them, and let it not be said 
to our shame that we are responsible for a sys- 
tem of so-called religious training which makes it 
even more difficult for the pastor to get hold of 
the children and young people. On any Sunday 
morning it requires but little stretch of the imag- 
ination to behold millions of children in one 
grand procession going away from the house of 
God, when, by every token, they should be going 
in the opposite direction. Can we not devise 
some plan by which to remedy the evil? 



NOTICE. 

The Conference Minutes are being shipped to 
the preachers this week charges prepaid, and 
we hope by Saturday to have them all in the ex- 
press office. Special care has been taken to make 
this issue of the Minutes correct, but after all, 



errors will appear. By an oversight the name of 
Joseph E. Womack, who was received on trial, 
does not appear in place on pages 10 and 27. The 
name of O. J. Jones appears twice in Appoint- 
ments, first as a professor in Rutherford College, 
and after that form was printed he was appointed 
to New London charge. The names of W. B. 
Sanford and O. P. Routh do not appear under 
Minute Question 6, as they were transferred from 
the North Carolina Conference after our adjourn- 
ment. 

W. L. SHERRILL, Secretary. 



TO OUR SUBSCRIBER!*. 
We call attention again to the new ruling of the 
Postoffice Department, which does not allow us to 
mail at second class rates to subscribers who are 
a year or more behind. A great many fall In this 
class in January and we are sending them notices. 
They will have to be cut off unless they respond 
with the money to pay at least what Is be- 
hind. It is remarkable with what Indifference 
some of these treat bur notices, but we greatly ap- 
preciate the kind responses of many who seem to 
realize the inconvenience to which we are sub- 
jected by such long waiting. One can realize the 
more what this means when we remind the reader 
that it costs us considerably more than $1.00 to 
get the paper to each subscriber for a year. Please 
dear reader, do not Ignore the notices we send 
you, nor blame us for cutting you off If you do not 
respond. We have done our best to accommodate 
all. 



NOTES AND PERSONALS. 



— Rev v J. W. Long, of Epworth, Concord, has 
been visiting relatives in Yadkin county. 

. — Rev. J. W. Jones, of Mooresville, passed 
through the city Monday en route to Beaufort, 
where he will spend some days. 

— Rev. A. W. Plyler is located temporarily in 
Muskogee, Okla., where he is visiting friends. He 
will go to Chicago early in the spring. 

— Rev. S. B. Turrentine, D. D., pastor of First 
Church, Salisbury, will deliver an address before 
the student body of Rutherford College, on |the 
19 th inst. 

— Rev. W. V. Honeycutt, preacher in charge, 
writes that the year is starting off well on the 
Lowell circuit. Everything is promising for a 
good year. 

— Rev. John F. Kirk and Mrs. Kirk are spend- 
ing the week at Summerfield where Brother Kirk 
is assisting the pastor, Rev. C. P. Good, in a re- 
vival meeting. 

— We are glad to learn that Mrs. A. G. Click, of 
Elkin, who underwent a surgical operation at the 
Statesville Sanitorium some time ago, has so far 
recovered as to be able to return to her home at 
Elkin. 

— Rev. A. R. Canipe and wife passed through 
the city on last Thursday night on their way to 
Aurora, to which charge Brother Canipe was ap- 
pointed at the recent session of the North Carolina 
Conference. 

— Rev. E. Myers, of the Alexander circuit, is 
abundant in labors. The cold snap of last week 
found him engaged in a protracted meeting at 
Beulah church, some eight or nine miles out from 
Taylorsville. 

— Rev. J. F. Totten, who was transferred from 
the Western North Carolina to the Pacific Con- 
ference, arrived last week and has entered upon 
his duties as pastor at Milleville. — Pacific Metho- 
dist Advocate. 

— Mr. M. W. White, of Mooresville, and Mr. V. 
E. Swaim, of Mocksville, both active Methodist 
laymen, were here Monday going to Raleigh to 
attend the Grand Lodge of Masons, which meets 
there this week. 

—There was a meeting of the Board of Trus- 
tees of Rutherford College held at the College on 
Thursday of last week. Some very important 
matters were considered, but at this writing , we 
have no particulars. 

— Davenport College opened this morning for 
the spring term with bright prospects. This ex- 
cellent institution has accomplished much for the 
elevation and refinement of the young women of 
our town and country. — Lenoir Topic. 

— At the meeting of the trustees of Rutherford 
College held last week it was wisely decided not 
to brick veneer the old college builriing, but to 



January 14, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



8 



put a new roof on it and continue to use it till 
a substantial building can later be erected. 

— Rev. H. C. Sprinkle, of Central Church, Albe- 
marle, returned from Nashville, Tenn., last week, 
where he had spent two weeks attending the 
meeting of missionary leaders. He reports 
a very profitable as well as enjoyable trip. 

— We have learned with deep regret of the 
death of Mrs. Georgia Dinkins, which occurred at 
her home in Asheville, recently. The editor was 
her pastor some years ago, and remembers her 
as a sweet-spirited and consecrated woman. 

— Rev. N. R. Richardson and his plucky little 
congregation at Spring Garden Street are push- 
ing work on their beautiful new church, and hope 
soon to occupy the auditorium. The work has 
been somewhat delayed on account of the delay 
in the glazing of the windows. 

— Rev. V. L. Marsh writes that the date of the . 
first quarterly meeting for the Thermal City 
charge has, by authority of Rev. R. M. Hoyle, the 
presiding elder, been changed from December 
23rd, 1908, to January 26th, 1909. The meeting 
will be held at Thermal City. 

— The Statesville people make very encourag- 
ing reports of the beginning of the work at Broad 
Street under the pastorate of Rev. Harold 
Turner. The congregation is still worshipping in 
the court house, but hopes to get in the new 
church some time during the year. 

— Mrs. Martha McCorkle, widow of the late 
Judge M. L. McCorkle, died at her home in New- 
ton on last Sunday morning after a brief illness 
at a ripe old age. She had been a member of the 
German Reformed Church from her youth, and 
was a woman of exceptional gifts and graces. 

— We are greatly pleased to note the fine suc- 
cess of Rev. J. P. Rodgers, Field Agent of the 
Children's Home. Last week at Leaksville and 
Spray he secured $1,000 for the home. The 
building committee held a meeting last week and 
it is expected that the home will be in course of 
construction soon. 

— The congregation of Main Street Methodist 
Church will erect a modern parsonage this year. 
The present building, which was erected early in 
the last century, though still in good repair, will 
be moved back and joined to the new building. 
H. R. Scott, Esq., contributes $150 towards, the 
work. — Webster's . Weekly. 

—Miss Alice Nicholson, a devout member of 
our church, died at the residence of her sister-in- 
law, Mrs. Mary Nicholson, at Guilford College, 
last Saturday morning. She had been ill for sev- 
eral weeks. The funeral was conducted by Revs. 
J. A. Bowles and Albert Peele, and the body was 
laid to rest in Greene Hill cemetery. 

—Rev. T. R. Wolfe, the new pastor of Salem 
and Southside churches, is making a fine impres- 
sion on his two congregations. He is a forceful 
and interesting speaker, and a popular pastor. 
At each service conducted by him at these two 
churches he has been greeted by large congrega- 
tions which have not failed to manifest their ap- 
preciation of the splendid sermons delivered by 
him. — Winston Sentinel. 

— Rev. W. L. Hutchins, pastor of Forest Hill 
Methodist church, and Rev. W. C. Jones, pastor 
of the West Concord charge, entertained their 
stewards to supper at the Forest Hill parsonage 
las Tuesday evening. Revs. P. T. Durham, J. W. 
Long, Walter Thompson and Dr. W. C. Houston 
were also present. There were several talks on 
matters pertaining to the church, and some de- 
lightful music. — Concord Times. 

— As schools are making up their faculties for 
next year, or soon will be, now is the time for a 
teacher who wants a place to register with the 
Teacher's Bureau of the M. E. Church, South. 
This bureau is conducted by the General Board of 
Education of our church, and its service never 
costs a cent beyond the registration fee of $2.00. 
For particulars address our secretary of Educa- 
tion, the Rev. J. D. Hammond, Nashville, Tenn., 
Care Methodist Publishing House. 

— By an oversight which we very much regret, 
we failed to mention the death of Mrs. Nancy 
Craven, mother of the late Rev. Jeremiah F. Craven, 
which occurred at the home of her son, . Mr. K. 
L. Craven, of Concord. Sister Craven was a real 
mother in Israel, having lived to the ripe old age 
of 96. She not only lived long, but she lived well. 
The best evidence of her noble and useful life is 
the largenumber of descendants who are living 
lives of great usefulness in their day and genera- 
tion. 



— The Stonewall Jackson Training School, at 
Concord, is ready to begin work. The formal 
opening was held last Monday with a "Shower of 
Household Furnishings," and we trust the shower 
was a generous one. This is the state reform 
school of which Prof. Walter Thompson is super- 
intendent. We have no doubt this is the begin- 
ning yf a great work in the reformation of youth- 
ful criminals in our state. The institution should 
have the sympathy and co-operation of every good 
citizen. 

— The Winston Sentinel, of December 30th, 
says: "A beautiful quiet home wedding was cele- 
brated yesterday at the home of the b-ide's 
brother, Mr. C. E. Johnson at 1:30 o'clock when 
Miss Maria Johnson plighted her troth to Mr. Al- 
bert W. Ellis, of Farmington. The impressive 
ceremony was performed by Rev. James E. Hall, 
of Clemmons, a brother-in-law of the bride, in 
the presence of the immediate relatives. The Ad- 
vocate extends hearty congratulations and wishes 
for Brother Ellis and bride a life of great joy 
and usefulness. 

— Rev. and Mrs. Loy D. Thompson, of Kennedy, 
Texas, are spending the holidays with the form- 
er's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Thompson, at 
Stanly. Mrs. Thompson came several weeks ago 
and Mr. Thompson came about ten days ago. They 
expect to leave for their western home tomorrow. 
Mr. Thompson went west two years ago on ac- 
count of his health, and is pastor of the Metho- 
dist church at Kennedy, Texas. It will be a mat- 
ter of interest to his many friends to know that 
the change in climate has been very beneficial to 
him. — Gastonia Gazette. 

— We are printing this week a tribute to Rev. 
Jesse S. Nelson, written by Miss Mamie Bays, 
and printed in the Charlotte Observer. This now 
ascended brother occupied a large place for many 
years in much of the patronizing territory of the 
Advocate. Many will recall the brave and manly 
defense of the truth as well as the heroic fight 
against sin made by Brother Nelson in the days 
of his strength. Brother Nelson occupied a large 
place in the heart of the senior editor of the Ad- 
vocate, who found him very helpful in the first 
year of his ministry. May the Lord greatly com- 
fort the bereaved ones left behind, who were so 
tenderly loved by this heroic spirit. 

— Last week when the officials* of the First 
Methodist church held their annual meeting, the 
salary of the pastor, Rev. A. L. Stanford, was in- 
creased from $1,100 to $1,400. The year has been 
the most prosperous the church has ever experi- 
enced. The congregation has made large gains 
and is in the best condition in every way that 
it has ever been. The Sunday school, under Mr. 
Stanford's pastorate, has increased in member- 
ship from 75, one year ago, to 400 now; and the 
church roll has been increasd from 250 to 375 — 
gains that the congregation and pastor may well 
feel proud of. The collections for all purposes 
have been in proportion. — Davidson Dispatch. 

— Capt. J. W. Terrell, of Webster, an old veter- 
an of Methodism, died at the home of his son-in- 
law, Mr. Charlie Bird, on December 26th. He 
was a brother of Rev. P. L. Terrell, of our con- 
ference, and untie of Rev. J. M. Terrell, of the 
Brazil Mission. The Waynesville Courier, refer- 
ing to his death, says: "He had lived to a ripe 
old age, respected by all who knew him. His 
death is greatly regretted by all who knew him. 
The burial took place at the Shoal Creek ceme- 
tery Sunday afternoon in the presence of a large 
concourse of sorrowing friends. For many years 
he was a resident of Webster, the county seat of 
Jackson. He represented Jackson county one 
term in the legislature. He was a man highly 
respected by all who knew him, and probably did 
not have an enemy in the world." 

—Rev. H. K. Boyer, of Charlotte, and Rev. J. 
W. Jones, of Mooresville, passed through States- 
ville yesterday en route to Connelly Springs to 
attend a meeting of the board of trustees of Ruth- 
erford College, of which board Mr. Jones is chair- 
man and Mr. Boyer a member. The meeting was 
held to confirm the nomination of a new member 
of the faculty of the college, discuss the matter of 
an additional building for the college and attend 
to routine business. Prof. O. J. Jones, who had 
been a member of the faculty of Rutherford Col- 
lege for some time, has been appointed pastor of 
a Methodist church at New London. Professor 
Anderson Weaver, a member of the faculty of 
Davenport College, Lenoir, had been nominated 
as Professor Jones' successor, and at the meeting 
of the trustees yesterday his nomination was con- 
firmed. — Statesville Landmark. 

— A very enjoyable reception was given by the 



Stewards and Woman's Missionary societies of 
West Market Street church, on last Thursday 
evening in honor of Rev. and Mrs. W. R. Ware, 
and Rev. and Mrs. E. K. McLarty, the presiding 
elder, and pastor, respectively. Invitations had 
been issued to all the members of the church. 
There were about 500 people present, despite the 
very cold and inclement weather. The church or- 
chestra discoursed beautiful musical selections, 
and dainty refreshments were served. The re- 
porter for the daily press says: "Notwithstand- 
ing that this was a church reception, no social 
function ever held in the city was more delight- 
fully carried out in all the appointments nor more 
greatly enjoyed. From the intense cold without 
the warmth and beauty which greeted everyone 
as they entered the reception rooms at the 
church was most grateful." 

— At the Laymen's Movement meeting held in 
the pastor's study of Centenary M. E. Church, 
South, a resolution was unanimously adopted by 
which those present pledged themselves to exer- 
cise their best efforts to make the salary of every 
Methodist preacher in the Winston district not 
less than $700. The indications are that with 
the co-operation of the Laymen's Movement, Pre- 
siding Elder Marr will carry with him to the next 
Annual Conference the best report ever made to 
that assembly. Dr. Marr is planning for splendid 
results, spiritually and financially, in the Winston 
district this year. Chairman F. S. Lambeth, of 
the Laymen's Movement, is appointing laymen 
to visit several charges in the district and ac- 
quait the membership of each what the Laymen's 
Movement means and to urge a more- hearty oc- 
operation with their respective pastors. He will 
appoint a committee within the next week or two 
to act with Presiding Elder .Marr in selecting 
places, dates and programs for about five mission- 
ary institutes to be held in the district early in 
the new year. Though the places have not been 
named yet, an institute will probably be held at 
Leaksville, one at Walnut Cove, one at Advance, 
one at Thomasville and one at Kernersville. — 
Winston Sentinel. 



A CAROLEEN NOTE. 

The first quarterly conference for this charge 
has just been held by Brother Hoyle, according 
to Hoyle and to Methodism in earnest, preaching, 
sacrament, lovefeast, business in detail and in 
the spirit of power and sound minds. While we 
have the Rev. R. M. Hoyle type of the presiding 
eldership, I say and pray, let the office remain as 
it is until the last shingle falls from the temple 
of our Methodism. 

S. M. DAVIS. 



OUR PREMIUM LIST. 

To stimulate our campaign for new subscribers 
and renewals, we offer the following: 

To each preacher securing the number of new 
subscribers allotted to him, in addition to placing 
his name on our roll of honor we will give a copy 
of either of the following books, as he may choose: 

"Growth in Holiness," by James Mudge. 

"The Son of Man," by Gross Alexander. 

"Christ's Table Talk," by Bishop Hendrlx. 

"The Kingdom in the Cradle," by Bishop Atkins. 

"Personal Salvation," by Wilbur F. Tillett. 

"Christian Nurture," by Horace Bushnell. 

"History of Methodism in North Carolina," by 
Rev. W. L. Grissom. 

"Strategic Points of the World's Conquest," by 
John R. Mott. 

"The Evangelization of the World in this Genera- 
tion,'" by John R. Mott. 

"The Students of North America United," by 
John R. Mott. 

"The Pastor and Modern Missions," by John R. 
Mott. 

"The future Leadership of the Church," by John 
R. Mott. 

To the one who sends in the largest number of 
new subscribers we will give the whole set of 
Mott's books as a special premium, provided the 
number shall not be less than thirty. 

To the one sending in the largest amount of 
money, both on new subscribers and renewals, we 
will give a copy of each of the twelve books in 
the above list, provided the amount is not less than 
$75.00. This will be a library in itself. 

All the subscriptions must be paid for in ad- 
vance, and no amount charged on a preacher's ac- 
count shall count in awarding the prizes. Nor 
will any new subscribers taken by our traveling 
representative be counted on the contest. 

The contest will be closed and the prizet awarded 
April the 1st. 



4. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 14, 1909. 



Contributions. 



THE GOSPEL AND THE CHILD. 



Hugh H. Harris, Evanston, 111. 



The question of how the gospel may be most 
effectively presented to the child is forcing itself 
with increasing emphasis upon the Christian 
Church. The cause is not far to seek, for we are 
learning how dependent are both church and state 
upon right training in childhood. The success or 
failure of the gospel of tomorrow lies with the 
children of today. It is a hopeful sign that we 
Christians are asking, "What shall we do to save 
the child?" 

One may best gain a clear conception of our 
problem by letting his mind run back over his 
own childhood. How did the gospel press itself 
home to your heart? What forces were at work 
determining your . character and making you the 
Christian that you have since become? Purposely 
exclude unusual cases, such as those found in 
our slums or among heathen people. Consider 
yourself, for the moment, as typical of a great 
mass of Christians who throng our churches, and 
then answer these questions. Very likely you 
came from a Christian home or at least either fa- 
ther or mother was a Christian. No doubt you 
early began to imitate the religious life of your el- 
ders as you did their gestures, their speech, their 
very tones. Without asking why, you prayed, 
you sang, you joined in family devotions, you at- 
tended church. If they were reverential in atti- 
tude, you were reverential too. If they were kind- 
ly disposed toward their fellows, so were you. 
And unless unfortunate and ill-considered pres- 
sure was brought to bear, you did these religious 
acts joyously. To be sure you did not always in- 
terpret these acts as did your parents. A little 
child who first became conscious of grace at ta- 
ble began to repeat, "One, two, three, four, five, 
six, seven, eight," as rapidly as possible. But 
such imitation, far afield as it seemed to be, was 
for that child fundamental to a more intelligent 
religious faith. 

* * * # • 

Now out of our repeated imitations grow habits. 
And out of religious imitation grows religious hab- 
it. Before the age of reflection was reached you 
had already habituated yourself to certain relig- 
ious acts. You prayed at night as habitually as 
you undressed for bed. You bowed your head 
' at prayer time as habitually as you smiled at your 
mother. You did not say, "Now I need commu- 
nion with the Unseen," or "There is a lack of 
adjustment between my attainments and my 
ideals and therefore I will pray." You did not 
even feel any such subtle force. You had prayed, 
you were accustomed to pray, you did pray. 

But presently reflection awoke. Adult life was 
hastening its approach. No longer satisfied with 
the ready-to-hand answers, you demanded fuller 
explanations. You were dissatisfied with habitual 
religion. Emancipation from custom, religious as 
well as secular, clamored for recognition. You 
determined to be your own very self. Religious 
reflections asserted themselves and doubts must 
be settled. Did there come to your life a seismic 
shock, an eruption that created for you a new 
heaven and a new earth? It may be; or perhaps 
religious selfhood arose more gradually above the 
dead level of the sea of habitual religion into the 
joyous light of full manhood's day. 

Now it seems beyond peradventure that the gos- 
pel will most effectively present itself to the 
child's mind when it labors along these most nat- 
ural lines. First of all clothing itself in Christian 
fatherhood and motherhood, it will address itself 
to the child's imitative instincts. Day by day it 
will walk before the child in Christian manhood 
and womanhood. The gospel will impress itself 
upon the child's plastic mind as day after day, 
"like father and mother" he prays and sings and 
does the numberless things that constitute the 
round of religious duties. And so before many 
summers have passed over his childish head, hab- 
it, that dread yet beneficent master of our des- 
tinies, will begin to assert itself and the gospel 
will have gained its first victory in the battle for 
the child's soul. 

You smile. You think that the religious habits 
of childhood are ephemeral things. Too long have 
we spoken lightly of child religion; too feebly 
have we emphasized the fundamental importance 
of religious habits in childhood; too constantly 
have we left the child to contract bad habits, al- 



lowed him to alienate himself from things relig- 
ious, and then attempted to reform him (and in- 
cidentally to excuse our own negligence) by 
means of one grand outburst of revival convulsion 
The child who faces the problems of life and of 
religion with irreligious habits is looking for the 
sunrise with face to the west. No matter how 
striking such experiences as St. Paul's, the. resul- 
tant characters root themselves in such childhood 
habits as his. Jerry McAuley is reported as say- 
ing that he despaired of a man who could not look 
back upon a godly mother. And long after later 
years have eradicated many things from our 
minds, the religious habits of our childhood are 
blessed memories, oases in the desert of later ir- 
religious years. 

Again the gospel presses itself home through 
the organized church. In his early childhood days, 
its services lend unconscious influence in acquir- 
ing religious habits. Its school upon the Sabbath 
day places before his mind, couched in mental 
images of his own, certain ideals. Moreover the 
church aims to cultivate habit by means of oppor- 
tunities for Christian service. The pulpit and the 
school, if faithful to their trust, labor to help him 
in later childhood to interpret his longings, and 
desires, his conflicts and victories, and even his 
defeats. Finally by holding up that matchless 
character, by making goodness personal and jus- 
tice lovable in that Personality, by insisting upon 
the fruits of the Spirit as alone sufficient evidence 
of a truly filial relation to the divine Father, the 
gospel presses itself home through the Christian 
Church. 



THE GOSPEL AND YOUNG PEOPLE. 



Alonzo C. Fry, Cincinnati. 



"I can easier teach twenty what were good to 
be done," declared Shakespeare, "than to be one 
of the twenty to follow 'mine own teaching." It 
is easier to seem than to be; it is less difficult to 
speak than to practice; the counterfeit costs less 
than the genuine. But young people are keen. 
They quickly detect that which is insincere, un- 
real, or inconsistent. They see so much of this 
in everyday life that they do not respond when 
urged to accept Jesus Christ unless the appeal is 
supported by sincerity in action and by a daily 
life marked by purity and genuine devotion to 
God. If, therefore, the gospel is to be presented 
effectively to young people they must see Christ 
in his fullness in absolute control of your life and 
mine. We must be a living example of the worth 
of the gospel in human experience and have so 
utilized it that we can testify to its power to sat- 
isfy all the legitimate demands of young life. 

* * * * 

Moreover, in presented the gospel to young peo- 
ple we must deal frankly and plainly with them. 
If there is anything characteristic of young peo- 
ple, it is openheartedness. He holds the reigns 
to their affections and life who is big enough, and 
true enough and good enough to deal frankly 
with them. Let us free ourselves from all cant, 
hypocrisy, compromise, patronijing attitude, or 
any form of weakness. If your heart is hid with 
Christ in God and filled with his fullness there is 
nothing to fear. Call wrong by its right name, re- 
buke sin, commend right. Let it be clearly under- 
stood that when a young person surrenders to 
Jesus Christ he must face about, cut free from 
all evil, all unrighteous associations, and become 
an aggressive, consecrated follower, following 
wheresoever he may lead, doing whatsoever he 
may require, and being just what he through His 
word and the Holy Spirit calls him to be. Make 
it plain that this may lead near the path which 
Jesus and his early disciples trod. We have over- 
emphasized the thought that it is a very simple 
and easy thing to come into the Christian life. 
This has not contributed to the development of a 
peculiar people, and it has failed in most cases 
to produce a vital Christian experience or a thor- 
ough change of heart. Young people do not shun 
that which requires courage and strength of char- 
acter. Jesus did not say to the young man sim- 
ply believe and follow me. He showed that it 
was necessary for him to vitalize his belief, and 
that a great purpose must support him in his 
efforts to follow Christ. So Jesus said unto him: 
"Sell what thou hast and give to the poor, then 
come and follow me." This is the best way, but it 
may be a longer way. It is the way to make 
thorough and devoted disciples of Jesus Christ. 

* * * * 

Too often we place our standard too low. Thor- 



ough work cannot be done on this basis. The 
average normal young person has ideals which 
are in advance of ours, and our presentation of 
the gospel makes no appeal because we have so 
imperfectly presented it. We live so far away 
from God and feed so little upon his Word that 
we present man's distorted understanding of the 
gospel rather than God's revelation of it. We 
have made such a weak surrender that we cannot 
aid young people to make a complete surrender; 
we have gone such a short distance into the King- 
dom, that we can take them only a little way; and 
we are doing so few of the things that the sin- 
cere and consecrated disciple of the Lord ought 
to do that we do not help them to grasp the great 
principles of the religion of Jesus Christ. O, it 
is the supreme charm of his life, the influence 
of his. matchless personality, the absolute victory 
over sin he won as he lived among men, and the 
infinite wealth of his love that draws young people 
to him. If we have not seen these, if we have not 
been helped by them in our own life, we have not 
come to know him, and we have not found the 
best way of presenting his gospel to young peo- 
ple. To know him. as he is, is to passionately love 
and faithfully serve him. To know His word 
means a full heart and an over owing life. It 
brings us under the spell of the Christ and makes 
us his forever. This enables us to make an ap- 
peal which comes red-hot with divine love. 
* * * * 

It is not method about which we ought to be 
concerned, but a condition of heart, of Christian 
experience, and of life gratitude. If our heart is 
pure, our life clean, and absolutely surrendered 
to God, if we are perfectly honest with the young 
people with whom we deal, if we are desperately 
in earnest in our presentation of the gospel to 
them, if we place our life alongside of theirs to 
shield, to encourage, guide, and help them, if our 
testimony is genuine and our action sincere, if 
our appeal is definite and clear, if our love is like 
unto the love of the Son of God, and if we have 
learned his own way of presenting the gospel we 
are in the path that leads to the hearts of young 
people and we have discovered the best way of 
presenting the gospel to them. — Northwestern 
Christian Advocate. 



HOW TO WIN MEN. 



Charles E. Chapler, Eagle Grove, la. 



One of the most difficult problems confronting 
the church today is that of interesting men more 
vitally in the work of the church, getting them 
to accept Christ, and to throw some of their ener- 
gy, their business ability, and their power of or- 
ganization into the work of the church. The 
church is sadly in need of such men. We want 
men who will be as successful in winning souls 
for Christ as our captains of finance are in gath- 
ering in harvests of dollars; men who will or- 
ganize the church into an effective force to at- 
tack successfully the forts of sin and capture 
them for the "Man of Galilee." If we could get 
men who will put their business ability into the 
church, so that the ministers who fill our pul- 
pits shall be paid for services rendered, then the 
cry of the church for men to fill her pulpits will 
be stilled, and the busy marts of this world will- 
ing to pay for services rendered, will not be con- 
tinually taking our men from us. I never look 
at a mighty river running through the land, but 
I think of the power going into ineffective chan- 
nels that might be used for heating, lighting, and 
power — if properly directed. How many times I 
have looked at one managing a successful busi- 
ness, to whom God has given great ability to lead 
men that I do not wish some of his talents might 
be given to God! The question is, Can these men 
be reached? Can many men outside the church 
today be brought to Christ? I think they can, 
and shall endeavor to tell how. 

* * » * 

I lay all the blame at the door of the ministry. 
I believe the minister is the man who is at fault. 
And his fault is that he does not interest himself 
enough in men. I believe that men can be won 
for the Master if the ministry will go among these 
men, be a man among them, become, interested 
in their business, their problems, their successes. 
The average" minister going to a new charge 
makes his first round of calls in the homes and, 
in nine cases out of ten, finds the man of the 
house absent at his place of work*; he calls on 
the woman, prays with her, and thinks his duty 
done. 



January 14, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



6. 



Now, what the minister must do is to seek out 
the men in their places of business — the shop, the 
store, the office — and get acquainted with them. 
Often of course they will be busy but, with a word 
of greeting and a hearty handshake the minister 
may pass on. In the course of a few months he 
will have a good visit with each one; and in a 
short time many of them will look for the call 
and plan for a little visit with tne minister when 
he comes. Many have said to me, "You are the 
first minister who ever called at place of business 
for anything except a donation or some other busi- 
ness." A minister ought to do this systematical- 
ly. He should go from store to store, from of- 
fice to office, from shop to shop, calling on all the 
men whether they be members of his church or 
not, or members of any church. *My first presid- 
ing elder, now G. W. L. Brown, district superin- 
tendent of Des Moin es District, asked me to 
pledge myself to do this work, and I have main- 
tained the practice all these years, giving every 
Monday to it. Where I am now it takes two Mon- 
days; in a larger place it would take more; in a 
city, perhaps, one would have to confine himself 
to the men of his own congregation. But of all 
my work in these eighteen years nothing else has 
brought more blessed results for the Master than 
has this. 

A Question of Method. 

Never bring up the subject of religion. Soon- 
er or later they themselves will bring it up; then, 
like the "Hoosier Schoolmaster," put in your 
"best licks." If they do not belong to any church 
always invite them to come to yours. The work 
is not easy. Monday is the hardest day I have. 
But note some advantages: (1) You become per- 
sonally acquainted with all the men in the town — 
a wonderful advantage. A revival meeting comes 
on; you have tremendous leverage; you know the 
men; you can go to them and call them by name. 
You need not ask if they are Christians; you al- 
ready know. In a recent revival a minister went 
up to a retired Baptist preacher who had lived 
in the town for years and asked him if he were 
a Christian. How many times ministers are criti- 
cised, and justly, because they never speak to men 
concerning religion except at a revival period. You, 
go to these men as a personal friend and ask them 
to accept Christ, and they look upon you as a 
friend. When they accept Christ and want to 
join some church, most of them will come to you, 
for they would feel at home nowhere else. 

Note this difference: A minister calls on the 
women as ministers usually do. The man of the 
house comes home all tired out with his work and 
his wife meets him at the door with a smile, as 
she should, and says, "Have you met our new 
minister?" He answers "No.f She says, "He 
called on me today, and he is such a fine man." 
The man is indifferent; he says nothing, but that 
minister has lost an advantage it will be hard to 
recover. On the other hand when the husband 
comes home he says to his wife, "Have you met 
the new minister?" She says "No." He answers, 
' "I have. He called on me today. He is a fine 
man." The wife is glad, and in a Sunday or two 
it is not surprising if the man says to his wife, 
"I guess I will go to church with you today." I 
think this work is vital. Professional clothes and 
mannerisms should be left at home. A minister 
may learn many helpful lessons from the 
"Knights of the Grip," whom he will meet at al- 
most every round. In time it will be second na- 
ture, this being "a friend to man." 

It is a great advantage to stand at the church 
door at the close of the service and speak to all 
men by name. It is a great humiliation if a man 
comes once and you say, "The name, please?" to 
have him say, "I have been in business here ever 
since you came here." This is the method I have 
tried and found effective in dealing with what we 
call the "men problem." — Northwestern Christian 
Advocate. 



THE MUSIC IN THE REVIVAL. 



Rev. Charles A. Gage, Chicago. 



A good choir is one of the coveted adjuncts of 
the preacher in the revival. It is essential that 
those of the congregation who sing should be 
ready to make any sacrifice demanded of them 
to render the gospel song service the chief at- 
traction of the revival. The choir should be or- 
ganized with that end in view. The spirit of the 
individual singers will have much to do with the 
effect upon the unconverted; there should be no 
professionalism in singing gospel songs. The 



choir is expected to lead the audience in its de- 
votion through the ministry of the song, and ex- 
press for them the appeal of the heart to God. 
It can be made one of the potent factors for the 
successful revival. It may even be organized into 
a band of personal workers who, at least and al- 
ways, may have a part in the sermon itself by 
secretly praying for the preacher and the success 
of his message. 

* * * * 

The leader must be everything to the evangel- 
ist, his equipment in the line of instruments and 
helpers must be thoroughly under his command 
and subservient to his will. Let him use all the 
instruments possible, so long as he uses them. 
Instances are known where instruments were ab- 
solutely a hindrance because the leader did not 
know how to get out of them the support they 
were intended to give. If the revival is to get 
real benefit out of the music the leader ought to 
be a man as consecrated to his work as is the 
evangelist. Singing is not gospel singing unless 
it rises from the heart. 

The song service immediately preceding the de- 
livery of the sermon should be conducted with as 
definite an aim as the sermon; and it must be as 
carefully thought out. It must never be forgot- 
ten that a song will outlive all sermons in the 
memory. Elihu Burrit says: "Among the instru- 
mentalities of love and peace, surely there can 
be no sweeter, softer, more effective voice than 
that of gentle peace-breathing music." The best 
expression some folks have of their overflowing 
souls is in song. An appeal to the emotions in 
a simple song did for the great John B. Gough 
what he says could never have been done through 
any other agency. It is often tne case that a man 
will come to a revival to hear the singing when 
he would not think of coming to hear the preach- 
ing. He will go astray convicted of sin because 
the song left an indelible impression, and the 
preacher had a chance to talk to a man with a 
need. It has been said that the lines of poetry 
the periods of prose, and even the texts of Scrip- 
ture most frequently recollected and quoted are 
those which are felt to be pre-eminently musical; 
it is sure that David and the saints have wrought 
their thought into verse and song to appeal more 
directly to our emotions and thus arouse us to- 
ward God. 

The leader is the creator of the spiritual atmos- 
phere, if there be any; and he is supposed to rest 
and refresh the congregation, to concentrate their 
thought, and prepare their hearts for the recep- 
tion of the gospel. He must be a keen discerner 
of the needs of the moment, alert and possessing 
a judgment not often credited to a singer. A cer- 
tain great evangelist at a critical moment in one 
of his meetings turned to the leader and said, 
"What shall we sing?" The leader was caught 
napping. The psychological moment passed, a 
cool wave swept over the meeting, the life was 
gone from the service. This, too, because the 
man now thoroughly embarrassed could find noth- 
ing that seemed appropriate to sing. 

The hymns and tunes used in the revival ought 
to be selected with care. Haphazard singing 
should be regarded in the same light as haphaz- 
ard preaching. The book containing the music 
must be selected with no other thought in mind 
than the good of the meeting. A new book unless 
made up of hymns especially evangelistic, will 
not be a blessing to the average revival. It will 
be neither a good thing for the book nor for the 
revival. Familiar hymns and tunes may be used 
to such an advantage as to carry with them by 
their stability such new hymns as may safely be 
used in the meeting. Observe that the hymn that 
is triumphant, strong in character, expressive in 
doctrine is the hymn that lives, and one that 
ought to be used upon that occasion. The transi- 
toriness of the popular song book of today is due 
to no other cause than a lack of definiteness in 
expressing any of the genuine needs of the soul, 
or producing any positive conviction in the heart. 
Gospel songs that are potent must produce con- 
viction, urge to decision, and rouse to action. Ap- 
propriate hymns and music are essential to the 
success of a revival. The appropriate song is 
the entering wedge for the message. All preach- 
ers feel the oppression of an inappropriate song, 
and all know instantly the value of the right song 
at the right time. As the martial strains urge 
the soldier into the front rank of battle, so the 
song fitly sung excites in man his deepest devo- 
tion and rouses him to duty. 

Beware of novelty. Some effective songs have 
been utter failures through the introduction of 



novelty which has attracted attention to itself 
rather than to the sentiment of the song. It is 
always safe to use the hymns that are easy to sing 
and have in them real worship. People will al- 
ways sing easy tunes. A good song service is im- 
possible without all the voices employed. Most 
folks sing a little even though they will not al- 
ways confess it. There is a good gospel in exer- 
cise; and the meeting that amounts to the most 
for the individual is the one in which he has had 
a part. Experience teaches that the people en- 
joying the preaching best are those who have been 
singing in the song service whether they could or 
not. The sort of singing that gets people away 
from themselves will give the preacher a company 
of hearers with open hearts and receptive minds. 
; — Northwestern Christian Advocate. 



THE VALUE OF SPIRITUAL MEDITATION. 

Action in the face of emergency is right and 
proper. Nothing can be accomplished without it; 
but meditation has its part in the great struggles 
of life. It is the fountain in which needed force 
is generated. The friction of constant activity 
wears out the machinery, and weakens its opera- 
tion. So it is with the mind and spirit. Emerson 
once said: "Absolve me to myself." He meant: 
"Let me have time for relaxation, so that my 
mental force may recuperate; and let me have 
this time in retirement, where no intrusion will 
interrupt or disturb the processes of my spirit 
and the workings of my mind." It was under 
these circumstances he had time and opportunity 
for thought and silent meditation. 

Christ often retired apart to pray, and occa- 
sionally spent whole nights in the solitude of the 
mountain. Here he had time for communion, and 
his spiri£ found rest. Not only this; here he re- 
covered his exhausted mental energies and re- 
plenished his spiritual powers. It gave him time 
to review his work, to readjust his plans, and to 
forecast the future. After a night of this sort of 
communion on the Mount of Transfiguration, 
where he held intercourse with lofty spirits, he 
returned in power nd demonstration the next 
morning to again take up his work of healing the 
afflicted and preaching the truth to the listening 
multitudes. In meditation he found surcease 
from his burdens, his oppressions, his heart-hun- 
ger and his weariness of spirit. It gave him a si- 
lent moment in which to cast all these experiences 
upon the Father, who was his invisible Helper 
in the work committed to his mind and consci- 
ence. 

John Wesley spent the first hour of every day 
in silent converse with God. From four to five 
in the morning he gave to silent meditation and 
earnest prayer. He owed much to this habit, and 
the world in which he labored owes even more. 
The work which he always crowded into the busy 
day found its source of inspiration and strength 
in this early hour of quiet devotion. Our fathers 
and mothers made much of "the closet". They 
almost invariably had their special time and their 
secret place for this sort of meditation. Many of 
us can well remember that when mother entered 
that private retreat and closed the door, she was 
not to be approached. She had business with the 
King. When we moved in that vicinity, it was 
with soft tread; and when we spoke, it was with 
muffled lips. .She was at prayer, and her spir- 
itual meditation was a sacred part of her relig- 
ious experience. 

We often fear that in our day we neglect too 
much the meditative part of religious life. We 
try to make up for this by substituting active 
plans and good works. The latter. we do not de- 
preciate or discourage, but they can not take the 
place of the former. Our richest spiritual pos- 
sessions come as the result of "the quiet hour", 
the meditative moment when we kneel face to 
face with Him who knows how to strengthen the 
heart and to re-invigorate the soul with better 
purposes and holier aspirations. We need this 
spirit-rest in order to the active pursuits of Chris- 
tian life. How sweet, how refreshing, how uplift- 
ing to draw aside into these moments of medita- 
tion and think over our needs and our plans with 
God! In such moments he draws closer to us, 
and often speaks in tones of encouragement to 
our waiting spirits. — Texas Christian Advocate. 



A typical Cornish Methodist declared that his 
experience had shown him that societies that had 
revivals and led sinners to Christ usually pros- 
pered in financial matters as well, whereas bar- 
ren societies were often burdened with debt. — 
Rev. T. H. Smart. 



6 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 14, 1909. 



From The Field. 



Laymen's Meeting for Shelby Dis- 
trict, January 13th, 1909. 

What should be the minimum sal- 
ary of an ordained preacher. — Doctor 
J. W. McCoy. 

Can the stewards of the church 
bring up the preacher's salary in 
full?— R. B. Miller. 

To what extent is the laity respon- 
sible for the collection ordered by 
the conference? — Rev. W. L. Killian. 

Are we as laymen doing what we 
ought for the conversion of the 
world? — T . A. Anthony. 

J. S. MARTIN, 
District Leader. 



Kannapolis. 

The good people of Kannapolis 
charge have done much to make us 
realize that this is the glad season 
of gifts. After providing the parson- 
age with furniture necessary to make 
us comfortable, they filled the pantry 
with good things too numerous to 
mention. 

The day after Christmas the board 
of stewards met and made provision 
for our year's support. They did not 
come empty-handed, but left us 
much encouraged and with grateful 
hearts. May this good people share 
abundantly the world's first Christ- 
mas gift — the love and peace of God. 
Respectfully, 

J. H. SELLARS. 

Jan. 6, 1909. 



D. 11. Johnston, P. E. Rollins, B. J. 
Dobbins, A. S. Tanner, ad infinitum. 

Perhaps the most notable thing 
that has been brought about recent- 
ly is the organization of the Baraca 
classes in each church. These class- 
es are doing a great work here. The 
membership is rapidly increasing. A 
most sumptuous banquet was given 
by the class at Henrietta a few nights 
ago. 

Plans are on foot to organize Phil- 
athea classes at both places. 

Large and attentive congregations 
attend preaching. 

The Laymen's Association of this 
charge are arranging to have a ban- 
quet in the near future. They are 
planning for large things. Col. W. 
B. Stubbs, general secretary, and C. 
H. Ireland, of Greensboro, have been 
invited to be the chief speakers. 

B. 



Haywood Street, Asheville. 

Our pastor, Rev. T. L. Lallance, a 
transfer from a western conference, 
arrived some weeks ago, and entered 
heartily into the work at Haywood 
Street church. 

He comes to us highly recommend- 
ed as a preacher and as an all-round 
worker. Our expectations have been 
more than met. He is tireless as a 
pastor, brilliant, able, and spiritual 
as a preacher, and scholarly in the 
true sense of the word. We are well 
satisfied. 

Our congregations are growing ev- 
ery Sunday. 

Sincerely, 

J. A. WILD. 



West Greensboro. 

I desire to acknowledge with a 
deep sense of gratitude a bountiful 
.old-time Methodist pounding from my 
people during the Christmas holi- 
days. We have been "pounded" be- 
fore, but at no time and by no peo- 
ple, more bountifully. We appreciate 
this, the more for the reason that 
this is the beginning of the fourth 
year on this charge. Whether it ' be 
so or not, I regard it as specially sig- 
nificant, for which I thank God and 
take courage. Out of a ministry of 
26 years, including the present, we 
have spent sixteen in Guilford coun- 
ty; namely, East Greensboro, Sum- 
merfield, Walnut Street, and West 
Greensboro. I disclaim all responsi- 
bility for such relations. I would 
rather suffer than be guilty of manip- 
ulation, or "kick" when assigned an 
appointment. 

Truly, 

J. A. BOWLES. 



Trinity College Notes. 

t College exercises were resumed on 
Wednesday morning after a recess 
for the holidays beginning December 
22d. The mid-year examinations will 
begin Wednesday, January 20, and 
will continue till February 1, when 
the second term will begin. 

At intervals of two years a series 
of . lectures is given under the aus- 
pices of the Avera Department of 
Biblical Literature. This series of 
lectures was established in 1897. The 
seventh series will be delivered this 
year by Bishop E. E. Hoss, of Nash- 
ville, Tenn. These lectures are look- 
ed forward to with very great pleas- 
ure. They will be delivered in Crav- 
en Memorial Hall and the public is 
cordially invited. The exact date for 
the series to begin has not been def- 
initely settled, but it will be the lat- 
ter part of March or the first of 
April. 

Dr. W. H. Glasson, of the depart- 
ment of Political Economy and Social 
Science, attended the meeting of the 
American Political Science Associa- 
tion in Washington and of the Amer- 
ican Economic Association in Atlan- 
tic City during the holidays. 

Professor and Mrs. Olin D. Wana- 
maker, of Baltimore, have been on a 
visit to Professor and Mrs. W. H. 
Wanamaker, at Trinity Park. Prof. 
Olin D. Wanamaker is now connected 
with the Woman's College in Balti- 
more as Adjunct Professor of Eng- 
lish. For a number of years he was 
Professor of English and for some 
time acting president of the Canton 
Christian College In China. This col- 
lege was founded by a wealthy phil- 
anthropist of New York with the 
hope that it will ultimately grow into 
a modern University for South China. 
It is under no denominational con- 
trol, but broadly Christian in spirit. 
In this institution all the students 
are required to pay tuition, and they 
come from the very best class of the 
Chinese — many being sons of high of- 
ficials. It has had official recogni- 
tion for excellence by the Mandarin 
of the province, and apparently is 
destined to do great good for the 
whole country. 



to be paid through the envelopes 
monthly on the circuits and weekly 
on the stations. 

A large share of the attention of 
the meeting was directed toward the 
evangelistic work which the district 
is undertaking this year. Rev. Z. E. 
Barnhardt was appointed by the Bish- 
op to the work of Missionary Evan- 
gelist for the district this year. Since 
conference the presiding elder has 
employed Rev. W. T. Carner, a local 
preacher, who has been serving as a 
supply. These two brethren are to 
give their entire time t evangelistic 
work in this district this year. Their 
work was placed under the supervis- 
sion of a committee which makes 
their engagements and has general 
oversight of their work. The presid- 
ing elder is one of this committee 
and has largely the directing of the 
work. Through the large liberality of 
certain valuable laymen in the dis- 
trict and the co-operation of our 
Board of Missions the salaries of the 
evangelists have been provided for. 
They have each held one successful 
meeting since conference and already 
have engagements which will keep 
them busy for months. There is a 
spirit of expectancy extant and great 
things are confidently looked for this 
year. The laymen who have put as 
much as $100 apiece into this evan- 
gelistic work are enthusiastic over 
their investment. 

D. M. LITAKER. 



Among those who have recently lo- 
cated here for school advantages are 
Mr. C. C. Moore, of Stanley, and Mr. 
Robt. Davis, of Mooresville. 

The next lecture in the course 
which is being given through the 
year will be delivered in the auditori- 
um on Tuesday January 19th, at 7:30 
p. m., by Rev. Dr. Turrentine, of Sal- 
isbury. 

The church at this place is in fine 
condition under the pastorate of Rev. 
W. E. Poovey, who also continues to 
teach mathematics in the school. The 
Connelly Springs circuit is being ac- 
ceptably served by Rev. J. F. Moser, 
one of our students. 

Looking backward we are gratified 
with the progress made; looking for- 
ward we are hopeful of better things 
promised; looking upward we are 
strengthened for the faithful perform- 
ance of the things which our hands 
daily find to do. 

January 9, 1909. 



The Brotherhood. 

I have read with interest the arti- 
cle by Dr. Chreitzberg concerning 
"Our Conference Brotherhood." He 
said substantially what I wanted to 
say. Let us proceed right away — not 
wait for the annual conference — to 
organize and complete our organiza- 
tion at Hickory. I nominate Dr. 
Chreitzberg as temporary Secretary 
and treasurer, with full power to act 
until our next annual conference. All 
in favor of this send your names to 
the Advocate right away, thus em- 
powering Dr. Chreitzberg to act on 
the plan suggested by him in the last 
Advocate (7th inst.). I do not regret 
a penny I have put into the relief 
fund for the widows and orphans of 
our fallen brethren, but I am opposed 
to the policy adopted by the brethren 
at Nashville. The attained age idea 
may do for "insurance companies," 
but not for an organization like ours. 
It is unbrotherly to freeze out the 
older brethren who most need this 
aid. Let us organize now. 

Fraternally, 

W. S. HALES. 

January 9, 1909. 



Canton First. 

The following clipping taken from 
the Canton Vindicator will be grati- 
fying news to all who rejoice to see 
tokens of the progressive spirit: 

"The Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, of Canton, has the honor of 
having paid its conference collections 
in full the first Sunday of 1909— and 
is the first church in Western North 
Carolina Conference to have paid its 
assessment so early in the year. This 
amount was raised with very little 
trouble, notwithstanding the fact that 
the assessment last year was on- 
ly $180.00 for the whole circuit, while 
this year Canton as a station is as- 
sessed $260.00. Our church is grow- 
ing in numbers and strength, and with 
the best minister in the conference 
Canton will become one of the lead- 
ing churches. Brother L. B. Aber- 
nethy is an untiring worker and a 
popular pastor." 



Henrietta-Caroleen. 

We have been very graciously re> 
ceived by the noble people of th*se 
prosperous towns. Last year, not- 
withstanding the financial depres- 
sion here, all the claims were paid 
In full. This charge last year paid 
for all purposes the largest amount 
in its history. And the outlook for 
the new year is bright and hopeful. 

Our laymen are wide awake busi- 
ness men, headed by such men as 



Mount Airy District Meeting. 

On the 29th and 30th of December, 
there met in Elkin the pastors, dis- 
trict stewards and lay leaders of the 
Mount iry district. While the at- 
tendance was not full it was repre- 
sentative and active. 

The presiding elder, Rev. W. M. 
Bagby, advised a uniform financial 
system for the district, and explained 
the envelop system. After thorough 
discussion, this was unanimously 
adopted. The pastor's salaries are 



Rutherford College Notes. 

On January 5th the spring term be- 
gan with largest attendance of any 
opening in the history of the institu- 
tion. Forty new students have en- 
tered, making a total enrollment of 
about 210 to date. Nearly all old stu- 
dents have returned after spending 
the holidays at the respective homes. 
The work is already in full swing and 
the new students are becoming infect- 
ed with the spirit of earnestness. 

Prof. Otho J. Jones has resigned 
his position as professor of History 
to accept the pastorate at New Lon- 
don; and Prof. Anderson Weaver, for- 
merly of the Weaver school, has been 
elected to fill the vacancy. He is 
here and has already begun to get a 
strong hold on the student body. 

On the 7th inst. an enthusiastic 
meeting of the Board of Trustees was 
held. Among other things, it toOK ac- 
tion for the immediate material im- 
provement of the present main build- 
ing, and formulated plans looking to 
the erection of a new main building 
of brick. 



Mills River. 

A word from my field of work per- 
haps would not be out of place. 
There are many things of interest 
to be said about this work if this 
people had somebody to say them, 
but I can't say or write much. But I 
can do much thinking ("As he think- 
eth in his heart, so is he.") about 
the good generous people that in- 
habit these parts. Our people are 
above the average for intelligence 
and when you come up against some 
of them you will find it out. (You 
see I know.) They know many 
things and one thing they know well 
and that is how to pound their 
preacher. This year, of course, we 
were not expecting a pounding, but 
to our surprise it was a double-head- 
er, and many after strokes that let 
us down gently. 

On December 23d, the ladies of our 
Mills River church began to file in 
with many valuable presents. Among 
the ladies there "was a young man 
with a sack of r our on his shoulder, 
marching towards the pantry and 
you all know that that was a great 
relief to a preacher especially for big 
breaders. Then on the 25th here 
came another pounding from the oth- 
er side and for several days valua- 
ble gifts came from those that did 
not get into the first. There are no- 
where to be found a more hospitable 
people, in fact they carry this name, 
and worthily too. 

The board of stewards raised the 
salary considerably this year and 
some of our churches are now per- 
fecting plans to pay their salary 
monthly. There cannot be found in the 
Western North Carolina Conference 
a more loyal set of men to the church 
and to their preacher than is found 
on this work. Brethren, this charge 



January 14, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



7 



will not be vacant for two more years 
after this year, if I have anything to 
do with it; but alas! 

We hope by earnest, faithful work 
to return to this people their kind- 
ness. Our work is looking up we 
trust, and we are earnestly looking 
for God to bless us with an outpour- 
ing of his spirit this year in all the 
churches, and to this end we are 
praying and working. 

Before closing let me thank my 
people, for their kind reception and 
their generous pounding. 

Truly yours, 
J. W. WILLIAMS. 



All preliminaries can be arranged 
after we get into position to help any 
brother who may suddenly fall by 
the way. At the Annual Conference 
at Hickory all details can be ar- 
ranged to the satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. Let every brother who sends 
in his own name send also three 
names of interested laymen. Give us 
a good list for next week. All old 
members do not pay initiation fee. 

Yours truly, 
H. F. CHRBITZBERG, 
Monroe, N. C. 



The Southern Methodist Handbook. 

The Southern Methodist Handbook 
for 1909, will be out in a few days. 
The editor in preparing the Handbook 
has striven to carry out the motto, 
"The best yet." Send all orders to 
Smith & Lamar, Nashville, Tenn. 
Fraternally, 
THOMAS N. IVEY, 

Editor. 



Morganton District Notice. 

I have placed Rev. W. B. Davis in 
charge of Spruce Pine circuit. 

R. M. HOYLE. 
Morganton, N. C, Jan. 7, 1909. 



Western North Carolina Conference 
Brotherhood. 

Dear Brethren: — The re-organizing 
proposition is meeting with the ap- 
probation of the brethren. One 
brother writes: "I have just read 
you letter in the Advocate and wish 
to thank you for the stand you have 
taken in reference to the Brother- 
hood. Your proposition is a good one. 
I will suggest however that you make 
a call to all old members at once, 
with the understanding that the 
preacher's wives who belong to the 
connectional concern be admitted as 
clerical members. Also that a call 
for $2.00 be made at once for the first 
assessment; then when a member 
dies make another call, so as to have 
an assessment on hand all the time." 

Another writes: "I have been look- 
ing for just such a message from you 
as I see in the Advocate this week. 
I thought if you did not come out with 
such a call you should do so. You 
may place my name on the list for 
our Conference Brotherhood. I will 
do all I can to help push it to the five 
hundred dollars." 

Dr. J. H. Weaver is in hearty ac- 
cord with the re-organization idea, 
and will unite to make it a success. 
The following names have been sent 
in: Revs. J. H. Weaver, S. B. Pick- 
ens, C. M. Pickens, J. B. Tabor, W. 
V. Honeycutt, N. R. Richardson, and 
H. F. Chreitzberg. 

We now make a call upon all our 
old members who will go with us, to 
send in their names at once. Don't 
stand back, brethren. I propose to 
pay to this fund even before I pay 
a dollar to any other call of the 
church. From letters I have received 
from those who have been benefited 
by the Brotherhood, I am led to infer 
that, if preachers do not look after 
one another's interests, few others 
will. I have never believed that God 
is better pleased with money spent 
for missions, or any other urgent call 
of the church, than he is with that 
which is given to the, at times, desti- 
tute families of the men who have 
surrendered all for the call to the 
ministry. No claim need conflict 
with other claims, yet it is a fact 
that the eye of the church is kept up- 
on every other claim, while few cher- 
ish this. 

I do hope every one who will read 
this call will send in his or her name 
for membership. Preacher's wives 
will have to fall into the list of the 
laymen, unless a majority will con- 
sent otherwise. New members will 
send in $2.00 initiation fee. Should 
this fee be reduced, due credit will 
be given. 





Uneeda Biscuit 

What makes them the best 
soda crackers ever baked ? 

What makes them the only 
choice of millions ? 

What makes them famous 
as the National Biscuit? 

National-Biscuit-Goodncss— 



Notes and Comments from Holston. 

1. Small Charges in Town and 
Country. — Since the meeting of the 
Holston Conference in October, and 
of the Western North Carolina Con- 
ference in November, attention has 
been called to the continued practice 
of making small pastoral charges in 
the mountain sections of these con- 
ferences. It is not possible to ac- 
count for these by any general rule 
of classification. In Holston there 
are 19 charges in 1908 reporting not 
more than .100 members and 25 oth- 
ers having not over 200 members. 

Of the 19 with less than 100 mem- 
bers nearly all are mission charges 
and are doubtless portions of former 
circuits cut off for some special rea- 
son to form a new charge. One 
charge, a station, with 71 members 
paid the pastor $700 in 1908, to which 
was added an appropriation from the 
conference board of missions of $150, 
making pastor's support $850.00 for 
the year. Another, a circuit with 55 
members, paid preacher $66.00, and 
had no appropriation from the 
Board. 

Of the 25 charges having over 100 
and not more than 200, 12 were self- 
supporting and 13 were given aid by 
the conference board of missions. The 
smallest amount on the self-support- 
ing charges was $351 paid to pastor. 
The largest amount paid by those 
having mission funds to aid in pas- 
toral support was $650, and $150 was 
added for mission work, making the 
pastor's support $800. The small cir- 
cuit with 106 members, in four 
churches and paying $351 for the pas- 
tor is not in mission territory. 

One of the mission circuits with 
six churches paid only $121, and re- 
ceived $75 from the conference board 
of missions, making $196 as the sup- 
port of the preacher for a whole year. 

While these incidents may make an 
extreme showing and indicate a meas- 
ure of neglect for some of our fields 
of. labor, as preachers; and special 
favor to others, the fact is evident, 
that the gospel should be preached 
by us even where the people are not 
able to bear the cost of pastoral sup- 
port. 

In some Holston circuits places of 
worship which were formerly well at- 
tended are not now very convenient 
to the people who are Methodists, but 
other churches should be put in place 
of these, if they are left off of the 
circuit plan. When a circuit is rob- 
bed of its best church to make a 
small station, the outlying country 
churches ought not to be made mis- 
sion charges. When one of the larg- 
er circuits is divided into two charges 
both being circuits, neither one 
should be put into the mission list. 

If two preachers, one a young man 
without much experience, cannot 
work together on the same charge, 
^then we should make some revision 
of our pastoral training. A few sub- 



Of Course ! 




Sold only in 
Moisture Troof 
"Packages 




pastors working and studying under 
wise seniors might be more success- 
ful as undergraduates than those tak- 
ing correspondence courses at Van- 
derbilt University. 

It is not possible to turn all our 
circuits into stations or Presbyterian 
pastorates, without greatly reducing 
the support of the preachers. 

2. Missionary Evangelists in Hol- 
ston. — The two missionary evangel- 
ists, J. B. Ward and D. V. York, were 
continued in that service for 1909, 
and the board of missions called for 
the preachers of each district to offer 
their services free of charge as evan- 
gelists, to be used under the direc- 
tion of the board in such of the weak- 
er charges as could not be served by 
the regular evangelists. 

The larger part of the time of the 
two evangelists was spent in the 
stronger charges where the work of 
the pastors was such that evangelists 
were needed, but their expenses could 
be provided for by the people. The 
mission territory of the conference 
was not reached by them extensively. 
Evangelists for the circuits and mis- 
sion charges need to be supplied and 
ought to be provided by the board of 
missions, even if some mission charg- 
es should be abolished. 

The net increase of members in 
Holston was 2,444, the total addi- 
tions during the year being 7,713. Of 
this total 5,077 were added by form- 
ula or on profession of faith and the 
remainder by certificate. Additions 
by certificate do not always increase 
the membership in the conference be- 
ing changes from one charge to an- 
other. 

The number of societies in the con- 
ference is 820 this year, being a de- 
crease of 21 and the number of Sun- 
day schools is 760, an increase of 31, 



The increase in Epworth Leagues is 
10 and in League members 74. 

The number of local preachers is 
211, same as last year. The increase 
in Sunday school scholars is 6,129, or 
1,922 more than the church members. 

These figures may be in error to 
some extent. Several charges failing 
to report in part and errors in other 
reports, may make considerable dif- 
ference in the footings. The past 
year was one of success in a great 
many charges and the small net gain 
is almost unaccountable. 

J. R. PAYNE. 

Washington College, Tenn. 



Madison and Mayodan. 

We have made a good start in the 
new conference year at Madison and 
Mayodan. 

Large congregations greet me in all 
good weather at Madison, and every- 
body is so kind to us that if we had 
previously been enemies, we should 
surely now be killed with kindness. 

They have been pounding us with 
sausage, spare-ribs, back-bones, flour, 
sugar, coffee, oranges, tangerenes, 
eggs, neckties, canned fruits, pocket- 
handkerchiefs, and other things use- 
ful and ornamental, and a lot of 
Christmas and New Year's dinners 
thrown in besides. 

Madison folks are a peculiar peo- 
ple. They have a way of making 
folks feel comfortable all over. Their 
warm hearts and kind words make 
one love them, and feel determined to 
be true and faithful to them as a pas- 
tor and minister of the gospel of 
Christ. We are just beginning at 
Mayodan. We have a few good and 
faithful people there. And we hope 
for progress in due time. 

B. MARGE SON. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 14, 1909. 



The Christian Life, 



"YE SHALL KNOW HEREAFTER." 

I cannot always see the way that 
leads 

To heights above; 
I sometimes forget He leads me on 

With hand of love; 
But yet I know the path must lead 

me to Immanuel's land, 
And when I reach life's summit, I 
shall know 

And understand. 

— Selected. 



THE MINISTER'S MOTHER. 

The richest parishioner of the 'it- 
tie church told the pastor on pray- 
er-meeting night that she was going 
on a journey, and then she spoke of 
the proposed route. 

"Why, your way leads through Pin- 
ley," the minister exclaimed, his pale 
face lighting up, "and at Finley lives 
— my mother. I wonder if you could 
— if you could stop and see her?" 

The richest parishioner looked into 
her pastor's expressive face. 

"I am going to stop there two 
days," she answered gently, "and I 
shall be very much pleased to call 
upon her. How long since you have 
seen her?" she queried, still gently. 

A shadow crossed the minister's 
face. "Five years in reality, but in 
spirit I am always with her. My 
blessed mother! No son had a bet- 
ter one." Then, with wistful insis- 
tence, "You are sure you will stop 
at Finley?" 

"Very sure, and I will bring you 
back your mother's every word." 

The richest parishioner arrived in 
Finley in due time. 

"Aunt Katharine," she said to the 
elderly relative she was visiting, "my 
pastor's mother lives in this t.)wn. 
Perhaps you know her?" 

Aunt Katharine, comely and com- 
fortable, was bustling about in the 
kitchen. "What is her name," she 
asked. 

"McDonald — Mrs. Rachel McDon- 
ald." 

Aunt Katharine came to the win- 
dow and pointed to a dwelling only a 
little distance up the street, small 
and unpretentious, and guarded by 
a white picket fence. 

Mrs. McDonald lives there," re- 
plied Aunt Katharine. "I know her 
well; one of my best neighbors, a.id 
almost the oldest inhabitant." 

"Will you go with me to see her, 
then?" asked the niece. 

"Gladly, and whenever you like." 

And it so happend that same after- 
noon they knocked at Rachel McDon- 
ald's door. A woman, large, no'ile, 
and white-haired, opened it. She 
glanoed at her two visitors; at rhe 
older woman with a smile of wel- 
come, at the younger one with gen- 
tle kindness, quite unmixed with o.u- 
riostiy. 

"My niece — Mrs. Percival — -Mrs. 
McDondald," announced Aunt Katha- 
rine. "She came to see you becaase 
she is from your son's town in Ihe 
west and a member of his church." 

"Ah!" It was good to see how r.he 
old face lighted up. 

"From my son's church. Oh, what 
a privilege it is to see you! Five 
years— five years since I last saw 
him. Is he well — is he quite well? 
He was never strong — but come in, 
come in. 

She ushered them into a clean .".ti- 
tle room with braided rugs about and 
plants blooming in the windows. A 
bouquet '"f carnations stood in a v'ise 
on a small table covered with a wuite 
cloth. 

"I had a birthday last week and ioy 
son sent me these. They were ^uite 



fresh, all but one, and I put that away 
to press. Malcolm knows how I love 
flowers. Now sit down and teil me 
about my boy — of his work, of his 
wife, of the baby I have never seen." 

And so the richest parishioner, sit- 
ting opposite the strong, noble neith- 
er in that humble home, told what 
she knew. She spoke of the minis- 
ter's Bible class, the young mei.'s 
league he had inaugurated, the .ser- 
mons he preached, the souls he had 
touched, the calls he made, the 
friends he held, and his kindness 10 
the sick and afflicted. 

The old mother sat and listened, 
losing not a word. Her wrinku'd 
hands clasped together, her head bent 
forward. "It's just as I knew it 
would be," she answered dreamily. 
"Malcolm was always such a bless- 
ing to his mother; and he longs to 
see me. I don't tell him how ny 
heart hungers for him — it wo.ild 
grieve him, so far away. My boy, 
still my little boy that I used to rock 
to sleep — whose prayers I used to lis- 
ten to. Oh, if I could only gather 
him in my arms again! and to think 
my little lad is out in the world help- 
ing people. Oh! I am glad like Han- 
nah of old, that I had him to give to 
the Lord. It is all right, only the 
separation is hard." 

And then as she looked into the 
strong old face with its line of char- 
acter and kindness, the richest par- 
ishioner knew whence had come tne 
minister's religion and what a goodly 
inheritance was his. 

"How alike they are!" she mused, 
"and I wish he might see her." 

And then the thought came to her, 
"Why not — why not?" 

"Kate," her husband had said to 
her at parting, "I'll get tickets for 
two this time, and then if any of 
your friends want to come back with 
you, just bring her along." 

"But there will be nobody, Ralph," 
she answered, "at this season of the 
year." 

"Never mind," he had said; "an 
extra ticket won't come amiss and 
we can afford to be generous. Take 

it." 

And so the matter ended. 

Kate Percival thought of it now. 
She thought, too, of the overworked 
pastor with his growing brood, of 
the salary not large enough for all 
their needs, and of his look as he 
had told her of his mother — the deep 
love reflected in the patient, spiritual 
face. 

"Why shouldn't people who have 
money use it for those who have 
not?" *?**f 

"Mrs. McDonald," she said sudden- 
ly, "I have bought an extra ticket in 
case I wanted to bring back a friend. 
Aunt Katharine here won't use it, and 
will— you? I am going on to my 
journey's end, but in two weeks I 
will be back to take you home with 
me." 

The strong old face opposite sud : 
deniy melted into tears. "Me!" =he 
cried. . 

"Why not — you must see your son's 
church and the parsonage and the 
baby — and the son himself." 

Kate Percival had risen and had 
taken hold of her wrinkled hand. 

"You will come, will you not?" she 
entreated, "for his sake — he loveT you 
so." 

And so it came that the son who 
could not go to see his mother had 
his mother brought to him. 

An eastern train two weeks later 
steamed into the little western sta- 
tion. Among the passengers were 
two people, one woman young and 



beautiful, with an older one, wrink- 
led and white-haired, yet with a com- 
manding grace and dignity all her 
own. 

A man, tall and pale, with eager 
eyes, was waiting. As she came 
down the steps of the car, the older 
woman saw him. 

"Mother!" he cried, striding to- 
ward her and folding her in his arms. 
"Oh, mother, mother!" 

"My son!" she whispered, in a 
choked voice. 

He dropped his head upon her 
breast and the two stood quite still, 
wrapped in each others arms. The 
richest parishioner had turned away, 
but the next moment the minister 
grasped her by the hand. 

"Let me thank you," he cried brok- 
enly. 

"Don't," she entreated smilingly, 
"Don't, for if you do, I warn you, I 
shall — " And then the beautiful li"s 
quivered. "I — I have no mother; she 
died two years ago. Can you not see 
how pleased — what a privilege I 
deemed it to bring you yours?" 

The minister looked into her face 
and saw the grief that a mother's 
Iofs must ever bring. 

"God bless you," he murrain ed. 
"God bless you! Yes, yes, I uncier- 
stand." — Exchange. 



be crushed by sorrow who is unsel- 
fish in a sense of sympathy with oth- 
ers, or in a sense of the duty of lov- 
ing service for others. Selfish grief 
absorbs the soul in thought of self. 
— Henry Clay Trumbull. 



Gladness is but the fragrant exhal- 
ation of love, and love, embodied in 
gentle innocence ever looks out up- 
on the world from Bethlehem. — C. S. 
M. 



The web of human history has been 
beautified and strengthened with 
threads of silver and gold whenever 
the hands of Christian womanhood 
have filled the shuttle and given it 
impetus. — C. S. M. 



THE FUNDAMENTAL THING. 
"The really fundamental thing in a 
man's life is his choice of a religion. 
Two religions are today struggling for 
the mastery. There is the religion of 
Mammon, whose dominant purpose is 
selfishness and whose creed is indif- 
ference to moral considerations, ex- 
cept so far as they may be regarded 
as instruments of individual advance- 
ment. There is the religion of God, 
whose purpose is service, and whose 
creed is loyalty to something larger 
than yourselves." — President Hadley. 



HOME LIFE SHOULD BE IDEAL. 

Home and home life must never be- 
come commonplace. The little sur- 
prises, the remembrance of the birth- 
day, the unexpected treat, the pleas- 
ure earned for one by the sacrifice 
of another — all these belong under 
our head of spiritual exercises. Nor 
is there any scene of our life which 
so demands' such exercise as this fa- 
miliar scene of home which has to 
be reset every day. — Edward Everett 
Hale. 



THE ONLY BARRIER. 
Those who attack the Bible, the 
churches and the Christian faith are 
undei mining the very foundations of 
society. No true friend of mankind 
will countenance such attacks. The 
religion of Christ is the only barrier 
against the rising evils which threat- 
en our age. Self-defense, if no other 
motive, would urge business men, edu- 
cators and scholars to defend and 
strengthen religion, the churches and 
their agencies.— Rev. Alexander Pat- 
terson. 



CHRISTIANS SHOULD EE DIFFER 
ENT. 

Christians should be different from 
other people. They are the sons of 
light, and the light should be shilling 
in their lives in all their ways. They 
should be happier than other people, 
for they are friends of Christ, are 
forgiven, are God's children, and have 
Heaven and glory before them. Their 
lives should be more holy and beau- 
tiful than other people's lives, for 
they belong to Christ. They should 
be at peace among themselves, loving 
each other. They should be discour- 
agers of all unbeautiful living and en- 
couragers of the faint-hearted in their 
efforts to be true. They should be 
ready always to lend a hand to the 
weak and should be patient and long- 
suffering toward all men. They should 
never return evil for evil, but always 
be loving and kind no matter what 
others may do. They should rejoice 
always and thank God for every- 
thing. They should never quench 
the Spirit in their hearts. They 
should let their whole life be given 
up to God, for His use and keeping. 
— The Daily Bible. 



To be overpowered by sorrow is to 
be selfish in sorrow. One can never 



MEANIN OF GOD'S DELAY. 
God may delay to come in the guise 
of his providence. There was delay 
eie Sennacherib's host lay like with- 
ered leaves around the Holy City. 
There was delay ere Jesus came walk- 
ing on the sea in the early dawn, or 
hastened to raise Lazarus. There was 
deiay ere the angel sped to Peter's 
side on the night before his appointed 
martyrdom. He stays long enough 
to test the patience of faith, but not a 
moment behind the extreme hour of 
rred. — Meyer 



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J. D. HELMS, Manufacturing Chemist, 

310 S. Elm St.. Opposite McAdoo Hotel, Greensboro. N. C. 



.anuary 14, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



» 



Our Little Folks. 



FOR SPELLERS. 

When "ei" and "ie" both spell "e, " 
How can we tell which it shall be? 
Here's a rule you may believe 
That never, never shall deceive, 
And all such troubles will relieve — 
A simpler rule you can't conceive. 
It is not made of many pieces, 
To puzzles daughters, sons, or nieces, 
Yet with it all the trouble ceases: 
"After C an E apply; 
After other letters I." 
Thus a general in a siege 
Writes a letter to his liege; 
Or an army holds the field, 
And will never deign to yield, 
While a warrior holds a shield 
Or has strength his arms to wield. 
Two exceptions we must note, 
Which all scholars learn by rote. 
Leisure is the first of these, 
For the second we have seize. 
Now you know the simple rule. 
Learn it quick, and off to school': 
—St. Nicholas. 



A DREAM THAT MIGHT HAVE 
BEE TRUE. 

It was very warm, and Jamie was 
tired. He had been riding on his bi- 
cycle all the afternoon, and now lie 
was sitting in the vine-covered arbor 
in the lawn, waiting for the clock to 
strike half past eight, which was his 
bedtime. 

But presently as he leaned back 
with his eyes half shut, he he;.rd 
steps coming nearer, and when he 
opened his eyes he saw a queer lit- 
tle man standing before him. 

The little old man had a 'arge 
knapsack on his' back, and carried a 
bulky parcel in one hand. He nod- 
ded to Jamie and said, "Good even- 
ing!" Then he sat down, and took 
off his hat and fanned himself v ith 
it,- as if he felt quite at home. 

"Are you a peddler?" asked Jamie, 
waiting some moments for the old 
man to speak. 

But the old fellow smiled at his 
question, and shook his head. 

"I will tell you my business," ne 
said briskly, "I am a collector." 

"What do you collect?" inquired 
Jamie, "postage stamps, or coins, or 
autographs? I've tried collecting all 
those things myself, and I would like 
to see your collection ever so much." 

The old man smiled again. Then 
he said: "No, I don't collect things 
of that sort; I am a sort of collector 
of waste." 

"A collector of waste!" said Jamie, 
much puzzled. "Why I never heard 
of such a collection before. I don't 
understand what you mean by waste. 
Where do you find it, and what is it 
like?" 

"That is just what I am going to 
tell- you," said the old man, as he un- 
strapped his heavy knapsack and laid 
it down. "The world is full of waste 
collectors like myself, only you have 
never been favored with a sight of 
one before. We go about collecting 
everything the human beings waste — 
time, opportunities, money, happi- 
ness. All these things we gather up 
from day to day, and sometimes our 
loads are frightfully heavy, I can tell 
you. Look at this knapsack and Vds 
parcel — all collected today!" 

"Dear me!" said Jamie, "I wish 
you would show me some of che 
the things you have there.. Couldn't 
you do it?" 

"If I show you anything, I will 
show you your own waste, for you've 
given me lots of work collecting it," 
replied the old man. 

"I'd like to know what I've wasted 
today!" exclaimed Jamie, indignant- 
ly. "Now that's nonsense," 



"It is, hey," said the old man, with 
a keen look. "Well, then, I'll prove 
that it's true, and I'll make you „wn 
it, too, before I go. I have not time 
to open my knapsack now, but I v/ill 
read from my memorandum book the 
list of all you've wasted today." Amd 
he took out a small book and turned 
the leaves, saying: "Jamie — yes, 
here is your account; now listen. In 
the first place, you wasted thirtten 
minutes this morning lying in bed 
after you were called and told to get 
up. Then, when you were only half 
dressed, you wasted eight minutes 
more looking out of the window at 
two dogs that were fighting. So much 
before breakfast. In school you lost 
ten minutes of the study hour draw- 
ing pictures in your copy book and 
you wasted eleven minutes more over 
that newspaper you carried to school. 
When you came home, instead of go- 
ing directly to your room to wash 
your face and hands and brush your 
hair, as your mother requested, «-ou 
spent nine minutes grumbling on the 
stairs before you obeyed her. Vou 
stopped in the street to talk to Tom- 
my Rose, and wasted twelve minutes 
of your music lesson time, ne- 
sides — " 

"Oh, stop! Do stop!" cried Jamie, 
interrupting the old man. "Don't tell 
me any more about the time I've 
wasted, please." 

"Well, I'll tell you about the other 
things, then; your wasted opportuni- 
ties, for example. You saw a bird's 
nest robbed today, and never sail a 
word when you might have saved it. 
When you saw a little boy drop his 
marbles* you only laughed at him, 
when you might have helped him to 
pick them up. You -let your sister 
take that long, hot walk to the post- 
office this afternoon, when you could 
have gone there so easily on your bi- 
cycle. Then you were so inattentive 
to your history lesson in school, fou 
flew into a passion, too, because your 
shoe string was in a knot — wasted 
opportunity of self-control. You for- 
got to rise and offer your mother a 
chair when she entered the room — 
wasted opportunity to be polite. You 
bought chewing gum after resolving 
never to buy it again — wasted moiiey 
and wasted good resolution. But I 
have read enough to prove what I 
said. Take pains, my dear boy. It's 
in your power to lighten my daily 
load very much. But hark! Your 
mother is calling you; don't waste 
a moment, I beg. Goodnight." 

Jamie sprang from his seat and van 
toward the house. The old man had 
vanished. — Outlook. 



HOW TO MAKE A GOOD BOY. 

"They all put brandy in them," 
said one. 

"They all don't. My mother has 
never put a drop of brandy into her 
mince-pies since the day Rob said he 
could taste the brandy and it tasted 
good. Mother said then it was 
wrong, and she never would be sujlr 
ty of it again; and if mother says 
a thing is wrong, you may be sure 
it is wrong, for what mother knows, 
she knows." 

"How about mince-pies? Are ym 
sure she knows how to make pLes 
good?" And a laugh went up from 
a group of girls gathered around the 
register of the recitation room mating 
their lunch. But some of them 
winced a little when back were toss- 
ed these words: "If she doesn't, she 
knows how to make a boy good, and 
isn't a boy worth more than a mince- 
pie?" — Christian Standard, 



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HOW SHE MADE HER FIRST 
CAKE. 

She measured out the butter with a 

very solemn air, 
The milK and sugar also, and she 

tooit the greatest care 
To count the eggs correctly, and to 

add a little bit 
Of baking powder, which, you know, 
beginners oft omit; 
Then she stirred it all together 
And she baked it for an hour; 
But she never quite forgave herself 
For leaving out the flour! 

— Exchange. 



ALFRED'S PRAYER. 

"Mamma," said Alfred one night as 
he was going to bed, "I prayed God 
would keep us children from quarrel- 
ing; but He has not answered that 
as yet, for sister Daisy and I quarrel- 
ed dreadfully today." 

"Ah, my son, you will have to help 
the Lord to answer that." 

"Help the Lord, mamma? Can't 
He do everything?" 

"He won't make you good against 
your will. If you choose to oe a 
naughty boy God will be grieved. Put 
when Satan tempts you to quarrel 
if you turn right to God for strength 
to resist him, and fight like a yood 
little soldier, then Cod will give vou 
the victory. But He won't do the 
work for you." — Olive Plants. 



"Dicky," said his mother, "when 
you divided those five caramels with 
your sister, did you give her three?" 

"No, ma. I thought they would'nt 
come out even so I eat one 'fore I 
began to divide." 



One day Owen was riding with his 
papa and mamma in the country 
when he saw a cow in a field with a 
calf by her side and a bell on her 
neck. "Mamma," he said, "why does 
that cow wear a bell?" Mamma lid 
not answer, her attention being other- 
wise employed. Owen waited a little, 
and then safd: "Is it to call the calf 
to dinner?" 



Lues, there comes one supposedly 
commonpxace industry which has 
been carried to such a successful 
i.nd scientific development as prom- 
ises to become a business of much 
importance, almost as the cotton, 
steel or lumber features of our devel- 
opment. 

Everywhere there has been a hue 
and cry about the diversification of 
crops, and among the first to t:ike 
the lead in this line was Mr. C. M. 
Gibson, of Young's Island, South Car- 
olina, who, with others, several years 
ago began growing cabbage in a small 
way, and during the past ten or fif- 
teen years this business has develop- 
ed to immense proportions, and at 
this time several thousai d cars of 
this product is shipped from this :m- 
mediate section every season to the 
various Eastern, Northern and West- 
ern markets, resulting in returns of 
from one-half to three-quarters of a 
million dollars annually. 

Along with this industry sprang a 
demand for cabbage plants, which de- 
mand has been increasing from year 
to year, until at this time it has be- 
come necessary to employ extra force 
to carry out in detail the excellent 
system of raising and packing the 
plarts, and handling the flood of co- 
ders which come pouring in. 

In connection with this plant busi- 
ness, Mr. Gibson has gotten out a 
very neat little catalogue which is 
full of information about growing cab- 
bage, and will be found considerable 
benefit to all who are interested in 
this lin°, and which he will take 
pleasure in mailing to anyone unon 
request. 

Those who have done any business 
with Mr. Gibson in this line will tes- 
tify as to his straightforward, busi- 
nesslike manner in the treatment of 
his customers. It may be safely as- 
serted that there cannot be found a 
better source from which to purchase 
cabbage plants, whether for the farm, 
truck garden, or for the smaller home 
garden. Send for the Gibson cata- 
log. 



"CABBAGE INDUSTRY." 

Along with the rapid development 
of the South among other advancing ^Z^^8£ W S2S*J£ 



JO 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 14, 1909. 



Woma n s F. M. Society. 

Conducted by Mrs. L. W. Crawford, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Self is the only prison that can ever 

■[ bind the soul; 
Love is the only angel who can bid 

I the gates unroll; 
And when He comes to call thee, 

• arise and follow fast; 
His way may lead through darkness, 
but it leads to 
Light at last. 

* — Henry Van Dyke. 



RECIPE FOR A SUCCESSFUL SO- 
CIETY. 

In consulting our cook book we find 
that the recipe for good bread, seems 
equally adapted for a successful soci- 
ety. Let us begin with the ingredi- 
ent Salt, which, wrote the little boy, 
"is something which spoils every- 
thing if you don't put it in," therefore 
we will be careful to put in our mis- 
sionary salt which we will liken to 
a personally prepared, practical, per- 
severing, patient, progressive Presi- 
dent Personally prepared with a 
precise purpose, a positive piety, a 
persuasive personality, which per- 
vades every presentation of the work, 
with practical plans for its prosecu- 
tion, which provides a particular in- 
vitation for every woman in the 
church to participate in its develop- 
ment, accompanied by a pressing plea 
for its support. Persevering in every 
perfomance of duty, patiently ponder- 
ing perplexing problems, and prepar- 
ing profitable, and pleasing programs, 
she' proves that missionary SALT is 
a' preservative of missionary interest. 

Yeast. — "Good, light bread is im- 
possible without yeast and we find 
that what yeast does for bread, pray- 
er does for the missionary society. 
Earnest, faithful, persevering, thank- 
ful prayer must precede its organiza- 
tion, and be the first, the continuous 
element of its character, if it would 
rise to true success." 

Milk — is another ingredient re- 
quired for fine bread. "Some persons 
claim that the use of water makes it 
rise higher, and look lighter. This is 
substituting looks for flavor, and a 
fine appearance for nourishment. So 
in our desire for attractive programs, 
and entertaining society meetings, let 
us not neglect a frequent use of Gad's 
word for our direction and encourage- 
ment. In searching for news let us 
not pass by our Father's instructions, 
but study His will, and "as new born 
babes desire the sincere milk of the 
word that we may grow thereby." 

Sugar. — Having put our salt, yeast, 
and milk together let us add a pinch 
of sugar to sweeten it withal, which 
we will call tact. "Tact to win oth- 
ers to join the society, tact to inter- 
est the indifferent, tact to win the 
gifts both small Mid great from every 
woman in the church, tact to per- 
suade each member to take part in 
the educational program, in short, 
consecrated common sense is our mis- 
sionary sugar." 

Flour. — "All other ingredients are 
useless without the flour which binds 
them together and gives them sub- 
stance. The flour is not enthusiasm, 
not intellectual brilliancy, not work, 
but love. Not the love of natural 
human kindness, but a love growing 
out of our love for the Lord Jesus, 
which enables us when we look into 
each other's faces, to recognize the 
"Tie that binds our hearts in Chris- 
tian love." This is the love which 
gives us patience, and unflagging 
zeal, this is the love which must be 
permeated by the milk of the Word, 
and acteu upon by prayer, binding all 
together, that there may be bread 



to furnish for the world's heart hun- 
ger." 

The needful ingredients having 
been furnished, they must be thor- 
oughly mixed together with faith, 
that our souls may be strengthened 
thereby, and kneaded persistently 
with sacrifice, that no gaping holes 
of selfishness appear, and render it 
dry and tasteless, and it fail to nour- 
ish the soul. 

Fire. — "When the ingredients are 
thoroughly mixed, and the yeast has 
done its work, it is not yet ready for 
use, but must go through another pro- 
cess, it must be subjected to fire. A 
firs which has lost its freshness, will 
not suffice for good baking, we must 
have a bright, hot fire, the heat from 
which shall reach every part of the 
loaf. Under such conditions we shall 
have a perfect loaf, a veritable staff 
for the natural- life. So with our mis- 
sionary society. After the organiza- 
tion is complete our work will be 
fruitless unless subjected to the pow- 
er of fire, the fire of the Holy Spirit, 
which must reach and influence, the 
entire membership." 

How to Serve. — Our bread having 
been prepared according to the most 
approved recipe, and properly baked, 
let us be careful in serving it at our 
meeting. 

Although it is the staff of life, it 
may prove unpalatable, and even 
cause chronic indigestion if partaken 
in too large quantities. 

Generous slices are appreciated by 
the hungry soul, but the fastidious 
palate of the twentieth century wo- 
man, must be tempted with dainty 
tid bits, if we would succeed in creat- 
ing and sustaining a missionary ap- 
petite. Therefore slice it thin. Brev- 
ity is a slice seldom offered at our 
meetings. "Better feel regret be- 
cause you stop too soon, than because 
of your much speaking. Have a care 
lest you make your friends twice 
glad." Be brief, be concise, be bright 
and your bread will find a ready mar- 
ket provided you are careful to re- 
move the crusts which are disagree- 
able to sensitive mouths. Avoid the 
critical remark, the sharp word, the 
crusts which often interfere with nu- 
trition. 

Don't fail to butter your slices well 
with attractive programs, pleasing 
pictures illustrative of your study, 
maps, blackboard exercises, and an 
occasional missionary solo, or recita- 
tion. Serve on the fine china of 
Christian cordiality, and your thin 
bread and butter will be appetizing 
and thoroughly enjoyed by all who 
partake. As the Lord Jesus broke 
the bread, and fed the multitudes by 
the Sea of Gallilee, so may He con- 
strain us by His love, to break our 
bread, and feed the multitudes in 
darkest heathendom who perish for 
the bread of life. 

MRS. G. B. GERMOND. 



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give the public the entire benefit, for a short while, to show the style and 
quality of our work. We satisfy all wlio deal with us. 

Send check or PostofBce Money Order. Stamps accepted for one pair. Prices 
are per pair of two (2) Irons. 

No. 1. Regular price, $ .65. Our price, 29c. 
No. 2. Regular price, $1.00, Our Price, 42c. 
No. 3. R gular price. $1.00; Our price, 47c. 
No. 4. Regular price, $ .75; Our price, 32c. 

No's. 2 and 3 are extra high, fancy irons, as above cuts show, and hav^ bars 
detachable, so bars can be replaced when burned out, at a trilling cost. 

No's. 1 and 4 are strong, serviceable, and attractive irons. 

We also do all kinds of machine work, on Automobiles or any kind of ma- 
chinery. New machines designed and built to order. 
Castings of any kind. Lowest prices on everything. 

GASTON IRON WORKS, GASTONIA, N. C. 

B. Frank Norris, P rop. and Gen. Man. 



The men of Wesley Memorial 
church, the great institutional church 
projected five years ago, to the pas- 
torate of which Rev. Frank Siler, of 
the Western North Carolina Confer- 
ence was transferred last fall, have 
organized themselves into a brother- 
.hood under the name of "Jonathans." 

One of the objects of this organiza- 
tion is to reach and save to the 
church this inflowing population. A 
central office has been opened at 413 
Prudential building, with Z. S. Cow- 
an, an active Methodist layman, as 
secretary. The pastors and people 
throughout the church reading this 
notice will perform a needed service 
if they will send names, with their 
Atlanta addresses when possible, of 
all persons coming to Atlanta for any 
length of time, to Mr. Cowan who 
will promtly report them to the sev- 
eral committees representing this 
movement, who will gladly introduce 
them to the churches of the city. 




An Important Request. 

Of the 130,000 people in Atlanta, 
44,000 are said to be identified with 
tne churches, while one-half the re- 
maining population, 86,000, have, or 
have had, their membership else- 
where. The exceptionally large num- 
ber of students in the business, den- 
tal and medical colleges and other 
institutions of learning, together with 
the fact that Atlanta is becoming 
more and more a commercial center, 
the headquarters of a vast army of 
traveling men, partly accounts for 
this showing; there are 10,000 stu- 
dents within her borders alone away 
from home. " 



TWO BOXES OF TETTER1NE CURE 
TETTER CASE OF 10 YEARS' 
STANDING. 

"I have been troubled with a severe 
case of Tetter for ten years; I have 
tried doctors in nearly every state in 
the unim, as I am on the road all the 
time. In ColumMa last week a druggist 
recommended Tetterine. I laughed at 
him, but bought a box; that gave me 
relief, so I bought another and am en- 
tirely well. I shall take great pleasure 
in tellirg all people In the show busi- 
ness ^f your marvelous skin remedy." 
Lew Wren, Chicago, 111. 

Tetterine cures Eczema, Tetter, Ring 
Worm, Ground Itch. Infant's Sore Head. 
Pimples, Boils. Rough Soaly Patches on 
the Face, Old Itching Sores. Dandruff, 
Cankered Scalp, Bunions, Corns. Chil- 
blains, ard every form of Skin Dis 
ease. Tetterine. 50c; Tett^-ine Soap, 
25c. Your druggist, or by mail from the 
manufacturer, The Shuptrine Co., Sa- 
vannah, Ga. 



FREE TO YOU 



LORD'S PRAYER BANGLE PiN 

We mean what we sav. We will 
send to vou ABSOLUTELY FREE 
THIS LOVELY BANGLE PIN with 
the entire Lord's Prayer engraved 
on it if you will send "us 2 cents in 
stamps to pav for mailing. 
REED MFC. CO., 73 Sun St. ,PR0VIDENCE,R.I. 



Special Notice t) Ministers! 

A minister, in small city, or riding circuit, 
can increase his income in a good, benevolent 
work ; not a book , not agency business. Write 

THE COLUMBIAN WOODMEN 

122 Peach tree St. Atlanta, Ga. 



CHAS. W. MOSELEY.MC.D. 

Practice Limited to 

Diseases of Stomach and Intestines 

Opposite Guilford Hotel 
OVER FARISS-KLUTZ DRUG CO., 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Office Phone 571 * Residence 1345 
Office : 22 1 S. ELM STREET. 
Hours 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
2 p. m. to 5 p. m. 



FROST PROOF 



CABBAGE 
PLANTS. 

GUARANTEED TO SATISFY PURCHASERS 

Price: 1,000 to 5,000 at $1.50 per 1,000; 
5,000 to 9,000 at $1.25 per 1,000; 10,000 
and over at $1.00 per 1.000. Our cata- 
logue gives full instructions for grow- 
ing all kinds of fruits and vegetables, 
and mailed on request. Wm. C. GER- 
ATY CO., The Cabbage Plant Men, P. O, 
Box, 670, Young's Island, S. C. 



January 14, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



11 



Woman's H. M. Society. 

Mrs. W. L. Nicholson, Editor, Charlotte, N. C. 



such disadvantages. How good it is 
to hear of larger collections from all 
the districts. God bless you all. — 
Editor. 



Dear Home Mission Folks: — The people's societies, and the Brigade, 

card below tells its own sweet story, explaining the origin and object, and 

I am sure we one and all congratu- closed by speaking of the Baby Roll, 

late heartily and wish for this new- it was all so beautifully and impres- 

comer and her mother the happiest sively done, I regretted she did not 

New Year: have a much larger audience. 

"Charlotte, N. C, Dec. 30, 1908. The Waynesville auxiliary seems to 

"Dear Sister Copeland: — It is with be in a flourishing condition, judging 

pleasure and gratitude that we can from the corresponding secretary's 

announce the birth of our first born, report, which shows one hundred and 

a daughter. The mother is doing fifteen dollars and ninety-five cents 

well. With sincerest regards, I am, expended for local work during the 

Yours very truly, last two quarters. They have added 

"W. L. NICHOLSON." new comforts to the parsonage by the 

The editor has worked right up to addition of some new furniture, new 

the New Year, even furnishing wall paper, screens for windows, and 

"copy" for this week. doors. This was last summer. Nine 

For the next few weeks, however, new names were added to the Baby 

she will be busy getting acquainted Roll during the two last quarters, 

with her new daughter, and I ask through the efforts of Mrs. Branner, 



your forbearance while I try to 
in" for the time. 

MRS. T. J. COPELAND. 



fill 



third vice-president. Under the en- 
th"siastic leadership of Miss Marga- 
ret" Stringfield, as lady manager, the 

Brigade promises to do good work. 

The little one whose coming is i am sorry there are only two Bri- 
chronicled here, has returned to Him gades in the district, 
who giveth and also taketh away. A The "Week of Prayer" service was 
tender flower transplanted at once in- observed by the Waynesville auxili- 
to the Garden of God. ary by an all-day service. The pro- 

•To me the death of a little child gram was carried out in full; differ- 
has in it all the elements of soul- ent members taking the various top- 
tragedy. On the one side we remem- i CSi with hymns and prayers inter- 
ber it is safe — safe from all harm vening. The meeting was made even 
and all care forever and ever. On m0 re interesting by our Home Mis- 
the other hand we not only lose the s i 0n pictures being tastefully ar- 
baby, but the little girl, the growing ranged on a large screen, Mrs. Bran- 
daughter, the- bride, the mother she n er, in her own interesting way, ex- 
was to be. plaining the work each one repre- 
"Oh, God, do they miss us there? sents. These were left in the church 
Babies need mothers so, over Sunday. The pastor, Rev. M. A. 
Do they grow up there loving us? Smith, kindly giving opportunity for 
God in Heaven! We need their love ner to talk of the work to the large 
so." audience present at the morning ser- 
We would not though even to en- vice. How well she did this can be 
rich our starving hearts have them judged by the following clipping: 
lonely there among the angels. No, "Mrs. M. J. Branner made a very 
a thousand times, No.! interesting talk on Home Missions at 
Oh, is that the way the Father the Methodist church last Sunday, 
loves us? The thought makes our ghe had many pictures to illustrate 
soul life real. He does! He does! the many phases of the work at dif- 
And more! ferent points in this country. Her 
Father, we give them thee. Care audience was interested from the be- 
for them till we come. Tell this ginning to the end of her talk- 
mother and father this in thine own Waynesville Courier." 
way and they will understand. The collection for the "Week of 
MRS. COPELAND. Prayer" was larger than last year, 

and it is hoped the service was an 

It is good to enter the New Year inspiration to all present, 
with "tidings from, the field." All of we had hoped to have an account 
these letters reached the editor just G f how the week was observed by 
before the holidays, but too late for the Brevard auxiliary, but we are con- 
publication then. We are sure they fi<jent it was a success, as we feel 
will suffer in no wise from the delay, they can be depended on to do things. 
There can be diminution of interest, In t he language of one of the mem- 
only renewed interest, because they berS! " It j s better to see them at work 
seem "messengers of hope" for what t han to hear about it." Their report 
is in store for us this year. The past for i ast quarter shows they have not 
year was the best we have ever been i^e. The amount of money ex- 
known, and we confidently expect it pended for local work being one hun- 
to be "better further on." While dred and forty-three dollars, 
chilling winter holds the world in its What shall I say for the auxiliaries 
icy grasp, let the Home Mission wo- i n t he country places, where there is 
men keep "our page" sparkling with no mea ns of communication, with bad 
messages of cheer and the sound of weather, muddy roads, etc? Not- 



GASTONIA AUXILIARY. 

The Woman's Home Mission Soci- 
ety, of Main Street Methodist Church, 
Gastonia, N. C, observed the "Week 
of Prayer" jointly with the Woman's 
Foreign Missionary Society during 
Thanksgiving week, and we feel that 
the meetings were very helpful in- 
deed to all who were fortunate 
enough to attend ( and this joint ses- 
sion of prayer seemed to draw the 
two societies closer together. The 
programs each evening were extreme- 
ly interesting and instructive, and in- 
spired us to press onward with new 
vigor in this great and noble work for 
our Master. A very attractive fea- 
ture of these meetings was some spe- 
cial music provided by some of the 
members of both societies. We had 
a regular attendance of from twenty- 
five to thirty every afternoon during 
the week; and I firmly believe there 
was not one who attended these meet- 
ing but felt her Christian life had 
been strengthened and went away 
with a desire to accomplish more for 
the good cause. 

Our society now has a membership 
of forty-four, with a good average 
monthly attendance. All departments 
of the work are taken up with zeal. 
We feel very proud of our faithful 
and efficient president, Mrs. R. L. 
Swan. She is bringing things to pass 
by her enthusiastic efforts, and has 
our monthly meetings "full to over- 
flowing" with something good and in- 
structive. She has special commit- 
tees appointed to visit among the cot- 
ton mills, around our town, also to 
visit the sick and strangers. I think 
our auxiliary is learning more and 
more the most important thing of all, 
to "scatter sunshine." 

We send Christmas greetings to 
all of our sister societies, and hope 
that the incoming year may be the 
best we have ever had in Home Mis- 
sion work. 



for the year 1909. As Mr. Soper told 
us of conditions as he himself saw 
them on the frontier, I could but 
think, "What a fruitful field for 
the Home Mission worker! During 
the latter part of the evening, we 
were delightfully entertained with 
lectures, Dr. Soper lecturing on gen- 
eral conditions, Dr. Brown on life in 
the Orient, he having been a mission- 
ary to the Philippines, and Professor 
Ghee giving us an insight into condi- 
tions and needs in China. 

The spiritual uplift that resulted 
from this institute, will not soon be 
forgotten, and our prayers will ever 
attend the devoted leaders. 

HATTIE IVEY WHITE, 
Corresponding Secretary. 



The above report was sent by Mrs. 
James Atkins, the newly elected 
"Press Reporter" at Gastonia. We 
welcome each accession to the ranks 
of >our "Press workers." May we 
"Press on" to great achievements. 
Let us hear from you again. Con- 
tinue to "scatter sunshine." — Editor. 



And the editor would have so en- 
joyed attending that meeting and par- 
taking of its privileges. It was good 
to be there, no doubt. But it has us- 
ually been her lot to miss most of 
these meetings which furnish inspira- 
tion and information, and to be forced 
to depend on hard labor for stimulus 
to activity. And in this I feel God's 
goodness manifest. As a result of 
this meeting we confidently expect 
West Market Home Mission women, 
who already hold the banner, I be- 
lieve, to excel themselves this year in 
growth, in increased knowledge and 
its certain sequence — increased giv- 
ing. — 'Editor. 

$65 PERM0NIH« i r^"t^ 

t rig. to intro luce our Poulty Kemp- 

dies. Bank ref's given. Don't an's. unless you 
mean business. 

Eureka Pou.try Food Mfg. Co., Dipt. 58, Easi St. Lou s, 111. 




victory. 



withstanding all the inconveniences 
the band of faithful women at Bethel 
are still keeping up the organization. 
This alone speaks much for their en- 
thusiasm and devotion to the work. 
Respectfully yours, 
DELIA EVANS FINCHER. 



FROM WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT. 

My Dear Mrs. Nicholson: — Per- 
haps a short article from - the 
Waynesville district might be of 
some interest to your readers. At the 

request of the district secretary, Mrs. 

M. J. Branner, the fond mother of the The Waynesville district is never 

W. H. M. Society in the Western in the rear. You are doing fine work 

North Carolina Conference, repre- over there, Sister Fincher. Our dear 

sented the work at the district con- Sister Branner renders valiant ser- 

ference, to the great enjoyment of all vice in the field or at home. May 

present. She showed how perfect many more like her be raised up. The 

was the organization, beginning with Brevard auxiliary, through Mrs. Nor- 

the adult auxiliaries, explaining the wood, sent a most encouraging report 

general work, both connectional and Also your country places nearly al- 

local. Then she told of the young ways do well, for they labor under 



WEST MARKET STREET. 

I wish, dear editor, that you and all 
the rest of the Home Mission folks, 
as Mrs. Copeland is pleased to call 
us, could have enjoyed with us, 
"Thanksgiving week" a missionary 
Institute. It was interdenomination- 
al and was conducted by three wid- 
awake men, Rev. Edward Soper, gen- 
eral secretary of the Young People's 
Movement; Rev. W. A. Brown, one of 
the field secretaries; and Prof. Ghee, 
a member of the faculty of Soochow 
University, China. There were three 
sessions daily for three successive 
days, and it kept us "hustling" to be 
there everytime, but I am sure no one 
regretted the sacrifice. The after- 
noon sessions were devoted to a dis- 
cussion of plans and methods of 
teaching in the Sabbath school, and 
to the Sunday school worker. The 
information was invaluable. The 
first hour of the evening was given 
to the study circles. There were 
three of these, and it was an univer- 
sal regret th"t it was necessary for 
them to be taught at the same hour. 

The text books used were "The 
Moslem World;" "The Uplift of Chi- 
na;" and "The Frontier." I chose 
the latter, as it is one the reading 
courses of the Home Mission Society 



THE 

Miniature Grand 

Just think, — a wee little 
grand piano only 5 ft. long! 
A wee little grand piano, so 
small it requires only a little 
more space than an upright, 
yet contains all the tonal 
beauties and the perfect ac- 
tion of the large grand and 
a wonderful volume. 

Small enough for the 
smallest parlor; tone enough 
for the largest parlor. 

Costs little more than an 
upright piano, and within 
reach of the most economi- 
cal buyer. 



CHAS. M. STIEFF 

Manufacturer of the 
ARTISTIC STIEFF, SHAW, & 
STIEFF SELF-PLAYER 
PIANOS. 



Southern Wareroom 

5 West Trade St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

C. H. WILMOTH, Mgr. 



12. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 14, 1909. 



An Atlanta Physician la Curing 
Catarrh by a Simple Home 
Remedy and will mail a 
Trial Treatment 
Free. 

Those who have' long doubted 
whether there really is a successful 
remedy for catarrh will be glad to 
learn that Dr. Blosser, of Atlanta, Ga„ 
has discovered a method whereby ca- 
tarrh can be eradicated to the very 
last symptom. 

He will send a free sample by mail 
to any man or woman suffering witli 
catarrh, bronchitis, asthma, catarrhal 
deafness, chronic colds, stopp°d-up 
feeling in nose and throat, d'^cult 
breathing, or any of the many symp- 
toms of catarrh. 

Dr. Blosser's Remedy is radically 
different from all others, being sim- 
ple, harmless, inexpensive and requir- 
ing no instrument or apparatus of any 
kind. 

If you wish a demonstration of what 
this remarkable remedy will do, send 
your name and address to Dr. J. W. 
Blosser, 204 Walton street, Atlanta, 
Ga., and you will receive by return 
mail a free package and an illus- 
trated booklet. Write before you for- 
get it. 



MIGHTY FINE DOCTOR 



The Sunday School Lesson. 



LESSON III.— JANUARY 17, 1909. 
The Beginning of the Christian 
Church. 

(Acts ii, 22-47.) 



Golden Text. — They continued stead- 
fastly in the apostles' teaching and 
fellowship, in the breaking of bread 
and the prayers. — Acts ii, 42. 



"I had a mighty fine doctor," 
writes Mrs. Hattie Cain, "and he 
advised me to take Cardui for my 
troubles." 

Mrs. Cain's case was a strange one 
and rather unusual, in that she had 
suffered so long before she obtained 
relief, so it makes it all the more 
interesting to learn how, at last, Car- 
dui relieved her. 

"For 16 years," she writes, "I 
suffered dreadfully. I would have 
to have a doctor every three months, 
and Oh ! how I suffered ! I would 
cramp and have convulsions, till it 
looked like I would die. 

"My doctor said an operation was 
necessary, hut I said I would rather 
die, so he advised me to try Cardui, 
which I did. I began to mend right 
away, when taking the first bottle, 
and now I have been well for 7 years 
and can do more work and walk and 
go where I please." 

All reliable druggists sell Cardui. 
It is a standard remedy on their 
shelves, for which there is a steady 
demand, due to its genuine merit. 
Full directions for use accompany 
every bottle. 

Try Cardui. 

THIS SPACE BELONGS 

Robt. W. Murray 
General Insurance 

308 1-2 SOUTH ELM ST., 
Greensboro, N. C. 

PHONE 163 

DEAF 25 YEARS 

Can Now Hear Whispers 

I was deaf for 25 
years. I can now g 
i hear a whisper 
& with my artifl- 
Cial EAR DRUMS 
m in my ears. You Medicated Ear Drum 
yy>i cannot see them Pat. July 15.1908 
s in mv ears. I Can 

? Not Fael Them for they are perfectly 
comfortable. Write and 1 will tell you 
a true story— How I Got Deaf— and How 
I Made Myself Hear. Address 

CEO. P. WAY 





8 Adelaide SI., 



Detroit, Mich 



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"Diversity of Gifts, But the Same 
Spirit." 

Peter, "standing up with the 
Eleven," was but one of twelve speak- 
ers. He, as the foremost man, gives 
the representative discourse, but the 
others were as well endowed as him- 
self for this special service, and there 
were hearers enough for each to have 
his group. They all had one theme, 
the undivided - Christ, and one call, 
the acceptance of him as Prince and 
Savior. The one Holy Ghost gave to 
each his thought and utterance. As 
it was in the beginning, so it now is; 
no speaker can say it all. Paul, Ce- 
phas, has his own word and style, 
divided to each by the Ordainer's 
will, and it is for him to do his best 
with it. Any one of the Twelve 
could, with the Divine aid, tell 
enough for any hearer's salvation. 
"Believe Also in Me." 

These listening groups were "de- 
vout men," believing the prophets 
and zealous of the Law. These had 
been serving as "schoolmasters" to 
bring them to Christ. To him these 
had borne witness, telling in many 
an utterance about his love and suf- 
ferings, his words and deeds. Pet- 
er's hearers believed in the God of 
their fathers, and recounted his 
mighty works. By these they came 
to the very edge of Christianity; wby 
stop there? One thing they lacked. 
Belief in Christ meant surrender to 
his call, and to them he had "no 
beauty;" they "hid their faces from 
him." Indeed, many may not have 
heard of him. But their faith in their 
father's God would almost persuade 
them to his Son. 

An Ennobling Address. 

Conciliation at the start is a speak- 
er's first rule. "Israelite" is to this 
day the almost sacred Jewish desig- 
nation. It owns the Jew as descend- 
ed from a "prince" who "prevailed," 
and it owns his race illustrious and 
imperishable, to whom came "the 
adoption and the glory." David was 
ever a star specially bright in the 
Jewish sky, and his tomb beneath the 
Temple court made the Temple his 
monument. Thus Peter's words, as 
if framed by art, awoke in his hear- 
ers' consciousness lofty and luminous 
emotions, and quickened them to 
hear. Peter simply gave "what the 
Holy Ghost speaketh." 

Things Already as True. 

That the Messiah was to be David's 
son and yet David's Lord, was be- 
lieved, but not understood. That Da- 
vid spoke clearly of some life (sou') 
not left in the realm of the depart- 
ed, whose body was not to return to 
its elements, also was believed, De- 
cause so said the Scripture. "How 
can these things be?" David died like 
other men. So far all agreed, but 
there begins the mystery. 
Foregleams of Christ's Resurrection. 

A glow like a dawn rising on a 
night sky hangs over David's words. 
He speaks as moved by the Holy 
Ghost to say what he and none un- 
derstood. The vision tarried a thou- 
sand years, then all came true. Tiie 
life of a Son of David was not left in 
"hell," nor saw his flesh corruption. 
The pondering and surmising were 
long, and a strong party held that 



there is no resurrection. Yet the 
truth was not left without witnesses. 
The life of the world to come, though 
not often named in Scripture, was a 
known comfort, and many went to 
their rest in hope. 

"Dark Sayings of Old." 

No prophecy of Scripture is- self- 
explaining. The prophets who utter- 
ed the words sought in vain to know 
what the Spirit in them did signify, 
as to the Messiah's sufferings and his 
glory. In the event all became clear. 
Alike obscure was it that the Mes- 
siah should be cut off from among the 
living, and be deathless; should be 
David's Lord, and David's son. This, 
too, has come clear, but these people 
do not see it. The Great Teacher 
had baffled the doctors of the Law 
by asking them to explain just this: 
"David in spirit — that is, by inspira- 
tion— calleth him Lord; how is he 
then his son?" "We can not tell." 
Neither could these men, devout 
though they were. 

Pricked in the Heart. 

One thing came strangely clear to 
them — their wrongness with God. Af- 
ter Robert Moffat had for several 
years taught without a convert, he 
was one night awakened by a crowd 
around his house, weeping in an .ig- 
ony over their sins, and imploring bis 
prayers. Their sin had come to their 
conscience as "exceeding sinful." So 
under Peter's words the Spirit opened 
the inward eye. They saw and felt 
their grievance of Divine love, and all 
the sad things of man's ingratitude. 
Blessed is such pain of heart! Mild, 
or sharp, it begins the soul's health. 
"What Shall We Do?" 

Adapt yourselves to the new order 
of things. To induce men to this was 
the aim of Jesus' teaching, and now 
Peter, and as many as follow him to 
this day, pray us to be reconciled to 
God. This means turning from sin 
of heart and life to loyal service in 
Christ's calling. Emotions may vary; 
duty is plain. Consciousness of 
wrong and a sense of that darkest 
of things, the Divine displeasure, may 
bring an agony; surrender to Christ 
brings unutterable peace. 

A Wondrous Unity. 

A fellow feeling makes the whole 
world kin. One grief, one Savior, one 
pardon, in which all alike obtained 
joy and gladness. In the flush of the 
new life it is not strange that worldly 
business, even worldly possessions, 
sank for a time out of sight, and the 
wondrous experiences brought all in- 
to the family of Him from whom the 
heavenly family is named, of him 
whose voice all heard. 

A Morning Comes. 

Abraham from far away had seen 
its dawn, and now the Son of Righ- 
teousness has fairly risen. The 
world's future glory was not in Cae- 
sar's palace of power, nor in Athens' 
schools of learning; it was with these 
Twelve. This third hour of the day 
was the epoch of conversions, the be- 
ginning of a work not to cease until 
the ends of the earth shall see its ef- 
ficiency, and all shall know Christ 
from hte least unto the greatest. To 
aid in this work we are called, and 
we here see the hope of our calling. 
Do we frame ourselves for eternal 
life, and accept the call? "I give un- 
to them eternal life." — A. B. Hyde, 
D. D., in Pittsburg Christian Advo- 
cate. 



lie, if you are conscious that you are 
not what you pretend to be — that you 
are really a different person from 
what the world regards you — you are 
not strong. There is a restraint, a 
perpetual fighting against the truth 
going on within you, a struggle which 
saps you- energy and warps your con- 
duct. If there is a mote at the bot- 
tom of your eye you cannot look the 
world squarely in the face. Your vis- 
ion is not clear. Everybody sees 
that you are not transparent. There 
is a cloudiness, a haze about your 
character, which raises the interro- 
gation point where you go. Charac- 
ter alone is strength, deceit is weak- 
ness, sham and shoddy are powerless, 
and only the genuine and the true 
are worth while. — Exchange. 




do not like flu f- 
fy or wishy- 
washy float- 
ing islands des- 
serts. 

They want 
something 
good to eat — 
like 

Jell-0 



7 flavors, at all grocers. 10 
cents. 

The Genesee Pure Food Co., Le Roy, N. Y. 




100 
FINE ;-: PIGS 

ON HAND. 

Order before they are 
picked over. 

John A. Young, 

Q EENSBORO, N C 




GENUINENESS. 

There is nothing that will add so 
much to one's power as the consci- 
ousness of being absolutely sincere, 
genuine. If your life is a perpetual 



THE WONDERBERRY 

A Luscious Berry Ripening in Three Months from Seed. 
Luther lliirb.-uik's Greatest Creation. 

pUUIT blue-black like an enormous rich blut berry 
in looks and taste. Unsurpassed f< r eating raw, 
cooked, canned or preserved in any form. The 
greatest garden fruit ever introduced and equally 
valuable in hot. drv, cold or vet climates, tasifst 
plant in the world to grow succeedire anywhere and 
yielding great masses of rich frvit all summer and 
fall -and all winter in pots — (As a pot plant it is 
both ornamental and useful. ) The greatest boon to 
the family garden ever kni-wn. Everybody can and 
will grow it. We are the sole introducer* in all parts 
of the world and offer thousands of dollars in cash 
prizes for which see Catalogue. 

Seed SOc. per packet. 3 packets for SOc, 
A'so our « rent Catalogue of Seeds, Bulbs, Plants 
and New Fruits for lfln9,/rce. 
JOHN LEWIS CHILDS. Floral r.-irk, IV. 1 . 



L H ,'. n COLDBlWC 

for Belling seven- ?5c Ijoxhh **MerIt" 
Blood Tabl«*i< - ri:i>t nllowod to. 
sell Tablets, r»*i ui ij ru<m*y nr.d get* 
ring. Addreis "Merit" Medicine Oo» 
Boom tf<J * CuicJimaUt OU£c«C9 




January 14, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



13. 



The Farm and Garden. 



FARM WORK FOR JANUARY. 

You made plenty of peavine hay 
last summer, of course, and are feed- 
ing it to cattle. So you can load 
your manure, if you have a manure 
spreader, and it will take little time, 
every day that you can drive on the 
land, to load the spreader, and ride 
out and leave the manure spread 
properly on the land that is to go 
in corn in the spring. 

Then if there is a growth of crim- 
son clover on the land you will have 
the best possible chance for a corn 
crop. 



Spread Manure on the Land. 

Do not be afraid that manure 
spread now and left on the surface 
will waste. It will waste less there 
than anywhere you can keep it, even 
on hill land. One winter I was 
spreading manuie on a steep hill 
field, and when we got about three- 
fourths of the way down the hill I 
concluded that there was no need for 
going further, as the manure would 
wash down on that part. But I was 
surprised to find that I could see no 
evidence of the manure three feet 
below where it was stopped. The ab- 
sorptive power of a clay soil held it 
right where it was applied. 

If you cannot haul out manure as 
made, the next best thing is to keep 
it well packed down under the feet 
of the stock, for if torn loose and 
thrown o it it will be certain to heat 
and fire fang. Whenever it is neces- 
sary to move it, move it to the field 
at once and never pile it. 



and using cuss words in getting he 
barnyard manure out. Manure-mak- 
ing is one of the chief matters for 
winter. Bear that in mind and pre- 
pare to make more every year. It 
may not pay much immediate profit 
to feed cattle, but you will make a 
market for the feed and will have the 
manure and beat the fertilizer men. 

When oats were not sown in ihe 
fall, as they should have been, vou 
should lose no time when the land is 
in good condition to plow, to set it 
in order for drilling the oats in Feb- 
ruary. But either for fall or spring 
sowing in the South, I would always 
use the Southern winter oats, as they 
will always give better results in the 
South than the Northern oats. 



The Right Way to Cut the Cotton 
Acreage. 

>4 We will, of course, have the usual 
talk about decreasing the cotton 
area, and none of it done. The only 
rational way to reduce the cotton 
area is to go to farming in a good ro- 
tation, and make money out of other 
things that will reduce the cost of 
growing cotton, and when the cotton 
crop is grown to as large a gross 
amount as now, and is grown on one- 
third the area, there will be no hys- 
terics about the price, for the far- 
mers -will be prosperous through good 
farming, and will not be entirely de- 
pendent on the cotton crop. God 
speed this day. 



See That Your Stock Are Sheltered. 

Feeding stock means good shelter 
if it is x o be profitable. Of course, 
there are mahy days in winter in the 
South when cattle should be out, but 
there are also times when shelter, 
or good sheds, at least, is important. 
Some years ago a farmer wrote to 
me that he thought he could make 
money raising cows to sell to his 
neighbors who kept only one or two, 
and wanted to know what breed 
would be best. "But," he said, "you 
must understand that they keep their 
cows standing out all winter." I 
told him that he needed nothing but 
scrub cows for this purnose, for any 
of the improved breeds would be no 
better than scrubs if kept in this way. 
In fact, they would be worse, for the 
more cattle are improved the more 
care they need. It is perfectly use- 
less to get improved cattle if you are 
going to give them the proper care. 



Shred Corn and Get Ready for Oats. 

If your corn was cut off at the 
ground and cured in shocks it will 
pay to shred it. Shredded stover will 
keep well in stacks, and more of the 
stalks will be eaten, and what is left 
will be in fine condition to heln the 
manure pile, and save breaking forks 



Trucking in January. 

English or garden peas will be the 
first crop to need the attention of 
the trucker. Get them in- the ground 
as soon after New Year's as the land 
can be worked in good order. Cover 
with two furrows and harrow he 
land level before the peas come up. 
Use tobacco stems or tobacco dust in 
the fertilizer, and dust the vines over 
with tobacco dust after they are up 
in order to prev.ent the green lice 
from getting on them, for if they 
once get there in multitude they have 
got you and the crop. Prevention is 
the only thing, and tobacco is the 
best material to use for this purpose. 

In the farther South the early crop 
of Irish potatoes will be going in the 
ground, and in Eastern North Caro- 
lina the land for the potatoes should 
be plowed as early as practicable. 
There would be a better prospect for 
the crop if a good green growth had 
been gotten on the land in the fall 
by sowing some crop like rye early 
enough to get a. heavy fall growth, 
for there is nothing so favorable to 
potatoes as a green growth turned 
under. 

Fertilizers for Peas and Potatoes. 

The pea crop will not need heavy 
nitrogenous fertilization, but as the 
nitrification in the soil is not very 
active in cold weather, it is better to 
use some nitrate of soda on the peas 
along with plenty of phosphoric acid 
and potash. The early Irish potato 
crop, however, will need heavy fertil- 
ization, and the formula I have often 
advised is as good as any. This is 
acid phosphate, 900 pounds; cotton- 
seed meal or fish scrap, 600 pounds; 
nitrate of soda, 100 pounds; and mu- 
riate of potash, 400 pounds to make 
a ton. This is used at the rate of 
1,000 to 1,500 pounds per acre. 



are imported Spanish onions, but 
they can be grown fully as well here. 
Some years ago to a farmers institute 
in Western North Carolina a farmer 
brought specimens of this onion of 
immense size, saying that J had 
taught him how to grow them, and 
he wanted to show how he had suc- 
ceeded. These onions are known as 
the Prizetaker. Sown in the open 
ground, they make good sized onion, 
but to make the immensely large 
ones, we adopt a different plan. 

The seed are sown in January in 
cold frames. The frames are bet- 
ter if covered with glass sashes, but 
in the milder sections of the South 
a cloth covered frame will answer. 
Sow the seed in rows rather thinly, 
and keep protected in the frames till 
after the middle of February. Then 
gradually harden them to the open 
ground when hard freezing is over, 
and if the land is rich and heavily 
fertilized they will make immense on- 
ions, and very wild ones. 

These, too, are poor keepers, and 
should be sold as soon as ripe. Rut 
we can grow the first season fine ripe 
onions from seed by using the Amer- 
ican varieties. The important point 
is to get them started early, so that 
the onions will make before the 
weather gets too hot. In North Caro- 
lina this will be in February as aar- 
ly as the land can be gotten into %ood 
order. In reply to a correspondent in 
North Carolina, I have told about tnis 
crop. 



Success With Onions. 

There is more interest in the onion 
crop every year in the South, and 
when well grown should be profitable. 
There is an increasing demand North 
for young onion plants grown in the 
South for setting there in the spring, 
and this may develop into a profita- 
ble trade, for the young plants the 
size of a lead pencil ship well and 
grow easily when transplanted. the 
earliest ripe crop of onions is that 
grown from sets of the yellow pota- 
to onion planted in the fall. These 
increase by offsets, and these offsets 
can be pulled along in February and 
bunched and shipped as green onions, 
and will pay well, and the larger ones 
can be left to ripen. These should 
be sold early in summer before the 
Northern crop of ripe onions is on 
the market, as they are not good 
keepers. 

Every one has seen big light-col- 
ored yellow onions that are often sold 
at our grocery stores. Some of these 



$25 Worth of Fertilizer Per Acre 
Free. 

Experiments at the Michigan sta- 
tion show that an acre of cowpeas 
added 139 pounds of nitrogen to the 
soil, worth $25, and yet all over the 
South there are men using 200 
pounds per acre of 2 — 8—2 fertilizer 
to grow crops, putting four pounds 
of purchased nitrogen in the land 
from which the humus has been 
wasted, when they might have had 
$25 worth practically free if they had 
farmed right. Rejecting nature's 
ready gift of 139 pounds, and paying 
the fertilizer man about 20 cents a 
pound for four pounds per acre to re- 
place many times as much as they 
have sold in their cottonseed. 

Is there any wonder that these r.ien 
have poor land? 



The more we study about the mat 
ter, the more we re convinced that the 
restoration of the humus to the soil 
far more important than the applica- 
tion of any amount of chemical fertih 
izers. The mineral elements will aid 
us in this when liberally used for the 
production of the legume crops, nut 
the man who spends his money for 
nitrogen is simply wasting it, be- 
cause he could get far more free fer- 
tilizer from the air than he can buy 
in a fertilizer. — Progressive Farmer. 



REMEDY FOR LIQUOR AND TOBAC- 
CO. 

Officers of the Anti-Saloon Leagues of 
several states have endorsed a plan of 
mailing' out free prescriptions for the re- 
lief of the liquor and Tobacco habits, that 
is being carried out by F. Gray, 753 New 
Ridge Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. Either 
prescription can be given secretly, and 
filled by local druggist. The only re- 
quest made is that you enclose stamp 
when writing for them and do not sell 
recipes but give copies to friends. 



For Early Tomatoes. 

The early tomato crop should be a 
profitable one in the South if Hand- 
led right. Every trucker should have 
a little greenhouse at least for the 
purpose of starting plants. \V ell- 
made hot-beds, with glass sashes, v*r)ll 
answer, of course, but the greenhouse 
is far more convenient. The seed lor 
the early tomato crop should be 
sown about ten weeks before it is 
safe to set them outside in the local- 
ity. In Eastern North Carolina litis 
will mean a little after the middle 
of January. 

I sow the seed in shallow boxes, 
and as soon as up large enough to 
handle, I set them in other boxes of 
rich soil about two inches apart. By 
the 20th of February they can go in- 
to cold frames with glass sashes, and 
should there be set four inches apart 
each way. Then protect them care- 
fully, but expose to the air in all 
bright sunny weather, and by care- 
fully hardening them off, they can be 
set in Eastern North Carolina in 
April, and the earlier they are gotten 
out and live, the earlier the crop will 
be. These several transplanting.?, of 
course, take labor and expense, cut 
the crop will be far earlier than from 
plants sown thickly in a hot bed and 
let stand crowded. I have picked 
ripe tomatoes in Raleigh May 25th 
by this method. 



WHY 



do people who use Gowan's 
preparation use it again ai d 
tell th-T neighbors? Because 
it is a great remedy and cures 
Croup, Colds and Pneumonia 
External. 25c; 50c; $1.00. Ml 
drusgiste. Buy to-day. 




INSURANCE 

0 W. CAtCK & COMPANY. 

Office: McADOS BUILDING 

(Next to tn« Post Office. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 
Tornado, Plate Glass 

Accident and Sick Benefit 

Steam boiler. 



Broken Down 

Over-work, worry, mental ef- 
fort, sickness or any strain upon 
the nervous system affects the 
whole body. All the organs de- 
pend upon the nerves for strength. 
If they don't get it they can't do 
the work demanded of them. 
Dr. Miles' Nervine restores nerv- 
ous energy, and builds up the 
uroken down system. 

"Two years ago my wife was almost 
at the point of death with nervous pros- 
tration, I shall never forget how she 
suffered, it was night and day, until we 
commenced to use Dr. Miles' Nervine 
and she speedily began to recover. To- 
day she is enjoying as good health as she 
ever did. _ . 

REV. J. H. HERRHET, I.ititz, Pa. 
If first bottle fails to benefit, money back. 

MILES MEDICAL CO., Elkhart, Ind. 




(incorporated ) 
capital stock. $30,000. 

D 1 1 CI M FQQ When yoa think of groins* to schooL 
DUOIIlLOO write for Cata ojrue anil Special Of- 
fers of the Leadinp; Business and Shorthand Schools 
Address J. H KING. Vres dent Kind's Business Colleg-e 
Kaleitrh, N. Cor Char otte. N. C. 

We also teach Bookkcfpintr. Shorthand, Penmanship 
etc., by mail. Send fur Home Study Circular. 



U27LIEE 0TB2B BULLS 
i SWEETEB, UOEB DUTI- 
ABLE, LOWES PEICE. 

_'EIl XjS. " IKiLS WET. 
*rite to Cincinnati Bell Foundry Co.. Sinclnnati, 0. 



(LYMYER 

| CHURCH ' 



M 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 14, 1909. 



Our Dead. 



"I am the resurrection and the Life.' 
— Jesus. 



We will Insert an obituary of 150 words 
free of charge. For the excess of 150 
words we charge one cent per word. 
Count the words In excess and send the 
money with obituary. Observe this rule, 
please. Do not put in original poetry. 

The above also applies to Tributes of 
Respect. 



"Our people die well," was said by 
Mr. Wesley. How true this state- 
ment to this good day! 

May grace abound unto the sad 
and lonely ones, and ere a tew more 
brief years have passed we will all 
be at "home over there." 

Her pastor, 

A. S. RAPER. 



Wright.— Mrs. Lucie Daniel Wright 
was born near Ruffin, Rockingham 
county, N. C, October 9th, 1877. She 
was married to Mr. E. C. Wright 
April Gth, 1898. She died December 
21st, 1908, at her home in Greensboro, 
after suffering for about five weeks. 
We laid her body in the cemetery at 
Ruffin, December 22d. 

Mrs. Wright was the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Carter, and a 
grandaughter of the late Daniel Guer- 
rant, who was one the staunch Meth- 
odists of Rockingham county, with 
his membership at Mt. Carmel church 
for about seventy-five years. Mrs. 
Wright's mother is sister to Horace 
Guerrant, a Methodist nobleman of 
Danville, Va. No truer or more loyal 
Methodist family than the maternal 
ancestors of Mrs. Wright are to be 
found in Rockingham county. Sister 
Wright joined the Methodist church 
in Ruffin at nine years of age, and 
lived a sunny, cheerful Christian life. 

The writer was in charge of the 
Ruffin circuit in 1891 and 1892. 
Among the first homes he visited on 
the charge was that of Brother Car- 
ter's. Lucie was then some thirteen 
years old. She was a bright, spright- 
ly and cheerful girl. She developed 
into a beautiful and sweetspirited 
Christian woman. I never saw her 
when she was not cheerful and 
bright. She had lived in Ruffin since 
her marriage until recently they 
moved to Greensboro. Sister Wright 
had been singing in our Spring Gar- 
den choir for a few Sundays before 
she was taken sick. Her church 
membership had not been taken from 
Ruffin church. Few have we known 
of a brighter and more cheerful type 
of Christian character. Her father 
passed into the upper world several 
years ago. She leaves her mother. 
Mrs. Cornelia Carter, one brother, 
three sisters, a husband and a sweet 
little daughter nine years of age. The 
grace of Him who sympathizes with 
the sorrowing, bless, comfort and 
keep the bereaved ones. 

N. R. RICHARDSON. 



Scoggins. — Margaret Scoggins was 
born October 1st, 1861, and departed 
this life October 30th, 1908, aged 47 
years and 29 days. 

Her end was in great peace. 

In early life she was converted and 
joined the Christian church, at Ap- 
ple's chapel. After a few years she 
moved her membership to Mount 
Pleasant Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, where she was a faith- 
ful member. 

As long as physical strength would 
permit, she was a regular attendant 
at her church. Even when too weak 
to walk she was carried to the church 
where she enjoyed sweet communion 
with her Lord. The white plague 
caused her days to be cut off. Yet 
during her long illness she was pati- 
ent and expressed herself as ready 
to go. 

She was married to Mr. Charlie 
Scoggins about 25 years ago. To 
them were born 10 children. Four 
have preceded her to the grave. Six 
children and a husband are left to 
mourn her departure. They have 
great hope. Sister Scoggins was hap- 
py the last day she spent on this 
earth, and doubtless entered the 
beautiful city rejoicing in the Lord. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Rev. Jesse S. Nelson. 

When the noble spirit of Rev. Jes- 
se S. Nelson passed from earth to 
heaven on the afternoon of Decem- 
ber 28th, 1908, North Carolina lost 
one of her best citizens, the M. E. 
Church, South one of her most faith- 
ful ministers and his home a hus- 
band and father of that devotion and 
influence for good which will cause 
a vacancy never to be filled. He was 
a man of Nathaniel-like character in- 
deed, a man in whom there was no 
guile and there are many men and 
women in North and South Carolina 
who will testify to the influence for 
good exerted over their lives by this 
man of God as he went in and out 
among them as a pastor, and as he 
proclaimed to them the unsearchable 
riches of Christ in the pulpit through 
a ministry of half a century. 

Mr. Nelson was born in Camden, 
S. C, August 22d, 1832, being more 
than 76 years old when the end of 
his life came. When a young man 
he entered the ministry as a member 
of the South Carolina Conference. 
Later he came by transfer to the 
North Carolina Conference and since 
the organization of the Western 
North Carolina Conference, in 1890, 
he has been a member of that body. 
He was a man of splendid physique, 
of rich intellectual endowment, and 
of a consecration of heart and life 
which commanded and held the con- 
fidence of all who -came in contact 
with him as a minister and in his 
private life. He was a preacher of 
marked ability and filled many pas- 
torates, knowing well by experience 
the meaning of the circuit rider, the 
pastor of the large church, and the 
small and the presiding elder. No 
charge was ever committed to him, 
the slightest duty of which he did not 
discharge with the utmost care and 
faithful efficiency. He possessed a 
Christian experience of richness and 
power, hence the effectiveness of his 
preaching — his sermons came from 
his own heart and reached the hearts 
of his hearers. He had a conscious- 
ness never to be doubted that he was 
a child of God. He "knew whom he 
had believed" and with the perfect 
trust of childhood he knew that He 
was "able to keep that which he had 
committed unto Him." The life of 
this good man was such that no trib- 
ute is too high to pay to his mem- 
ory. He did not know the meaning 
of compromise with evil in any form 
but his whole life was one of the 
simple purpose of the man who car- 
ries the seal of God's approval con- 
stantly upon his life and work. His 
nature was one of modest retirement, 
but one had only to know him to be 
convinced of his daily communion, 
his constant fellowship with his Lord 
and Master. 

He received his last appointment, 
as pastor in the fall of 1903, that ap- 
pointment being to the Belmont 
church in Charlotte. The year fol- 
lowing he retired from the active 
ministry, and since that time lived a 
quiet life at his home in Piedmont 
and exerted an influence for good up- 
on all who visited him. For more 
than a year he was in failing health, 
but he never lost interest in the af- 
fairs of his home and his church. It 
was the privilege of the one who 



writes this tribute to visit Mr. Nelson 
often during the last years of his life 
and the memory of this association 
remains as a blessing. 

When the end came it was just as 
he would have requested, a simple 
falling asleep without a struggle. The 
next day his body was laid to rest in 
Elmwood, Rev. W. W. Bays conduct- 
ing the service. He and Dr. Bays 
were close friends and the latter was 
with him often in his last illness. Mr. 
Nelson spoke of his leaving this 
world with the confidence of the true 
Christian and left to his family and 
friends that priceless legacy of a 
well rounded life, a finished life, and 
an abundant entrance into the home 
of the redeemed. 

He was married in early life to 
Miss Belia Gillespie, of Iredell coun- 
ty; she died about thirty-five years 
ago. There are three children living 
of this marriage, Mrs. J. E. Stack, of 
Monroe; Mr. W. T. Nelson, of Tay- 
lorsville, and Mr. Maynardie Nelson, 
of Littleton. Twenty-eight years ago 
he was married to Miss Emma Ander- 
son, of Statesville, and she with three 
children survive: Mr. James A. Nel- 
son and Mr. Waldo Nelson of this city 
and Mrs. Carl T. Blakeney, of Jeffer- 
son, S. C. 

These words of the Psalmist apply 
in a peculiar manner to the life of 
this good man who has just passed 
away: "Mark the perfect man and 
behold the upright, for the end of 
that man is peace. — -Mamie Bays in 
Charlotte Observer. 



Prospect, Carmel Mar. 6 

North Monroe and Icemorlee, 

Center " 7-8 

Ansonvl'.le, Cedar Hill... " 13-14 

Wadesboro " 14-15 

Weddington, Weddirigton " 20-21 

Waxhaw, Bonds Grove " 27-28 

Plnevllle, Harrison April 3-4 

Calvary " 4-5 

Derila, Hickory Grove " 10-11 

Tryon Street " 18 

Mount Zion " 25-26 

Trinity May 2 

Chadwick • " 2-3 

Matthews " 15-16 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

W. R. Ware, P. E., Greensboro, N. C. 

Liberty, Liberty Jan. 3-4 

Greensboro, Spring Garden St., " 10 
East Greensboro, Holts Chapel, " 10-11 
Pleasant Garden, Rehobeth ... " 16-17 

Coleridge, Concord. " 23-24 

KamHeur & F'klinville, R'aeur, " 24-25 
Asheboro ct.. West Chapel ... " 30-31 

Asheboro station Jan. 31-Feb 1 

Randolph, Trinity " 6-7 

Wentworth, Salem " 13-14 

Reidsville ' " 14-15 

Uwharrie, Concord " 20-21 

Denton, Denton " 22 

Ruffin, Lowe's " 27-28 

Randleman and Naomi Mar. 6-7 



TO DRIVE OUT MALARIA AND BUILD 
UP THE SYSTEM. 

Take the Old Standard Grove's Taste- 
less Chill Tonic. You know what you are 
taking. The formula is plainly printed 
on every bottle, showing it is simply 
Quinine and Iron in a tasteless form, 
and the most effectual form. For grown 
people and children. 50c. 



WANTED. 



$2.50 

$1.25 ) Our Price 

100 f $1.65 



Quarterly <5%Ceetings. 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

D. Atkins, P. E., Asheville, N. C. 

Swannanoa, Swannanoa Jan. 2-3 

Burnsville, Burnsville " 9-10 

Hendersonv'e ct., Moore's G've, " 16-17 

Hendersonville " 17 

Central " 24 

North Asheville " 24 

Fairview, Tweeds " 30-31 

Marshall, Marshall Feb. 6-7 

hot Springs, Hot Springs " 13-14 

The district stewards will meet in Cen- 
tral church, Asheville, December 16th, 
at 11 a. m. 

FRANKLIN DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

R. M. Taylor, P. E., Franklin, N. C. 

Webster, Webster Jan. 2-3 

Murphy circuit, Tomotla " 9-10 

Andrews station " 10-11 

Franklin circuit. Oak Ridge ... " 16-17 

Robbinsville, Robbinsville " 23-24 

Hayesville, Oak Forest " 30-31 

Hiawassee circuit, Ranger.. ..Feb. 6-7 

Murphy station " 7-8 

Whittier, Whlttier " 13-14 

CHARLOTTE DISTRICT.— 2d Round. 

H. K. Boyer, P. E., Charlotte, N. C. 

Dilworth and Big Sripng Jan. 17 

Belmont Park " 24 

North Charlotte " 31 

Brevard Street 31 

Unionville, Grace chapel Feb. 6 

Monroe, Central ." 7-8 

Lilesville, Shiloh " 13-14 

Polkton, Hopewell " 20-21 

Morven, Union " 27-28 



MORGANTON DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

R. M. Hoyle, P. E., Marion, N. C. 
Thermal City, Thermal City Jan. 26, 190S 
Rutherfordton, Rutherfordlon, " 26-27 

Forest City, Forest City Jan. 2-3 

Henrietta and Caroleen, Caro- 

leen " 9-10 

Broad River at Kiestlers " 13-14 

Green River, Lebanon " 16-17 

Cliffside, Hopewell " 23-24 

Morganton station (at night).. " 29-31 
Morgan ton circuit, Glen Alpine, " 30-31 
Hartland ct., Mt. Pleasant ...Feb. 6-7 
Table Rock ct., Linville " 13-14 



Responsible man with horse and bug- 
gy in each community, salary $5.00 to 
$10.00 per day, to take orders from own- 
ers of Farms, Orchards, and Home Gar- 
dens. A splendid opportunity for far- 
mer's sons, also fruit tree and sewing 
machine agents, to make a business con- 
nection which will become more profita- 
ble each year. Address P. O. Box 670, 
Young's Island, S. C. 

WANTED. 

Reliable practicing physician to lo- 
cate at Swannanoa, N. C. Good field 
for good man. For information fur- 
ther, address, 

REV. M. T. SMATHERS, 
Or, DR. R. I. WILSON, 

Swannanoa, N. C. 

DO TOU RE/ID §S&? 

Woman's Home Companion $1 .25 ) Our Price 
McClures Magazine - - - 1.50 
Success Magazine - - - 1 .00 i 

Totalof Publisher price $3.75 
Woman's Home Companion 
Success Magazine - 

Carolina Magazine Subscription Agency, 
Send for cat. Box 295, Anderson, S. C. 



SALISBURY DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

J. C. Rowe, P. E., Salisbury, N. C. 

Lin wood, Cotton Grove Jan. 2-3 

Lexington 

Sa \fm 

Big Lick, Big Lick 

Cotton ville, Cedar Grove 

Norwood 

Bethel . 

Concord ct., Mt. Carmel 

Mt. Pleasant, Mt. Pleasant . . . 

Central 

Kannapolis, Bethpage 

China Grove, China Grove . . . 

Jackson Hill, Center 

New London, New London . . . 

Gold Hill, Gold Hill 

District Stewards will meet December 
16 and 17, at 2 o'clock, p. m., in First 
Methodist Church, in Salisbury. We 
hope to have Prof. W. R. Thompson at 
the meeting and have a leader's meeting 
of Laymen's Movement in connection 
with the district steward's meeting. The 
preachers are invited and it Is desired 
that every charge shall be represented. 
First Church will provide enter .ainment. 
Please notify Capt. W. B. Summersett, 
Salisbury, N. C, of your coming. 



3-4 
6 

7 

9-10 
10-11 
15 

16- 17 
18 

17- 18 
19 

19-20 
23 

24- 25 

25- 26 



SHELBY DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

C. F. Sherrill, P. E., Shelby, N..C. 
Lin coin ton circuit, High Shoals, Jan. 2-3 

Lincolnton station " 1-9 

Shelby ct., Patterson Springs, " 9-10 

Stanly Creek ",10-11 

Lowell, Ebenezer " 16-17 

McAdenville " 17-18 

Bessemer City " 23-24 

West End and Franklin Ave., " 23-24 

South Fork, Ebenezer " 30-31 

Lowesville, Hill's Chapel Feb. 6-7 

Mt. H^lly " 7-8 

Polkville, Rehobeth " 13-14 

Belwood, Palm Tree " 20-21 

STATESVILLE DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

J. N. Huggins, P. E., Statesville, N. C. 

Stony Point, Marvin .Jan. 2-3 

Alexander at Liberty " 3-4 

Caldwell, Hudson ... " 9-10 

Granite Falls " 10-11 

Lenoir ct., Zion " 16-17 

Lenoir station " 17-18 

Maiden, Lebanon " 23-24 

Rock Springs, Bethel " 24-25 

Catawba " 30-31 

Hickory ct.. West Hickory Feb. 6-7 

Hickory station " 7-8 

Newton " 13-14 

WAYNESVILLE D I ST R I CT.— 1 St Round. 

W. H. Willis, P. E., Waynesville, N. C. 

Bethel, Bethel Jan. 2-3 

North Haywood, Fines Creek. . " 16-17 

West Asheville " 23-24 

Leicester, Leicester " 30-31 

Haywood, Mt. Zion Feb. 6-7 

Brevard ct.. Greenwood " 13-14 

Brevard station " 14-15 

WINSTON DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

T. F. Marr, P. E., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Farniington, j. armington Jan. 2-3 

Thomasville " 10-11 

Forsyth " 16-17 

Grace " 17-18 

Summerfield, Lee's Chapel " 23-24 

Stokesdale, Stokesdale " 24-25 

Lewisville, Concord " 30-31 

Davidson, Good Hope Feb. 6-7 

Davie, Hardison " 13-14 

Mocksville " 14-16 

Cooleemee " - 14 

The district stewards will meet in the 
pastor's study of Centenary church, 
Winston, N. C., Tuesday, December 29, 
at 11:30 a. m. 



MT. AIRY DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

W. M. Bagby. P. E., Mt. Airy. N. C. 

Rural Hall, Trinity Jan. 2-3 

Mt. Airy ct., Zion " 9-10 

Mt. Airy station, Mt. Airy ... " 10-11 

Sparta, Sparta " 13-14 

Laurel Springs, Chestnut Hill, " 16-17 

Jefferson, Jefferson " 20-21 

Helton, Methodist Chapel " 23-24 

Creston, Big Laurel " 30-31 

Boone, Fairview Feb. 3-4 

Watauga, Valle Crucls " *-7 

Wilkes ct„ Union " W-ll 



'n Hilary 14. 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



The Cole Re-union. 

Will you please give me space in 
the Advocate to tell of the good time 
we all had at the uole re-union at 
McAdenville on Christmas day? We 
had been planning and praying for 
a good time and the Lord gave us a 
truly good time. Some of us met 
the day before and decorated the 
sehoolhouse and Friday morning they 
came from all directions, and by 12 
o'clock there were 74 present. The 
dinner was set and then we entered 
into a delightful service lasting about 
an hour, conducted by D. O. Kelly, of 
McRae, Ga. 

A great many took part in the ser- 
vice and the testimonies were very 
helpful. After the service closed the 
eight brothers and sisters sat down 
at one table, something we had never 
done before. TJiere were three 
brothers present, namely, J. M. Cole, 
Prosperity, N. C; J. J. Cole, Mount 
Holly, N. C; W. W. Cole, Charlotte, 
N. C. The sisters present were: 
Mrs. Elizabeth Barber, Lowell, N. C. ; 
Miss Alphia Cole, Belmont, N. C; 
Miss Francis Cole, McAdenville, N. 
C; Mrs. J. W. Browning, McAden- 
ville, N. C; Mrs.' R, L. Wagstaff, Mc- 
Adenville, N. C. Nephews present: 
JST. F. Cole, Durham, N. C; J. C. Cole, 
Danville, Va.; J. M. Cole, Jr., Fayette- 
ville, N. C. Nieces present: Mrs. 
Ada Bennett, Yorkville, S. C; Miss 
Daisy Moon, McAdenville, N. C; Mrs. 
Frank Clark, McAdenville, N. C; 
Mrs. J. W. Hamette, Lowell, N. C; 
Mrs. Monroe Mingus, Lowell, N. C; 
and Uncle Aaron E. Tillman and 
daughter and niece, of Asheboro, N. 
C-; Uncle E. B. Kelly, of Chauncy, 
Ga., and his three sons, J. M. Kelly, 
of Helenia, Ga., D. O. Kelly, of Mc- 
Rae, Ga., and W. H. Keliy, of Chaun- 
Cy, Ga., and a number of our relatives 
that we cannot mention. 



(A 




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m EARLY HEADERS 
f MONEY MAKERS 



Earliest Header. 
Fine, Me-hm Size. 
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About ten days 
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Earliest Flat 
Obbage A larpe 
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sh'ppi 



) THESE ARE THE KIND THAT MADE SOUTH 
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They need no introduction We guarantee FULL COUNT, safe delivery, and satisfaction or your MONEY REFUNDED. Send money with order, 
othet- fse Slants will be shipped C O. n. a-d you w.ll have to pav, return charges on the mo ey. thus adding to the cost of your plants. 
Prices f. o! B. Youngs Island: 500 1 or *1 00; 1.000 to 4.P00 at $1.50 per 1.0,0; 5,000 to 8,000 at $1.25 per 1,000; 9.000 to 20.000 at $1.00 per 1,000. Special 

\ prices on larger quantities. Prompt attention given all orders and inquiries. £ „ CjRSON. BOX 44. Young's Island, S. C. 

V Illustrated catalogue mailed free on application. **■ wi. v ""~"-"^' " ' ,? / 






The Standard Fertilizers of the South: 

TRADEMARK 



F. S. Royster 
Guano Co. 

Norfolk, Virginia. 




WHAT THE PAST YEAR HAS 
MEANT AND BROUGHT. 

A good many people are glad to 
bid goodbye to the old year. It has 
brought so much trial to them, it is 
a relief to see it close. To others it 
has brought joy, to some the realiza- 
tion of life's most cherished ambi- 
tions, to many the fruition of years 
of faithful effort. There, are others 
who are so grieved over the sins and 
follies of the past year, that they are 
glad it "is to <;lose and are grateful 
for the opportunity to make a new 
start. 

To , many it has been full of sick- 
ness and sorrow. Every day seemed 
only to bring, trouble and disappoint- 
ments. The nights were filled with 
torments of pain. How long to those 
aching bodies do such nights become 
— those nights when one lies awake 
and feels the laboring heart pumping 
wearily at its task and watches for 
the morning, not knowing whether 
it will ever dawn! They are nights 
of fear; for the thought of death 
grows strangely familiar when you 
have lived with it for a long time. 
Besides one grows to feel like a sol- 
dier who has been long standing un- 
der fire — any change would be a re- 
lief. 

But they are very heavy nights, 
and their heaviest burden is this, 
you must face the thought that your 
work in the world is almost ended, 
but you know . that it is not nearly 
finished. You have not solved the 
problems that perplexed you, you 
have not reached the goal that you 
aimed at, you have not accomplished 
the tasks that you set for- yourself. 
You are still on the way facing the 
thought that your journey may .end. 

The writer has had • some little 
taste of such experiences since she 
greeted you at the dawning of this 
year of grace, 1908. But my sister, 



my co-worker, I am sure you, like 
myself, would not change the year 
just dying, not even for the brightest 
days imaginatfon can picture. For 
as after the burning heat and rock- 
ing storms, the dying day lies beauti- 
ful in the tender glow of the even- 
ing, so days of sorrow, trial and pri- 
vation lose their weariness and lie 
bathed in a misty glory. The years 
that bring us many ills and that pass 
so stormfully over us bear away with 
the ugliness, the weariness, the pain 
that are theirs, but the beauty, the 
sweetness, the rest they leave un- 
touched, for these are eternal. As 
the mountains that near at hand 
stand jagged and scarred, in the far 
distance repose in their soft robes 
of purple haze, so the rough present 
fades into the past soft, and sweet 
and beautiful. 

During the year I have thought 
oftenest of you, dear comrades and 
co-oworkers, and should I set myself 
to recall pain or anxiety, I would be 
able to remember only your patience, 
gentleness and goodness, and the 
courage of those who have stood by 
upholding me, and of Him who said, 
"I will never leave thee, nor forsake 
thee." 

If the year 1908 had been spent by 
us all in such a way as to gain a 
place in those "everlasting habita- 
tions," then we can feel no sorrow 
as the softly pealing bells seem to 
say, "Ye shall not pass this way 
again." 




Making Improvements 
About the House?:-: 

THEN you will probably need 
some HARDWOOD MAN- 
TELS. TILES 44 GRATES. 
Be sure to write us for prices 
before you buy. 

jz? Catalogue Free^ 

If you mention this paper 

0DELL HARDWARE CO., 

GREENSBORO N. C. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY. 

N. B. — Following schedule figures pub- 
lished only as information, and are not 

guaranteed: 

10:18 p. m. — No. 38. daily. New York and 
New Orleans . Limited, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Pullman draw- 
ing room sleeping cars, observation, 
and club cars to New York. 
3:45 a. m.— No. 45. dally. Local for Char- 
lotte, connecting Tor Atlanta and 
points south. 
4:10 a. m. — No. 30. dally, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles sleep- 
er for New York. 

12:45 a. m.— No. 112. dally, for Raleigh 
and Goldshoro. This train handles 
Pullman sleeper from Greensboro to 
Raleigh. 



7:10 a. m. — No. 8," daily, for Danville 
and Richmond. 

8:15 a. m. — No. 237, daily, for Winston- 
Salem and daily except Sunday for 
Wilkesboro. 

7:50 a. m. — No. 154, daily except Sunday, 
for Ramseur. 

7:20 a. m. — No. 37, daily, Washington 
and Southwestern Limited. Pullman 
drawing room sleeping cars, observa- 
tion and -club cars New York to New 
Orleans. Pullman drawing room 
sleeping car New York to Atlanta. 
Solid Pullman train. Dining car ser- 
vice: 

7:50 a. m.— No. 11, daily for Charlotte 
and Atlanta, connecting for Asheville 
and Knoxville. 

9:25 a. m. — No. 44, daily, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles day 
coaches Atlanta to Washington. 

9:25 a. m. — No. 144, daily, for Durham, 
Raleigh and Goldslmro. 

1:15 p. m. — No. 36, daily, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles Pull- 
man drawing room sleeper New Or- 
leans to New York. Pullman drawing 
room sleeper Birmingham to Rich- 
mond, Va., and day coaches to Wash- 
ington. Dining car service. 
12:30 p. m. — No. 21, daily, for Salisbury 
and Asheville. Handles parlor car to 
Asheville. 

42:55 p. m. — No. 7, daily, local train for 
Charlotte. 

2:20 p. m. — No.' 207, daily except Sunday, 
for Winston-Salem, making connec- 
tions for Wilkesboro. 
12:50 p. m. — No. 130, daily, for Sanford 
and intermediate points. Through for 
Fayetteville and Wilmington. 

3:20 p. m. — No. 22. daily, for Durham, 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. Handles par- 
lor car to Goldsboro. 

2:30 p. m.— No. 151, daily except Sunday, 
for Madison. 

3:30 p. m. — No. 230, daily except Sunday, 
for Rams'-nr. 

4:55 p. m. — No. 131. dnily. for Mt. Airy. 

6:15 p. rri. — No. 35, dally, for Atlanta and 
points south. Pullman drawing room 



sleepers to New Orleans and Bir- 
mingham. Day coaches to New Or- 
leans. Dining car service. 
6:35 p. m. — No. 235, daily, for Winston- 
Salem. 

12:20 a. m. — No. 29, daily, for Columbia, 
Savannah and Jacksonville. Pullman 
drawing room sleeper and coach to 
Jacksonville. Dining car service. 

10:20 p. m. — No. 233, daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

9:35 p. m. — No. 12, daily, for Richmond 
and local points. Handles sleeper for 
Richmond. 

C. H. ACKF.RT. V. P. & Ci. M. 
S. H. HARriWICK, P. T, M. 
W. H. TAYLOE. G. P. A., 

Washington, D. C. 
R. L. VERNON. T. P. A.. 

Charlotte. N. C. 
R. H. DeBUTTR. P A> T. A., 




Home of Andrew Jackson, State Capitols, hunt- 
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interest, TEN in all, Fiw^E to persons who send 
Jno. F. Draughon, Nashviile, Tenn.. names and ad- 
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attend business college or take lessons By Mail. 

IF YOU want TO fCifrom the JDOLLAR-A-DAY 
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Gl'ART RIGHT by asking for FREE catalogue 

ORAUCHON'S 

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Washhgton, Rjki'h or Co umVa 

FOR SALE 

Cloth edition ofBurion H >lmes Lectures. (Xew) 
Adddess Rev. L. P. Bogle, Caroleen. N. C. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 14, 1 



MORPHINISM CURED 

No Experiment 



FREE TO YOU-MY SISTER 





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South Bend, Ind.. u. s. a. 



NO NEUTRAL TERRITORY. 
The fate of Absalom points a moral 
so clearly that he who runs may read. 
Are we in open reoellion against the 
King of Kings or listening to the hon- 
eyed woras of His enemies? If so, our 
overthrow is certain. Even if we are 
not with God, His Word declares, we 
are against Him. We cannot occupy 
neutral ground. We are called upon 
to choose whom we will serve. And 
if we enlist under the Lord's banner 
even though like David we may have 
.been unworthy servants, nothing can 
prevail against us. The battle for 
righteousness is on and will continue 
until the last enemy has been subdued. 
Shall we, heirs apparent to the king- 
dom, as was Absalom, incite rebellion 
and abandon our hope of inheritance 
by engaging in a losing contest or 
shall we serve the King with glad- 
ness? — Selected. 




KEEPING COVENANT. 
Promise-keeping is a necessary part 
of high character. The promise-break- 
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thought and fiim resolve. But once 
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sacred, and fulfill it to the letter. — 
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This Great World History, 

SENT TO YOUR HOME FREE 

Just send your name and address on the coupon below — that is all you need to do. It does 
not cost one penny and as- soon as your name and address is received a set of the world famous 
Library of Universal History will be sent to you prepaid. 



fJERE '* tne 8T reate8t opportunity ever offered — an oppor- 
tunity for our readers to secure at less than half price 
these fifteen beautiful volumes all printed from large new type, 
embellished with over 100 double page maps and plans, 700 full page 
illustrations, many of which are in colors, and over 5,000 pages of 
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This offer It made possible by the failure of the publishers, the 
Union Book Co. of Chicago. Hundreds of sets of this work have 
been sold at $60.00 each and they are worth every cent of it, but we 
now name you a rock-bottom bankrupt price of only 50c after ex- 
amination and $2.00 per month for 14 months. It is impossible to 
name a lower price for cash In full, as this is less than half the 
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lets quickly. 

Before you decide to buy we invite you to examine this work in 
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should you not want the books after examination we will have 
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No better set of books could be placed in the hands of children 
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NFVFR BEFORE In the annals of the publishing business 
* J-ilx. nave we seen suc ij a bargain. We do not hesitate 
to recommend this offer to every reader of this paper; indeed we 
believe every family should own a standard World History, for by 
knowing how other countries than ours are governed it gives us a 
better knowledge and higher appreciation of our own system of 
government and makes us better citizens. 

We will be glad to give you an opportunity to see for yourself 
and make your own decision after you have seen the beautiful 
binding, the magnicfient illustrations and have read parts of this 
great History of man on earth. Then y ou can decide. Should you 
not wish to keep the work you will notify us and we will have it 
returned at our expense. 

The illustration of the books given here does not do them justice ; 
you must see them to realize what they are. You assume no 
obligation to us or any one else by making this request, you 
simply ask for a free examination in your own home without 
paying any one anything, and remember you can 
send the books back at our expense, ai.d re- 
member, too, this bankrupt rock -bottom 
price of $28.50 for this $60.00 Library 
has been made possible only on ac- 
count of the failure of the Union 
Book Company, thus necessi- 
tating a receiver's sale at a 
price which barely cov- 
ers the cost or the pa- 
per and binding. 



MAIL THE 
C01P0N 





ChtManAtiuocate 



H. M. BLAIR, Editor. I 
W. L. SHERRILL, Assistant, i 



ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE OF THE M. E. CHURCH, SOUTH. 



191. SO PER ANNUM - 
( In Advance.^ 



ESTABLISHED 1855. 



GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY 21, 1909. 



VOL. LIV.-NO. .3 




THE CHANGES IN LIFE 



J 



VEEYTHING DIES, AND 
nothing dies. That is life's 
rlK" great nddle and God's riddle, 
>W and if you do not understand it 
you have everything to learn 
yet. 

There is decay and death in 
all things, and imperishable life in all things. 
God preaches a sermon to us on this text with 
the coming of every season, and it is but a 
sample of what he is teaching us every day. 
When autumn withers all the summer foli- 
age, scatters the damp, joyless leaves at your 
feet, and leaves nothing of all the past glory 
but heaps of refuse for the besom to clear and 
the wind to drive, you hear in every sound a 
sigh like this, "The things which are seen are 
temporal." But then you look further, and 
remember that this clearance of decayed stuff 
is only to prepare for a new suit of nature's 
clothing not many months hence. I hear men 
say that the autumn makes them sad. It 
breathes despondency in every breeze. It is 
like the melancholy prophet muttering, "All 
flesh is grass, and all the glory of man is as 
the flower of the field." And I suppose that 
there is for all of us a touch of depression in 
the autumn air, a little shiver of fear in the 
sight of its decaying splendor; yet why should 
it be so? Even there we hear the other voice, 
"But the things which are not seen are eter- 
nal." It is only the outside that perishes. 
The tree has life within itself which will break 
into joyous beauty again when the spring- 
time comes — the very flowers drop their seed 
and live again — nature only casts its garments 
and sleeps awhile, and awakes again, when 
morning comes, as strong and beautiful as 
ever. If you tell me that everything preaches 
of death, I answer yes, and everything preach- 
es of immortality — everything dies, and noth- 
ing dies. There is the great riddle again of 
which faith finds the solution in God, "The 
things which are seen are temporal ' ' ; but al- 
ways in the midst of the seen there is some- 
thing of the unseen which is eternal. Each 
human life reads the same lesson if we have 
only wisdom to receive it. We are always 
changing as we grow in years; yet there is 
something deeper in us which changes not. 



We leave everything behind, yet we carry a 
great deal with us. We bury everything that 
we had in childhood, yet the child survives in 
the man. We are different beings, altogether, 
and yet substantially the same. I meet a 
friend whom I have not seen for twenty years, 
and do not recognize him. I start with sur- 
prise when I hear his name. In build, com- 
plexion, outward appearance, he is another 
man. Then he speaks to me ; the tone of voice, 
the expression of the eyes, the grasp of the 
hand, bring back a thousand memories. He is 
just the man I knew. Everything is gone, yet 
enough remains. Darby and Joan are the same 
to each other as when they enjoyed their first 
stolen kiss in the moonlight. Young people 
smile at the thought. It is difficult to think 
of those two old people as lovers at the tryst- 
ing-place. Who would recognize the portraits 
which they exchanged in the sweet young 
days? So many trials and storms have worn 
those faces, so many worries and burdens 
have bowed their light and sprightly figures, 
so many experiences have given a new color 
and texture to their thought; and still they 
go on singing, "Always the same to your dear 
old Joan." Everything is changed, and yet 
there is no change. That is the sweet pathos 
of life. It is the eternal mystery — the unseen 
abides in every one of us. We are always dy- 
ing, yet behold we live! The immortal 
breathes through our mortal flesh, and God is 
always preaching resurrection and renewal to 
us through our very changes and decay. "The 
things which are seen are temporal, but the 
things which are unseen are eternal." 

You get the same lesson if you look at hu- 
man life on a larger scale. The fashions of 
the world change, and there is perpetual flux, 
waste and decay. Humanity puts on new gar- 
ments, takes up new thoughts, opinions, am- 
bitions, and desires, yet there is something 
everlasting which abides. We say that Jesus 
Christ is the same yesterday, today, and for- 
ever. It is the blessed assurance of otir faith ; 
but it is almost as true to say that man is the 
same yesterday, today, and forever. It is only 
the surface fashion and garments that pass 
away, the deeper life changes not. — J. D. 
Greenhough, in "The Divine Artist." 



2 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 21, 1909. 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 



Entered according to the Postal Laws and Regula- 
tions in the Post Office in Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year $1.50 

Six Months 75 

To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.00 a year. 

Office: 110 East Gaston Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

This paper will be continued to subscribers at 
the expiration of the time paid for unless, the office 
is notified to the contrary. Watch your label, and 
unless you intend to pay for the paper, do not allow 
it to be delivered to you over the time. If you wish 
your paper discontinued, notify us by postal card. 



EDITORIAL. 



We are printing in another column the address 
of the Executive Committee of the North Carolina 
Anti-Saloon League. This is important and we 
trust every reader will look it up and give it a 
careful reading. Mr. Clarence H. Poe, editor of 
the Progressive Farmer, is chairman of the com- 
mittee, and signs the paper as such. 

* » * * 

These beautiful, bright days give the preacher 
a fine opportunity for pastoral visiting and we 
feel sure the preachers of the Western North Car- 
olina Conference will make good use of the op- 
portunity. Coming in touch with the people in. 
their homes and praying with them does more to 
give the pastor a firmer hold upon them than all 
the big preaching in the world. Try it this year, 
and see if the preaching is not fresher and bet- 
ter also. 

* * * * 

The financial burden of the church is felt only 
by those who have no system, and who put off 
till the eno of the year what should be paid in 
si-iall installments during the year. Let our read- 
ers i f-gin now to test the matter of systematic 
paying, and see if we art not correct. Fifty cenrs 
a week will pay $26 during the year and will 
rcarcely be felt. Twenty-five cents per week will 
pay $13 for the year. The stewards will confer 
a great and lasting favor on the membership if 
they will insist on the systematic payment of 
church dues and it will relieve many a preacher 
of embarrassment. 

* * * ♦ 

In the New Year edition of the Southern Chris- 
tian Advocate, Dr. James H. Carlisle has a very 
fine article in which he lays great stress upon the 
importance of the religious paper and urges all 
heads of families to put such a publication in the 
reach of their children, and then he suggests that 
in many homes where no religious publication 
makes its weekly visits are boys and girls who, 
in the after years, will say our "parents were 
good to us; they fed and clothed and sheltered us, 
but they did not provide that religious information 
that would give us a knowledge of and love for 
the church." Will any parent who is liable to be 
thus reflectea on refuse to provide the church pa- 
per for the children? The cost is insignificant, 
and yet if the church paper is worth anything to 
a family it is worth infinitely more than the cost. 
We make the positive assertion that no family 
can be built up in intelligent loyalty to the church 
without the help which comes from reading the 
church paper. So eminent a saint as Dr. Carlisle 
out of love for those who need this help felt con- 
strained to urge the heads of families to place this 
means of grace in reach of their children. We 
trust his appeal may be heeded by that great mul- 
titude to which it applies. 



THE CONFERENCE JOURNAL. 

Advance copies of the Journal of the Western 
North Carolina Conference were sent out January 
9th. The last installment was shipped on the 18th. 
This is about one week later than they were de- 
livered last year, but it must not be forgotten 
that the Conference was held one week later. The 
Assistant Editor of the Advocate, being editor )i 
the Minutes, is too modest to speak of them in 
the praise that they deserve. The Senior is de- 
lighted to say that there is a concensus of opinion 
that this is the most attractive edition of tho 
Journal we have ever had. It shows the usual 
painstaking care of the editor, and the very n«at 
and attractive mechanical appearance will be a 



delight to all who are interested in our new Ad- 
vocate printing plant. Every item of work on 
this edition of the Minutes was done by the Chris- 
tian Advocate Publishing Co., and should be suffi- 
cient guarantee that we are able to take care of 
all work committed to us. We congratulate Brotn- 
er Sherrill and the Conference, and hope there may 
be ample appreciation of the faithful and efficient 
work of the Secretary; for it is no small task to 
do the work at conference and to edit and superin- 
tend the publication of the Journal and look 
after the distribution after conference. 



FEBRUARY ADVOCATE MONTH. 

There seems to be pretty general agreement 
that February shall be Advocate month. The cam- 
paign has been too long delayed already, but by 
diligent work our losses can easily be redeemed. 
If we reach our coveted goal of a circulation of 
ten thousand we must be up and doing. Our re- 
port in another eolumn shows that little has been 
done. May we not expect the next report to be 
much larger? Let every pastor push the canvass 
through the month of February. 



A STUDY IN STATISTICS. 

Upon examination of the Conference Minutes 
(just issued), we find that there are thirty pas- 
toral charges in our conference which pay to the 
pastors salaries ranging from $1,000.00 : to $2,200.- 
00, making the average salary in those strong 
charges $1,343.00. 

On the other hand there are 84 mission charges 
with a total membership of about 22,000. that pay 
salaries averaging $340.00, not- including the help 
secured from the mission board. When this rnis- 
sionary aid is added the average salary of the 
conference missionaries rises to $459.00, though 
many of them receive much less than that amount. 
In the 137 self-supporting charges of the confer- 
ence the average salary is $732.00, while the gen- 
eral average pay of the 221 pastors is $625.00. 

This statement of the facts should satisfy the 
most skeptical that the preachers are not in the 
work for the pay they get, and also that they are 
very practical and superior financiers, else they 
could not keep horses and buggies, wear good 
clothes, support large families 'and educate them 
on salaries far below what is demanded by coal 
heavers or bricklayers.. It is encouraging how- 
ever, to know that these figures show a marked 
improvement on former years. Our people are 
growing in the grace of liberality and are realiz- 
ing more and more the obligation not only to sup- 
port the ministry, but to provide liberally for the 
material comfort of the minister and his family. 
Many charges are generous in their allowances, 
but in some quarters there is yet wide room for 
growth. We hope this year that official boards 
will bestir themselves to instruct and develop the 
power that is yet latent and show the people who 
are blind to duty, the reasonableness of giving or 
paying. We believe that most congregations that 
seem to be miserly in their support of the church 
are really lacking in knowledge of obligation, but 
when these honest but misguided people are clear- 
ly shown the better way, they will not be slow to 
walk therein. 



LET THE FIRES BE KINDLED. 

The Advocate rejoices to hear of the showers of 
blessing that are already falling in some sections 
of the conference. During the past week at Car- 
away Memorial, White Oak, a suburb of our city, 
crowds have attended, and many souls have been 
quickened. At a single service on last Sunday, 
some twenty -five or more professed faith in Christ. 

Soul saving is the legitimate work of the church, 
and the curse of God will rest upon her wherever 
there is barrenness. No matter if some do fall 
away, it is our business to cast in the net and 
take such as come to hand. If we are -faithful, 
many whom we would class as of the unstable and 
unreliable class will prove to be among the very 
elect. We should never be deterred from aggres- 
sive evangelism because ofttimes what may seem 
the superficial are first to become interested, 
while apparently the more substantial are hard to 
reach. It has always been so. A few humble fish- 
ermen were Christ's first disciples. They had lit- 
tle or no standing among the people of their day 
who were doing things, yet to them was commi*> 
ted the work of planting the Christian church. The 
church would be stronger if it would cease to cod- 
dle and court the Captains and the Colonels and 
the Majors and the other would-be great ones of 
the co-nmunity and take hold of the simple-mind- 
ed ones — the plain, unassuming folks out of the 



ranks of whom Jesus chose his first followers. 

In some places the church has degenerated in- 
to a mere social club and the preacher is constant- 
ly between the upper and nether mill stone, in 
peril lest he should offend one of these big ones, 
and tortured with a consciousness of failure to 
preach a gospel that takes hold of the masses. 
Such a ministry is intolerable slavery, and we 
should pray the Lord to deliver us from it. Let 
us rather fear lest we should offend one of the 
little ones who, through a faithful and earnest min- 
istry might be brought into the joy of the saved. 

During these winter months, let the revival fires, 
be kindled. Let pastor and people unite in the 
earnest prayer that the fires may be kindled and 
that convicting power may come upon the people 
This is the best way, and, in fact, the only way 
to a place in the hearts of the people that will ena- 
ble the pastor to succeed in the best sense. This is 
the key that unlocks the treasury of material 
things and brings the offerings into the treasury 
of the Lord. Under the influence of revival power 
the ice-bergs that clog the stream of life and lib- 
erality will break away and all the economic prob- 
lems of the kingdom of God are solved. May the 
Lord kindle these fires everywhere throughout the 
Western North Corolina Conference, and may this 
be a year of great prosperity in our Zion. 



A QUESTION OF DISCIPLINE. 

In our editorial of last week headed, "Making 
Havoc Of the Membership," it seems that we 
touched a responsive chord. Quite a number have 
commended, besides those who have communi- 
cations in the issue of this week. While the 
question is up, it may be well for us' to answer 
two questions, (1) Who are meant by those who 
are lost sight of? (2) What should be done in 
the case of members who habitually absent them- 
selves from the place of public worship? The an- 
swer to these two questions will give the reader 
a clear distinction between the two classes re- 
ferred to. 

Those lost sight of are those who have removed 
from the bounds of a congregation, and, having 
failed to apply for a certificate, have located 
in a community unknown to anyone in the church. 
In other words, they are such as are really and 
truly lost sight of. Though they may have re- 
moved to a distant place, yet they may not be re- 
garded and dealt with as lost sight of unless their 
place of residence be unknown. In case of re- 
moval without certificate, if the address be known, 
it is plainly the duty of the pastor to notify the 
resident pastor and, if possible, secure the trans- 
fer. We should no more regard those who have re- 
moved to another place as having forfeited their 
membership than those who are in the communi- 
ty and yet absent themselves from the church. 
It is plain that very few people who have con- 
nected themselves with the church can ever fall 
into the list of those who are lost sight of, and ir 
is high time that we should call a halt on the part 
of any who are disposed to make havoc of our 
lists and dispose of the names of persons who 
need the tender shepherd's care rather than to 
be arbitrarily cut off. 

But what should be done with the members who 
habitually absent themselves from the church ser- 
vices, and who neglect or refuse to do anything 
for the support of the church? Our Book of Dis- 
cipline states very clearly what should be done 
in case of those who are disobedient to the oru>r 
and discipline of the church, and we have no hesi- 
tancy in stating that the offenders referred to he- 
long in this class. Let the pastor see them and 
admonish them. If they are cured, all is well and 
good. If not, let him take with him two or three 
faithful witnesses, and repeat the admonition. If 
this does not suffice to bring them around to a 
sense of their duty and privilege as church mem- 
bers let it be repeated. Then, if they are not cured 
let them be dealt with as in case of immorality. 
In almost every case we venture the assertion that 
the delinquents so much complained of would be 
reclaimed and restored to faithfulness, whereas 
the other process would place them where the 
church, can never hope to reach them again. The 
process of discipline outlined for us in our little 
book is nothing more nor less than the Scriptur-il 
method of dealing with the erring brother and is 
therefore always the best method. The object is 
to save and not to destroy. 

As we stated in our editorial of last week, the 
greatest weakness of the church of today is its 
failure to exercise saving discipline. Almost any 
one can exercise the power of excommunication. 
There is nothing easier than to hurl anathema* 



January 21, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



S 



at offenders and to read them out of the commun- 
ion, but it is the work of a godly, consecrated maa 
to go after such in the spirit of Christ, and re 
store them to a life of loyalty and obedience. In 
addition to the good that would come to the church 
by a process of discipline like this, we are confi- 
dent that nothing would help so much to bring 
upon the church the revival that all devout mem- 
bers so much desire and pray for. 

We have written thus at length on this subject, 
not to censure or find fault with the administra- 
tion of our brethren, but with the hope that the 
whole church may be brought to see the impor- 
tance of holding on to what we have as long as 
we may have hope of saving their souls. 



FACTS ABOUT THE METHODIST BENEVO- 
LENT ASSOCIATION. 

That we may do no injustice to the Association 
or any one connected with it by what is printed in 
the Advocate, we print herewith a letter from Re.'. 
J. H. Shumaker, secretary of the Association, writ- 
ten to Rev. A. D. Betts, in reply to a letter of in- 
quiry, as follows: 

Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 7, 1909. 
•Rev. A. D. Betts, Greensboro, N. C. 

Dear Brother: — Yours of the 5th to hand; in 
reply will say that the Association has but one 
salaried officer, and that he has received on an 
average about $600.00 a year. Our Treasurer is 
allowed a small commission for handling the 
funds, same amounting to something like $30.00 
a year, which would seem small compensation for 
the heavy responsibility incurred by him. 
Trusting this will be satisfactory, we are, 
Yours cordially, 

J. H. SHUMAKER, 

Secretary. 



NOTES AND PERSONALS. 



— Mr. George Montreville Sellars, a brother of 
Rev. J. H. Sellars, of Kannapolis, died at his home 
in Macon county on the 6th inst. He was 24 years 
old. 

— Rev. J. H. Brendall, of the Pilot Mountain cir 
cuit, writes encouragingly of the outlook on his 
charge. He and his family have had an unusually 
kind reception. 

— Dr. W. P. Ivey and his son, Vincent, are both at 
Dr. H. F. Long's Sanitarium at Statesville for 
treatment. They are progressing nicely and hope 
to be out in a few days. 

— Mr. John Allison Cline, an active member of 
Forest Hill church, Concord, and a steward, died 
last week. The funeral was conducted by his pas- 
tor, Rev. W. L. Hutchins. 

— At Wilkesboro last week Rev. J. P. Rodgers 
secured $450.00 in subscriptions for our orphan- 
age. One contributor being Mr. R. Don Laws, edi- 
tor of the Yellow Jacket, who gave $100.00. 

— Mrs. J. Ed. Cole, of Liberty, died at the Clegg 
Hotel in this city last Sunday afternoon. Mrs. 
Cole was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Reit- 
zell, of Liberty. She leaves a husband and three 
children. 

— On January 14th, at the home of her aunt, Mrs. 
Dr. W. H. Lilly, in Concord, Miss Mary Elizabeth 
Montgomery was married to Mr. Irvin H. Eldridge, 
of Greensboro, the ceremony being performed by 
Rev. T. W. Smith, assisted by Rev. P. T. Durham. 

— Rev. J. T. Stover began a series of sermons 
at Bethesda church last Sunday at 3 p. m., on 
the "Doctrines and polity of the Methodist 
church." Dr. J. C. Rowe, of Salisbury, preached 
an excellent sermon here Sunday night. The Doc- 
tor always has a good congregation. — Stanly En- 
terprise. 

— Rev. A. L. Stanford leaves Friday morning for 
Richmond to attend the Chapman-Alexander meet- 
ing in that city. The Methodist Sunday school 

now numbers 600, counting the First church and 
the West End church together, and 200 of the 
membership are men. Over 400 were present last 
Sunday. During the week the Sunday school 
rooms and the gallery have been newly carpeted. 

— We regret to learn of the serious illness of 
Capt. J. W. Todd, of Jefferson. A press dispatch 
dated January 16th says: "The condition of Capi. 
Joseph W. Todd, is no better, and unless there is 
a change soon he cannot live many days. He is 
expected to die at any time. At his own request 
he has been re-admitted into his old church, the 
Methodist, of which he was at one time an active 
member, having withdrawn himself of his own mo- 
tion years ago. His daughter, Mrs. W. M. Tran- 



sou, of Greensboro, arrived yesterday, and all his 
children were present when he was re-admitted 
into the church. 

A gentleman by the name of Wade died sudden- 
ly Tuesday night of last week at the Henry House 
in Statesville. He had been boarding there since 
last September, was apparently a man of exem- 
plary habits, but an entire stranger in the citv. 
He never received a letter during his stay. Fail- 
ing to find any relatives of the deceased man, his 
remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery 
Thursday afternoon. 

— Rev. W. O. Davis, the pastor, has been for a 
week engaged in a gracious meeting in the Cart- 
way Memorial church at White Oak, ably assisted 
by Rev. E. C. Glenn. At the service last Sunday 
morning a large crowd was present and some 25 
made profession of faith in Christ. It was good 
to be there for the service was very impressive and 
helpful to Christians and a great blessing to the 
young converts. Sunday night 27 were received 
into the church, and the meeting still continues. 

— The Randleman News of recent date makes 
a very complimentary reference to the opening of 
the work of the new year under the pastorate of 
Rev. G. E. Eaves. Referring to two sermons 
preached on a recent Sunday the editor says: "We 
are glad to note that both churces were well filled 
and that the speaker held his hearers in rapt -tt- 
tention. Our community is bound to be greatly 
helped by such sermons as Mr. Eaves is giviug 
us, and we urge our people to attend the churches 
so as to derive the full benefit of these services." 

— Rev. A. D. Betts, of the North Carolina Confer- 
ence, arrived in Greensboro last week accompan- 
ied by his wife and they will make their home with 
their son, Dr. J. S. Betts. We are glad to have 
this consecrated couple abide among us, and we 
trust that they may be given a warm welcome by 
Greensboro Methodists. Brother Betts has had 
a long and faithful career in the itinerant service 
and is now on the retired list, but, as always, is 
taking advantage of every opportunity to preacn 
the gospel, even by the wayside. 



AN ADDRESS TO THE PEOPLE. 

To the people of North Carolina: — 

There is a proper and not unnatural public in- 
terest as to present policy of the North Carolina 
Anti-Saloon League, and in response to this 
feeling, we have thought it advisable to issue the 
following public statement: 

Enforcing the Will of the People. 

By an overwhelming majority the people of 
North Carolina have declared for the suppression 
of the liquor traffic in this state. 

The State Anti-Saloon League stands simply 
for the enforcement of this expressed will of the 
voters of the state, and we appeal with confidence 
to the General Assembly elected by these voters 
to see that in no particular shall the verdict of 
last May be abated. 

We do not ask for more than the people have 
declared for, nor do we expect less. The people 
having so unmistakably declared their wishes, it 
becomes the duty of their law-makers to provide 
in all cases the proper legal machinery for enforc- 
ing their newly-expressed will, and for punishing 
all violations of the new statute. Seeing that the 
enforcement of the law is now in the hands of our 
own state officials, we call atteution to the fact 
that in most counties no compensation is now al- 
lowed sheriffs for breaking up illicit distilleries, 
and we earnestly ask for a general tax providing 
for the payment of $25 for each capture made by 
a sheriff, a policy which has worked successfully 
in Cumberland and other counties, and without 
which the machinery is manifestly inadequate. 
Beyond this we ask for nothing. 

Let's Make No Hole in the Dike. 

We do not believe that the whiskey interests 
can bring any strong pressure to bear upon our 
law-makers for any weakening of the present 
law, but we do not think it amiss to warn our 
people against agitation for seemingly innocent 
or unimportant amendments. To make one change 
will open up the whole subject afresh, and offer 
another much-coveted opportunity for the whis- 
key forces to spend money in an effort to corrupt 
public sentiment. We have seen indications, for 
example, of a plan to use the apple growers as 
cats' paws — the liquor interests insiduously en- 
deavoring to arouse a spirit of dissatisfaction 
among them in the hope of weakening the law 
for their own ultimate advantage. We warn our 
farmers against these schemes; we cannot afford 
to make a hole in the dike which might lead in 



the end to bringing down the whole flood of cor- 
ruption and intemperance again upon our homes. 

It is our belief that the people of the state, the 
Anti-Saloon League, and the General Assembly, 
are alike resolved upon what has become known 
as the "stand pat" policy. Let us have no hurt- 
ful agitation, and if it come, let the blame be upon 
the heads of the whiskey element. 

Duty of All Good Citizens is the Same. 

If they seek to violate the law, swift and sure 
punishment must be meted out to them. Upon 
this point we ask all good citizenes to be alert. 
It is the duty of every friend of temperance, of 
course, to see that our Prohibition Law is thor- 
oughly enforced, but it is not more the duty of 
the temperance man than of any other good citi- 
zen. It is now one of the state's statutes which 
every official and citizen is sworn to support, and 
whatever his original attitude may have been, it 
is as much the duty of every man to support the 
Prohibition Law as to support the laws against 
gambling, theft or arson. The same penalties 
provided by law for failure to enforce these last- 
named laws are also available in the matter of 
prohibition, and the duty of the citizen is the saiae 
in each case. Any negligent official should be 
promptly removed as provided by the statute. 

Good citizens everywhere should also let their 
city officials, sheriffs, deputies, and their solici- 
tors know that the better public sentiment of the 
community is behind law enforcement, and in 
such cases even a determined minority, acting 
with the law as a club, can secure the same thor- 
ough-going enforcement which is expected in 
strongly prohibition communities. 

Prohibition in Rebuilding the South. 

The moral argument for prohibition has been 
too often stressed to require further mention her;:; 
but we do not think it unwise to add that consid- 
erations of patriotism have been no less potent in 
bringing the people of North Carolina and the 
South to the new policy of state-wide prohibition. 

As a part of our progress in striving for indus- 
trial leadership, and because the first considera- 
tion here must be the development of a strong, 
efficient people, the South in the same spirit in 
which it resolved upon an educated citizenship, 
has also unalterably resolved upon a sober citi- 
zenship. And having put our hands to the plow, 
we appeal confidently to the patriotic men and wo- 
men of North Carolina to see to it that there shall 
be no looking backward. 

By order of the Executive Committee of the 
North Carolina Anti-Saloon League. 

CLARENCE H. POE, 
Chairman. 

Raleigh, N. C, Jan. 16, 1909. 



EVANGELISTIC MEETINGS, MOUNT AIRY 
DISTRICT. 

I will hold meetings beginning on the dates 
given below at the following places: 
Rural Hall, January 24. 
Sandy Ridge, February 14. 
Beulah, February 28. 

W. T. CARNER, 
District Evangelist. 



We do not understand the supreme, the unut- 
terable interest embraced in religion, when we 
think to give less to it than our whole heart. We 
do not understand our nature, when we think to 
shuffle off its stupendous charge. — Orville Dewey. 



"There is something wrong with a Christiaa s 
life if he never makes a sinner feel ashamed of 
himself." 



CAMPAIGN FOR NEW SUBSCRIBERS. 
Report to January 19th, 1909. 



ASHEVILLE DISTRICT. 

Riverside, A. E. Harrison . l 

% ■ Total l 

CHARLOTTE DISTRICT. 

Di worth, Rev. A. L. Coburn .... . 1 

Total : 1 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT. 

Coleridge circuit, R. L. Fruit 1 

Pleasant Gard n, R. A. Taylor 1 

Total 2 

MORGAMTON DISTRICT. 

Cliffside, S. E. Richardson . 2 

Total 2 

STATESVILLE DISTRICT. 

Lenoir circuit, Rev. J. o. Ervin 11 

Total . . 11 

WAYXESVTLLE DISTRICT. 

Waynesviile, Rev. J. H. Barnhardt 1 

Jonathan circuit * 9 

Total '• 10 

Grand Total 27 



4. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 21, 1909. 



Miscellany 

REVIVAL PREACHING — THE MAN AND THE 
MANNER. 



William Henry Meredith, S. T. D. 



We regard as the great prerequisite to true re- 
vival preaching a revival preacher. 

Assuming that every true preacher is godly and 
diligent in the discharge of his sacred calling; 
that he is a man of much more than average pi- 
ety; we also assume that there are times in such 
a preacher's life when all the graces of the Chris- 
tian life are not in peifect health, when all the 
fruit of the Spirit is not in a state of rapid growth. 

Because, though not of the world, he is still in 
it; because being human he is also comoassed with 
infirmity; because that by reason of his peculiar 
relation to the powers of darkness, he is exposed 
to the most subtle and fiery darts of the enemy, 
whose policy of war is to pick off the officers; 
from these, and other causes, there are times in 
the experience of most preachers when they are 
not so thoroughly alive to God themselves as to 
be fitted to undertake the work of revival preach- 
ing. The multitudinous duties of the modern pas- 
torate, also, many of which duties are wholly secu- 
lar, should be done by the laity of the church, un- 
fit many a devoted preacher for the work of re- 
vival preaching. Even when these secular mat- 
ters fall not upon the pastor, there is danger that 
in his work of preparing food for other souls he 
may allow his own soul to starve. He sometimes 
wakes up to this, and with the author of the 
Book of Canticles, says: "They made me the 
keeper of the vineyards; but mine own vineyard 
have I not kept," 

A preacher whose own piety is at a low ebb is 
in no condition to begin revival preaching, unless 
it be preaching to a congregation of one, and that 
one himself. 

A preacher's heart revived by self-examination, 
humiliation before God, confession to him, and 
whole consecration to his service; a heart brought 
into sympathy with the Christ who sacrificed him- 
self to save men; such a revived heart in the 
preacher is necessary to revival preaching. 

Such a heart is the fountain out of which may 
flow true revival preaching. 

* * * * 

Another prerequisite to revival preaching is a 
revived intellect in the preacher. 

If any man thinks that revival preaching and 
mental indolence go together, he is greatly mis- 
taken. Old sermons with which one is so familiar 
that if waked up in the middle of the night one 
could then stand on his head and repeat them, 
may possibly do for a few peripatetic evangelists 
who "go about" doing good, but for pastors, they 
would be useless in revival preaching. If ever 
a pastor needs to be intellectually active, if ever 
he needs to do hard thinking, as well as earnest 
praying, it is when seeking or conducting revivals 
of religion. His best thinking, his clearest judg- 
ment, his fullest realization of the truths of God 
are needed at such times and seasons. In his or- 
dinary work he may very occasionally practice 
impromptu thought and utterance before the peo- 
ple, and this to his and their profit, but unpre- 
pared preaching will not be true revival preaching. 

* * • • 

A revived body is no mean factor in this prob- 
lem. God has sometiems used weak and sickly 
preachers in carrying on revivals, and thus demon- 
strated his supernatural power. But health and 
vigor are catching. The preacher who comes be- 
fore the people with a revived body, all aglow with 
life and health, is at an immense advantage to 
himself and his people. 

It should be the preacher's care, especially dur- 
ing revival seasons, to keep his heart burning with 
love to God and to precious souls, his mind all 
a"ame with intellectual fire, and his body^all 
aglow with physical health and vigor. Such a 
luminary would be an ideal preacher; a living 
center, from whom will radiate light and love and 
power. 

The first of these requisites, a revived heart, is 
within the reach of every preacher; the second of 
them, a revived intellect, is also attainable by all; 
the third, a revived body, may be denied to many, 
but should be sought for by all who undertake 
revival preaching. 

* • • * * 

After this much about the man, what shall we 
say about the manner of revival preaching? 



Certainly the manner of the revival preacher 
should be fervent, warm-hearted. "Send us preach- 
ers with hot hearts," was the cry sent home from 
one of the mission fields. The heart of the revi- 
val preacher should be all aflame with the love 
of Jesus, and with love for the souls to whom he 
preaches. The word he preaches should be as a 
fire in his bones. He should be a burning as well 
as a shining light. 

If the old preacher had a shout in his heart, he 
let it out, even though it was like that of Stentor, 
whose shout was as the shout of fifty men. If 
he felt like weeping as he preached to the peo- 
ple, he wept, and was not ashamed of his tears. 

He thought that if prophets of the old dispen- 
sation, who had a so much poorer realization of 
the people's needs and dangers, could weep over 
them as did Jeremiah, saying, "O, that my head 
were waters, and mine eye a fountain of tears, 
that I might weep day and night over the slain 
of the daughter of my people." 

And a psalmist who wept and sang: "Rivers 
of water run down my eyes because they keep not 
thy law." 

Knowing his Bible the old preacher knew that 
Paul was not ashamed of his tears for men, but 
tells that "many walk of whom I have told you of- 
ten, and now tell you, even weeping, that they are 
the enemies of the Cross of Christ." 

Paul's ministry of three years at Ephesus was 
prosecuted, "day and night with tears." Thus he 
ceased not to warn them of their sin and danger. 
Paul told the Corinthians that his first letter to 
them was written with tears. If that intellectual 
giant, Paul, did not restrain tears for men, much 
less should we. 

* * * * 

Jesus was an emotional preacher. When he be- 
held the city, he ■ wept over it, saying, "If thou 
hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, 
the things which belong unto thy peace! but now 
they are hid from thine eyes." 

When we reach as high a plane of intellectual 
culture as Paul stood on, and when we occupy a 
higher moral and spiritual plane than that on 
which stood the only model preacher that time 
will be soon enough for us to begin to think of 
substituting a coldly intellectual utterance of 
truth, for fervent revival preaching, glowing with 
holy love, and moistened with sympathetic tears. 
Such preaching will be neither cold nor dry. 

We have been taught the art of preaching, and 
the art of teaching and the art of singing. These 
are good. We wish we had been more diligent 
learners of these noble arts, but what the world 
and the church most needs of us today is, more 
heart singing. Not more theology, but more 
"heart-ology," heart-teaching, and heart preaching. 
Speaking from the human side the salvation of 
this world depends very largely upon the heart 
power of the church, and especially the heart 
power of the preachers of the church. 

It was said of Robert South, "He dipped his pen 
in the center of his heart." Is it any wonder then 
that each generation calls for a new edition of his 
old sermons? 

Said an old Scotch woman of McCheyne: "He 
preached as if he was dyin' a'most to have ye con- 
verted." 

Said an intelligent hearer to us in criticism of 

her pastor: "Brother is very good, but if 

he cannot convert your coul he does n't want to 
have anything to do with you." 

It was, though not so intended, a glowing tes- 
timony to the intense spiritual earnestness of 
that preacher. No wonder he has a revival on 
every charge he serves. No wonder he is now pas- 
tor of one of the largest churches of our denomi- 
nation, and is one of our most successful soul- 
winners. 

* * * * 

On the vital relation of the Holy Spirit to all 
true preaching we are all agreed, and believe that 
what steam is to the locomotive; what water is 
to the waterwheel; what the living spark is to 
the dead cannon, dead ball, and dead powder; 
what life is to the body; all this, and more, too, 
is the Holy spirit to all revival preaching. 

Therefore, if we would be revival preachers, let 
us do as do electricians, who go down to the deli- 
cate work of adjusting magnetic needles. They 
strip themselves of every shred of metal, even to 
the last metal button upon their clothing, so that 
the electric currents shall not be deflected. If we 
preachers would have a revival on every charge, 
let us remove all impediment, and get down to 
the most delicate of all work, that of adjusting 
immortal souls to their right relations to the 



Christ who died, and to the Holy Spirit who waits 
to regenerate and sanctify them. May the Holy 
Ghost make all preachers revival preachers. — 
Northwestern Christian Advocate. 



PERSONAL WORK IN THE REVIVAL. 



Edward B. Crawford, D. D. 



The present call to the church is to personal 
work. This is the keynote of present-day evangel- 
ism. It is the key to unfailing success. No meth- 
od is more certain of results. The hand of God is 
surely in the movement to arouse the church to 
undertake this form of work. Experience and ob- 
servation testify to the importance and effective- 
ness of this method. The wonder is that anyone 
should question its supreme place in evangelistic 
work, or fail to respond to its imperative call. The 
most important question before the church of mod- 
ern times is how to reach the masses for Christ? 
But a small proportion of these attend the ser- 
vices of the church, or are brought under any di- 
rect religious agencies. There are unnumbered 
multitudes who are entirely untouched by present 
methods of Christian or Church work. How to 
reach these, for whom the Christ died, is the most 
difficult and pressing problem facing the church of 
today. Those who attend evangelistic services 
are almost exclusively church members. The 
people desired do not come. An invitation will 
bring but few. The writer was in a special evan- 
gelistic service not long ago. The meeting was in 
charge of an earnest and Godly man. Less than 
a hundred people were present. The sermon was 
impressive, and an unusually earnest appeal was 
made to the unconverted, yet there was no re- 
sponse. There were no unconverted persons pres- 
ent, and the announcement was made that the 
meetings would close with the end of the week. 
There was no material to work upon. The un- 
saved masses, however, surged past the door of 
that church untouched and unmoved. 

Then, too, present-day evangelism is too costly 
for the average community and church. Modern 
evangelism is increasingly costly. It is well-nigh 
impossible for a single church to escure an evan- 
gelist of an reputation, owing to the large ex- 
pense. A short time ago the writer served on a 
committee to devise ways and means by which a 
certain evangelist could be brought to Chicago. 
The lowest estimate of expense was $50,000. That 
sum was too large a burden for the committee to 
carry, and the plan was finally abandoned. The 
church must pursue a different course if the 
masses are to be reached. May it not be a better 
course? Moody answered the question, How to 
reach the masses? in three words. They were, 
"Go for them." We must go where people are. 
If the unsaved will not come to the services of 
the church, then the church must carry the gospel 
to the people. The commission of Christ, "Go — 
and preach the gospel to every creature." There 
is no surer way of reaching the people than by 
going after them. Some one says, "Let us make 
a house-to-house visitation of our community, and 
take a religious census of the people." That is 
an important movement, but it is only a start. It 
is discovering the field and getting ready for work, 
but it is not working the field. One should know 
his field, but it is only important as he proceeds 
to cultivate it. The important thing is to work 
the field. Every unsaved person in the commun- 
ity should be visited, and urged, not only to at- 
tend the evangelistic service, but to become a 
Christian. 

The entire church membership should engage 
in this kind of work. Such work, on the part of 
the entire church membership, would thrill all 
the church services and make them dynamic. 
"They went everywhere preaching the Word." 
That is what made the "Acts of the Apostles" pos- 
sible. While engaged in this kind of work one 
man said to the writer, "I have lived on this cor- 
ner for five years, and you are the first man to 
invite me to church in that time." This man was 
the son of a Methodist preacher and a university 
graduate. Another said, "I have lived in Chicago 
for six years without aarkening the door of a 
church." This man was also the son of a Metho- 
dist preacher. Both these men were won by per- 
sonal work. What we need is walking evangel- 
ists, who will go from house to house with loving 
words, to turn the people away from sin, and lead 
them to Calvary's cross. 

This is the effective method. The pathway from 
God to a human heart is often through a human 
heart. Reaching a man must often be through 



January 21, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



5 



face-to-face pleading. There is power in personal 
appeal. This method succeeds where others fail. 
One can hang on till he lands his man. Let the 
church get a hunger for souls, and the baptism of 
Pentecost, and then go out after the unsaved of 
the community, and the coming year will be mark- 
ed by a gracious outpouring of the Spirit, and a 
large ingathering of men and women reached 
through personal work. Then shall the church 
rejoice when they divide the spoil. "-"—Northwest- 
ern Christian Advocate. 



COMPELLING POWER OF THE GOSPEL. 



Leon L. Hammitt, B. D. 



How shall Christian truth command men? 

Its power evidently does not depend upon its 
perfect presentation. The ministry of Jesus il- 
lustrates this. He presented his love, providence, 
crucifixion, death, and resurrection. All the great 
Christian truths which we believe, teach and 
preach were set forth by him in the richness of 
perfection. But, notwithstanding the multitude 
heard him gladly, they refused to admit his au- 
thority. Those who did accept him found a de- 
lightful experience. It was one of culture, peace, 
assurance, trust, and confident dependence. It 
was typical of the spiritual atmosphere of many 
modern churches. When Jesus sought to bring 
those who leaned upon his bosom to offer their 
own for the world to lean upon, he proved that 
they lacked endurance. He said: "It is expedi- 
ent for you that I go away." Immediately they 
went away to their fishing, and left the church to 
languish. This is sufficient to illustrate that the 
authority of the gospel does not depend alone up- 
on its perfect presentation. 

What, then, is the method of its power? 

Jesus Christ said it must have been a helper, 
and that he would send one to us. Christ as 
Christian truth associates himself with the crea- 
tive spirit of God, who "speaks and it is done." 
From the beginning, the Spirit has been engaged 
in his creative purpose. He strives with man to 
lead him to a recognition of that goal. Christ pre- 
sents himself as the Spirit with that creative pur- 
pose realized. To know him is to realize the per- 
fection of the Spirit's design in us. It is the bap- 
tism of the Holy Spirit. Wherever Christ is in- 
troduced he does not impress men with his power 
until they recognize that he is the fulfillment of 
the Spirit of God, who strives with them. 

When he enters their consciousness as such an 
one, he becomes glorified and beautiful as the 
morning. With the crown upon his head and the 
scepter in his hand, he takes his place at the right 
hand of the glory of God as the creativ* spirit 
moves out upon the deep. Here we see him as our 
Savior and the way home, the wisdom of God to 
the Greek, the Messiah to the Jew, and all things 
to all men. Men who are determined, willful, sel- 
fish and who refuse to be governed find here their 
Master, and become tender and obedient. Wit- 
ness Paul in a terrific struggle. A Voice is say- 
ing: "It is hard for thee to kick against the 
goads." Paul replies: "What wilt Thou have me 
to do?" Here Christ appears in judgment, and 
men are convicted of sin and of righteousness. 
Here men see they must accept him or prove 
themselves false to the truth and wisdom of tueir 
age, and become crucifiers and murderers of man's 
future greatness and glory, outlaws in God's uni- 
verse, and, like Judas, in their own eyes worthy 
only to be hanged. Here Christ becomes a com- 
manding necessity. 

Surely, the Christian message in our day is not 
sweeping the multitudes into line as it did at 
Pentecost, or in the Reformation, and in Wesley's 
day. Why not? The men of today hold up Christ 
just as plainly in the sight of the multitude. Cer- 
tainly, the Spirit still strives with men. Perhaps 
we have not heard the Spirit's invitation to men 
in our day and associated the message of the 
church therewith. The Spirit and the bride should 
together say, "Come." In the first century, when 
the Spirit led men to seek for the certainty of a 
future life, the resurrection of Jesus was preached 
with compelling power. In the Reformation, when 
the Spirit led men to seek access to God, the re- 
formers preached Christ and faith alone as the 
way to him. In Wesley's day, when the Spirit 
led men to seek for experimental religion, they 
found it by entering the Christ life; so the com- 
pelling message was Christ and Christian perfec- 
tion. 

In each age Christ has been the necessary an- 
swer to man's quest. Just now, as at the Advent, 



the world is looking for a man. Man is not prov- 
ing strong enough to fill the great positions of 
trust incident to further progress. The Spirit is 
leading us to seek for such an one. Is not the 
object of our quest the Christ who refused the cit- 
ies' wealth in order that he might serve humanity. 
Is not he the absolute necessity, and will not men 
be compelled to seek him in order to preserve 
home, life and land? This is only a suggestion 
concerning Christ's compelling power in an hour 
when the multitude are not consciously taking or- 
ders from him. One thing is certain, however; 
if men are to be compelled by him, we must find 
in our need the Spirit's power and open the way 
for Christ to associate himself therewith, and thus 
crowned with spiritual grace. — Northwestern 
Christian Advocate. 



"REV.," "BRO." DR.," AND "MR." 



Rev. J. Hastie Odgers. 



We are all agreed surely that a good form either 
in worship, address, or style of writing is worth 
while. Mere trifles, it has been said, often have an 
important bearing upon life. Certainly the careful 
observance of them gives tone to an individual, 
a business or a church. In the last decade several 
changes have been going on within church circles 
as to the titles to be employed. 

First is that use of the word, Reverend. It is no 
longer "The Reverend John Wesley." It is not 
even "Rev. John Wesley." But it is too often 'Rev. 
Wesley." Even preachers have been known to an- 
nounce that "Rev. Smith will preach next Sunday." 
And "Reverend," with an occasional "Rev." is the 
term now with which the average preacher is greet- 
ed about town. You cannot order a pail of oil, or 
a pound of nails, but you will find written thereon 
for delivery, "Rev. Brown." It all sounds so fit- 
ting. Far better write, "For Brown, 210 Main 
Street." 

Again, think how the word "Doctor" has been 
overworked. I am not sure but that the people are 
greatly confused in regard to its use. Some seem 
to think that every minister is a doctor; others 
that everyone who has a position of a little promi- 
nence should be called doctor. Of course, if we 
use that word in its original sense, teacher, in the 
same way it was used of our Lord, the Great Teach- 
er, how fine it would be! But when the use of the 
word presupposes that the man thus signfied has 
received a doctor's degree from some accredited — 
and we rest hard on the word accredited — institu- 
tion, the matter is positively embarrassing. 

Then there is the word Brother; or its equiva- 
lent, Sister, as the case may be. Brother is fre- 
quently abbreviated to "Bro." Sister has not yet 
come to that undignified abbreviation. We are 
glad that the staid women of our churches are not 
yet addressed as "Dear Sis." Now there can be 
no doubt that there are times when the old terms, 
brother, sister, have a sound that warms the heart; 
but as a general and andeviating term, we suggest 
that it be allowed to die. 

The writer well remembers when a certain youth- 
ful minister addressed a youthful bride of a certain 
other minister with the effusive title of "My dear 
sister," which under the circumstances provoked 
a quiet smile. Grant that there are times when 
the word reaches the spot, and that among old peo- 
ple it has a delightful sound, yet since almost ev- 
ery society and lodge in America has adopted the 
word, and thereby it has lost its distinctiveness, 
let us eschew it or keep it for state occasions only. 
To most people it is to be hoped the American ti- 
tles of Mr. and Mrs. will appear sufficiently gentle, 
respectful and fraternal. 

As to the name by which church people should 
address their preacher, why not have some agree- 
ment? If there be those who must call one person 
the "milkman", another the "butcher," and another 
the "candlestick maker man", and if they want a 
"preacherman" in their vocabulary, we suggest that 
they say "pastor"; and we suggest that their pas- 
tor call himself the "minister" of his people. 
There is a reason for the use of each one of these 
words in the exact manner here set forth. 

The term pastor indicates that the people regard 
him in the find relationship, that of the pastor or 
shepherd; while the term "minister" reminds the 
people that their "pastor" thinks of himself as 
did his Master, as one who serves. 

For my part I like a title, honorably won and 
fittingly used. But I do not therefore enjoy seeing 
it plastered upon every box of books, or other pos- 
session of the man who wears it. It is not good taste 
to see it attched to every signature of his name. 



•Let us vote with those who say we will use the 
word "Reverend" only when it is preceded by the 
definite article and followed by the initials, or at 
least by the conventional "Mr." It would be well 
if some men would drop a little of their sensitive- 
ness on this point, and feel sufficiently honored 
when others, not sure of their proper degree, could 
feel that there was no impropriety in saying Mr. 
The title of "doctor" can only be redeemed from 
the low estate into which it has fallen when its 
use shall be confined to those who are in truth 
doctors, and who have received it from some wor- 
thy institution. 

Methodism, which aims to be genuine and hearty 
over all, will do herself no harm if she would set 
about to thoroughly educate her people in some of 
these things. There is such a thing as good tone 
and it does not hurt anything, even a church, to 
aspire to it. Titles are only trifles, to be sure, and 
yet we have lived all too long not to know the 
old story, "For want of a nail," etc. — From the 
"Mandell Methodist Episcopal Advocate." 



Be sure to take thy soul at the best Do not 
always consider what is the worst in thee and go 
no further. Do not only see thy failings and in- 
firmities, on the one side that accuse thee; but 
see if there be any soundness and uprightness, 
any goodness and truth of heart, that may speak 
for thee. Hear both sides. It is injustice to hear 
one side and determine the cause thereby. As 
the Lord deals with his servants, so shouldst thou 
deal with thyself. — Thomas Hooker. 



There is nothing so revolutionary, because 
there is nothing so unnatural and convulsive to 
society, as the strain to keep these things fixed, 
when all the world is by the law of its creation 
in eternal progress; and the cause of all the evils 
in the world may be traced to that natural but 
most dealy error of human indolence and corrup- 
tion, that our business is to preserve and not im- 
prove. — Dr. Thomas Arnold. 



Life has no zest when it has no realization of 
the unattained. The man who knows all, who 
has all, and who is entirely self-sufficient, has 
never had the satisfaction of coming into ideal 
possession of the splendor of the Infinite: he has 
of the Infinite never reached out and taken hold 
of the beyond. Let us praise God for the unmeas- 
ured and unattained. — Churchman. 



The effort to do right does not necessarily lead 
to the happy, spontaneous and loving practice of 
goodness. This is to be found not in the law, but 
in the gospel; not in the sight of duty, but in the 
sight of love. It is affectionate, filial gratitude 
for unbought, unearned mercy. It is the great 
love of him who has been forgiven much. — James 
Freeman Clarke. 



There is an idea abroad among moral people 
that they should make their neighbors good. One 
person I have to make good — myself; but my duty 
to my neighbor is much more nearly expressed 
by saying that I have to make him happy, if I 
may. — Robert Louis Stevenson. 



"Do not look forward to the changes and 
chances of this life in fear; rather look to them 
with full hope that, as they arise, God whose you 
are, will deliver you out of them. He has kept 
you hitherto— do you but hold fast to his hand, and 
he will lead you safely through all things. — Fran- 
cis de Sales. 



PREACHER'S STATIONERY. 
We have in our Job Department a special line of 
stationery to meet the wants of our preachers. We 
can fix up a pastor with 1,000 nice letter-heads and 
1,000 envelops, including 500 nice visiting cards, for 
$5.50, delivered at the nearest express office. This 
is a neat job, good enough for any preacher's desk. 
The same package without the visiting cards for 
$4.50. 

A package of 500 letter-heads, and 500 envelops, 
including 300 visiting cards, for $3.50. The same 
package without the visiting cards, $3.00, delivered 
at your nearest express office. 

We can furnish good Collection Envelops, «uch 
as all churches should use at $1.50 per thousand. 
In lots of 5,000 or more, $1.25 prepaid. 

Let us have your orders for anything In the Job 
Printing line. 

CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE PUB. CO., 
Greensboro, N. C. 



e 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 21, 1909. 



From The Field. 



Notice. 

Rev. V. E. Edwards has been rip- 
pointed pastor of Liberty circuit in 
place of Rev. W. L. Grissom, whoso 
ill health prevented his going there. 

W. R. WARE, P. E. 



East Eend. 

We have just closed a gracious re- 
vival meeting at Jonesville, N. C. It 
lasted seventeen days and resulted 
in thirteen professions of faith. The 
church was greatly revived and quick- 
ened. 

We are no v in a series of meetings 
at ^ast Bend, N. C, which we hope 
and pray will result in great good. 
Brethren,, pray to this end', that the 
Lord will come in power in our midst. 

W. T. CARNER, 
District Evangelist. 



Weddington Circuit. 

I trust you can give me space iu 
the Advocate to say " a few things 
about Weddington charge. -After 
four very plea ant years at Derira, 
and the unbounded kindness of the 
people there, we thought it would 
take a long time to feel at home 
anywhere else, but when we arrived 
here on the 9th of December, the 
people of Weddington gave us such 
a hearty reception that we felt at 
once that they were "our people." 

I can never cease to appreciate the 
loyalty of- the people of the Derita 
circuit. I was not able to do any 
work after the fourth Sunday in Sep- 
tember, yet the collections were all 
paid in full, and fifty dollars surplus 
on the salary. Through the kindness 
of Brother Siler and the Charlotte 
preachers all my appointments were 
filled. Brother Boyer has been with 
us and preached an excellent sermoa. 
and inspired the brethren with con- 
fidence in his leadership. 

Weddington is "beautiful for situa- 
tion." We have an excellent parson- 
age, with which we are greatly pleas- 
ed. Our school, with Rev. J. M. Dow- 
num and his assistants in charge, is 
doing excellent work. 

We are expecting a pleasant and 
profitable year. 

J. H. BRADLEY. 



EIk Park Charge. 

After serving the Jonathan charge 
for four years, according to the .rules 
of our church, we had to leave those 
very dear friends who were so ex- 
ceedingly kind to us during all that 
time. We left them reluctantly and 
would most gladly have returned 
again. But truly the Lord has again 
led us into green pastures of lo"e 
and kindness. 

We arrived here December 3d, and 
have been to all of our appointment. 
Have been royally received and, 
though a stranger, we have been 
most abundantly remembered during 
the holidays. Truly this people 
kno.v how to make their preacher 
feel as if he is appreciated. And if 
a preacher would not strive to do 
his best here and then a little better, 
after all the encouragement he re- 
ceives, he does not deserve a place 
am:ng zo royal a people. 

We would be glad, Mr. Editor, to 
see cither you or the Assistant at 
cny time, and would show you one of 
the mo^t faithful little ocks any- 
where. 

We will try to get up our allott- 
rrent of subscribers. 

Pray for us that our best may be 
given to this people this year. 

C. E. STEDMAN. 

December 29, 1908. 



Burnsville. 

On the fourth of December we ar- 
rived here. We were warmly received 
The following Sunday morning we 
were greeted by a large congregation 
here at Burnsville. It was the most 
intelliget and cultured audience I 
ever had the honor of preaching to. 
I have preached at all of the appoint- 
ments. Nine in all. I find good con- 
gregations — above the average in eda- 
cation and politeness. We are en- 
couraged at the prospects. This- is 
a great field. The fle'd is alreaiy 
white unto harvest! 

Our first quarterly conference was 
held the 9-10th inst. We had a fine 
conference. Dr. Atkins preached 
three of the most thoughtful, scholar- 
ly and powerful sermons we ever 
h jard. Our souls were set on fire. 
It v, as good to hear and to be there. 

We are now in a meeting here at 
Burncville and ask the Advocate, the 
brethren of the conference, and all 
ho read these lines to join us in 
prayer for a mighty revival of relig- 
cn in Zion and an ingathering of 
souls. This is a united effort of all 
the churches here. 

I find two fine high schools here, 
one by the Baptist church and one by 
the Presbyterians. There are now 
four hundred pupils here in school. 
Fraternally yours, 

C. E. HYPES. 



Wise and Timely. 

I write to endorse, and if possible, 
emphasize, your editorial in the Ad- 
vocate of January 14th, "Making 
Havoc of the Membership." It would 
be well for us all of us to file this arti- 
cle for frequent reference and medi- 
tation. Don't let us be too ready to 
unload. Ours is a great church and 
it can well afford to spend some of 
its strength carrying those who have 
not yet acquired strength and disci- 
pline sufficient to carry themselves. 
Our Lord said, "Peed my lambs," 
"Feed my sheep." If some of the 
diseased and crippled and straggling 
ones had more pastoral care they 
would soon become healthy and 
strong, and in full activity with the 
rest of the fold. Could not all of us 
be more diligent in looking up the 
straggling and the lost instead of be- 
ing ready to "cut them off?" It >s 
painful sometimes to note in some of 
our reports to conference that more 
members have been lost by revision 
of the church roll than have been add- 
ed by every means available during 
the year. 

Your article is a wise and timely 
one and has in it the true spirit of 
the great Shepherd of the church. T 
trust it will cause us all to be more 
thoughtful and careful in the disposi- 
tion we make of the membership of 
our churches. "He that winneth 
souls is wise," and he that keepeth 
them won is wise also. 

W. R. WARE. 



Missionary Interests on Shelby Dis- 
trict. 

I find only one Home Mission So- 
ciety on the Shelby district — at Gas- 
tonia. This is one of the great organ- 
izations of our church. I have never 
known a band of women to get into 
the work of this society without lov- 
ing it. Every station on this district 
ought to have one. Our district sec- 
retary is Mrs. R. J. Sifford, whose 
heart is in the work. 

The conference treasurer of the W. 
F. M. Society is Mrs. R. L. Swan, and 
the district Secretary is Mrs. B. JT. 
Morris. We have societies at Shelby, 
Gastonia, King s Mountain, Lincoin- 



ton, Mt. Holly, Cherryville, Lowell, 
Kadish, Palm Tree and Moore's Chap- 
el. 

I want these good women to know 
that I am in love with this work, and 
to feel free to call on me for any ser- 
vice. These missionary societies will 
help any pastor and any church. 

We have the Light Bearers at Shel- 
by, Gastonia, King's Mountain, and 
Cherryville. We have the Young 
People's Society at Gastonia and Ka- 
dish. 

The Discipline requires every Sun- 
day school to be a missionary school. 
No extra organization is required, it 
is only necessary for the pastor aud 
superintendent to set aside the collec- 
tion of one Sunday in each month for 
missions. Our great church requires 
this, and we must be loyal Metho- 
dists. Besides, it is oft-repeated his- 
tory that the Sunday school that 
gives the collection of one Sunday to 
missions will raise more in three 
Sundays for literature than the Sup- 
day school that doesn't give to mis- 
sions. The test has been made in a 
thousand cases. It is the law of our 
great church to give the collection of 
one Sunday in each month to mis- 
sions. Let every pastor and superin- 
tendent see that this is done. 

The Shelby district supports two 
missionaries. The pastor at Mam 
Street, Gastonia, had not been on the 
ground three weeks before he had 
amply secured subscriptions to con- 
tinue the missionary in the foreign 
field. The Shelby Sunday school sap- 
ports a missionary. It is wonderful 
the work this Sunday school is do- 
ing. 

Of course no pastor will set before 
him a task less than that of raising 
the collections in full. Honor is at 
stake. So is the enlargement of 
Christ's kingdom. The money is sore-* 
ly needed for the extension of the 
Lord's work. Shelby district has 
probably more cotton mills than any 
other district in the world. In other 
respects it is the banner district, and 
we want no painful black spot on our 
map. I hope all our missionary col- 
lections will be in hand by district 
conference. 

C. F. SHERRIfcL. 



close touch with the church is to get 
them to keep their membership in 
the church where they can attend, 
most regularly. This being true, I 
think v/e should not insist on per- 
sons leaving their membership in one 
place when they are living in anoth- 
er. R. M. COURTNEY. 



A Word of Endorsement. 

I want to say Amen to your edi- 
torial on "Making Havoc of the Mem- 
bership," contained in the Advocate 
for January 14th. You have lifted 
your voice against a dangerous ten- 
dency. I for one have felt for some- 
time that the average person does 
not properly appreciate the privilege 
and responsibility of church member- 
ship. And this lack of appreciation 
is in part, at least, due to the fact 
that often names are dropped from 
the roll as "lost sight of," when they 
are not lost sight of in reality. Not 
only does this course make the per- 
sons whose names are thus lightly 
removed feel that church member- 
ship is a matter of little importance, 
but the entire membership of the 
church is affected by this careless 
dealing with a sacred thing. 

And while I am writing may I add 
a few words about church certifi- 
cates? We have in the bounds of our 
conference many people who are 
moving from place to place. Especi- 
ally is this true of the population ;>f 
our mill towns. Hundreds of these 
persons are being lost to the church 
every year because their membership 
is left at the church from which they 
have moved. - And not only are 
they being lost to the churcsh, but 
these persons are losing the blessings 
and help that would come to them 
were they in vital touch with the 
church. My observation has been 
that the only way to keep people in 



Rev. J. M. Terrell, and His Work in 

the Greensboro District. 

Brother Terrell is now at work in 
our district and fortunate is that peo- 
ple who have him with them. He Is 
giving missionary information and 
stirring up enthusiasm wherever he 
goes. That pastor -is wise who gets 
all his people to hear this successful 
missionary fresh from the field. The 
entire church life should be quicken- 
ed and all the missionary organiza- 
tions become more active because of 
the message he brings. We confi- 
dently expect good things to follow 
in his wake. He has been to South 
Main Street, High Point, Asheboro, 
Farmer, and Randleman. Good con- 
gregations greeted him at every point 
and all felt it was good and profitable 
to be there. 

His remaining dates are as fol- 
lows: Reidsville, January 21, 7:30 
p. in.; Wentworth circuit, Carmel, 
January 22, 11 a. m.; -Greensboro, 
Centenary, January 22, 7:30 p. m.; 
Pleasant Garden circuit, Pleasant 
Garden, January 23, 11 a. m.; Ashe- 
boro circuit, Cedar Falls, January 23, 
7:30 p. m.; Franklinsville, January 
24, 11 a. m.; Ramseur, January 24, 
7:30 p. m. 

Brother Terrell's field of labor is 
Porto Alegro, a city of 100,000 popu- 
lation where the laymen of our con- 
ference propose to build a church to 
cost $20,000. These meetings how- 
ever, are not occasions for gathering 
money, but for instruction and spirit- 
ual enthusiasm. 

Let pastors, Sunday school work- 
ers, Leaguers, the missionary] socier 
ties, lay leaders and everybody else 
do all they can to make these ser- 
vices a great success. 

Let earnest prayers be made for 
the baptism of the Holy Spirit on all 
of Brother Terrell's work at all these 
places. 

W. R. WARE, P. E. 



Shelby District Meeting. 

Upon notice from Rev. C. F. Sher- 
rill, presiding elder of the district, 
there was a meeting of the preachers, 
district stewards and representatives 
of the Laymen's Movement at Shelby, 
N. C, January 13th. 

The preachers' meeting was organ- 
ized with the presiding elder in the 
chair, and J. B. Carpenter elected sec- 
retary. 

The object of the meeting was ex- 
plained by the presiding elder , and 
the subject of "Early and full collec- 
tions," was discussed by Rev. Dr. 
Scroggs, Revs. D. F. Carver, W. V. 
Honeycutt, and Brethren B. T. Mor- 
ris and J. D. Lineberger, setting forth 
plans adopted and success attending 
past efforts. 

"The pastor and the revival," was 
interestingly and earnestly discussed 
by Rev. F. L. Townsend and others. 

The district stewards' meeting then 
organized with the presiding elder 
in the chair and J. A. Anthony secre-s 
tary. The presiding' elder's salary 
was fixed at the same figures of last 
year — $1,600. The increased appro- 
priation of the Annual Conference 
was divided among the several charg- 
es, with a readjustment in the case 
of one or two charges. 

At night, J. S. Martin, chairman of 
the Lay Movement for the district, 
took the chair and J. A. Anthony was 
elected secretary. Interesting dis- 
cussions of the various subjects in 



January 21, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



the program in last week's Advocate 
•were led by J. S. Martin, R. B. Miliar, 
Rev. W. L. Killian, and J. A. Anthony, 
with a number of others engaging in 
the discussions. 

It was resolved that the minimum 
salary of pastors in this district 
should be $600, and that the laymen 
work to this end. 

It was further resolved that the lay- 
men put forth an effort to raise dur- 
ing the next two years, over and 
above other church assessments, the 
sum of $723, to aid in building a 
church in Brazil." 

It was further resolved that the 
thanks of this meeting be voted the 
good people of Shelby for our hospit- 
able entertainment. 

In giving the above report of this 
joint meeting, it seems not out of 
place to say that there was a fine at- 
tendance considering the weather, 
there being representatives from all 
the charges, save one, and number- 
ing all together, 41. The start for 
a good year has been made, and with 
J. S. Martin, captain of finance, -in 
the lead, with a noble band of fol- 
lowers upholding his hands, the pre- 
siding elder and his preachers will 
be largely exempt from "serving ta- 
bles", and can give their time to 
shepherding the flock, and seeking 
the lost sheep. It was a good meet- 
ing. 

J. B. C. 



Our Methodist Training School it- 
self, where these meetings were held, 
is one of our own institutions that 
has grown up so quickly that many 
of us are sufficiently acquainted wirh 
it to fully appreciate its value. With 
a splendid plant already worth forcy 
to fifty thousand dollars, admirably lo- 
cated in the heart of Nashville, the 
the center of our Methodism, with 
four well equipped buildings and x 
fifth in process of erection, with an 
able faculty, and an enrollment of 
sixty-six pupils, representing the very 
flower of the young womanhood (a 
few young men are enrolled) of our 
church, in training for practical 
Christian work, this growing institu- 
tion will soon reach proportions of 
which all Southern Methodism will 
be proud. 

H. C. SPRINKLE 



Conference of Missionary Leaders. 

It was my very happy privilege, as 
the representative of the Board of 
Missions of the Western North Car- 
olina Conference, to attend the con- 
ference of missionary leaders held in 
Nashville, Tenn., on December 30 
and 31. It is an inspiration, indeed, 
to come in touch with a body of men 
like this, coming up from all parts of 
our connection, with hearts on fire 
with a holy zeal for the Master's 
work, bearing afresh the lessons that 
have been gathered from the rich 
fields of experience, and pointing out 
the special needs that confront our 
great church work. For a brief sum- 
mary of the doings of this conference 
of workers, let the reader refer to 
the Christian Advocate of January S. 

While in Nashville, I was fortunate 
enough to be able to remain over for 
a part of the ten days' Mid-winter In- 
stitute which was being held at the 
Methodist Training School. It is ad- 
mitted, on every hand, that one of 
the crying needs of the church is 
more trained men, and better trained 
men, both for the work at home and 
in foreign fields. This need the in- 
stitute hopes, in some meagre meas- 
ure, to meet. It is true that ten days 
cannot furnish sufficient training for 
any man, but an institute such as 
that held at the Training School un- 
der the supervision of Dr. Lambuth 
and his co-workers, with addresses 
and round table exercises on the 
most practical questions that come 
up in our work, by strong men like 
Dr. McMurry, Bishop Atkins, Dean 
Tillett, Dr. Denny, Dr. E. O. Brown, 
Rev. Geo. R. Stuart, Bishop Hoss, 
Bishop W. F. McDowell, Prof. Jno. E. 
McFayden, and others of the same 
rank, cannot but be helpful to any 
young man who comes under the in- 
fluence of the same. I think, there- 
fore, that our conferences could not 
do a better thing than to encourage 
our young men to avail themselves, 
whenever it is within their reach, of 
the advantaged offered by this in- 
stitute work. Furthermore, it might 
be said that it would do the older 
ones no harm to thus mingle with 
their brethren for awhile, and, if 
there is nothing that they need to 
learn, impart to others some of their 
own matured wisdom. 



Itinerary of Rev. J. M. Terrell. 

The itinerary of Rev. J. M. Terrell 
in the Statesville district, February 
2d to 7th, is as follows: 

February 2, Davidson, 7:30 p. m.; 
February 3, Mooresville, 7:30 p. m.: 
February 4, Hiddenite, 2:00 p. m.; 
February 4, Stoney Point, 7:30 p. m.: 
February 5, Catawba, 2:30 p. m. ; Fel- 
ruary 5, Hickory, 7:30 p. m.; Febru- 
ary 6, West Hickory, 11 a. m.; Febru- 
ary 7, Broad Street, Statesville, 11 a. 
m.; February 7, Race Street, States- 
ville, 7:30 p. m. 

Brother Terrell is one of our most 
efficient missionaries in Brazill. He 
will bring home to us the work we 
read of. Let every pastor see that 
these meetings are well advertised, 
and urge a large attendance. Let 
our leading workers in the church 
both hear and meet him, and in ev- 
ery possible way make his visit help- 
ful to the cause of world evangeliza- 
tion. 

J. N. HUGGINS. 



League has selected the first Sunday 
in February as "League Field Day," 
and requests all the preachers in the 
state, who have pastorates and can 
do so, to observe this day by preach- 
ing on some phase of the temperance 
work, thus creating sentiment, and 
taking a collection for the North Car- 
olina Anti-Saloon League, thus mak- 
ing it possible for us to carry on our 
work. I cannot too strongly empha- 
size the necessity of observing this 
day. It will mean much to our cansj 
over the state. Therefore I beg you 
my brother, to observe it. If one 
thousand pulpits in North Carolina 
should speak out for law-en force mom 
on the first Sunday in February, I 
am persuaded that violators would 
either reform or seek another state. 

If you desire any literature for this 
occasion I shall be glad to furish you. 
Truting that one and all will co-oper- 
ate to make this day a red-letter day 
for law-enforcement in the Old Nortn 
State, I am, 

Fraternally yours, 

R. L. DAVIS, 
Supt. N. C. Anti-Saloon League. 



A Word to Pastors About .Law-En- 
forcement and "Field Day." 

Our hearts are rejoicing today be- 
cause no longer can liquor be legally 
manufactured and sold in North Car- 
olina. Surely we have cause for 
praise. Let us remember however 
that this prohibitory law is not ths 
prohibition of the traffic. This will 
only come when officers and citizens 
shall co-operate for law-enforcement; 
and this is the matter to which I 
want to call your attention. 

The church has always taught 
obedience to law. Her influence has 
ever been a check on lawlessness and 
rebellion. Surely in this hour it Will 
not be otherwise. Already several 
branches of the church have adopted 
ringing resoltions in their annual 
gatherings for law-enforcement and 
pledged their support and assistance. 
These bodies, as a whole, have don 5 
all that they can do, and it remains 
now for each member of these sev- 
eral bodies to carry into execution 
the order of work outlined by its 
body. 

There is a spirit of law-enforce- 
ment all over the state, and if, as 
leaders of the people, we pastors will 
use our pulpits and stress the matter 
of obedience to law, in accord witn 
the resolutions of these annual gath- 
erings, and give our full influence for 
law-enforcement, I feel that we will 
have little trouble in the execution of 
our law. On the other hand, if we 
fail to speak out and thus guide the 
people I fear that the officers will 
have a fruitless task trying to con- 
vict the violator. Therefore please 
let me suggest that you be not slow 
to convince your congregation that 
your pulpit will be used to encourage 
law-enforcement. 

To this end the Executive Commit- 
tee of the North Carolina Anti-Saloon 



The Methodist Benevolent Assoiu- 
tion. 

To the members of the Western 
North Carolina Conference Auxiliary 
it affords us very great pleasure to 
give the following facts and figures, 
viz, Since the merging of your Con- 
ference Brotherhood with the Asso- 
ciation by which it became an Auxili- 
ary the Association has paid to the 
widows and orphans of deceased 
members of your conference the sum 
of $10,629. And it will settle another 
benefit claim of $1,000, which is now 
on file, within due time. 

The Association has collected since 
the merger four years ago from tiie 
members of the auxiliary the sum of 
about $7,000.00. 

During this time an average of six- 
ty-five members of the auxiliary haze 
maintained membership and carried 
protection for their loved ones to the 
amount of $1,000 each, total $65,000, 
and seventy members have maintain- 
ed membership and carried protec- 
tion for $500 each, total $35,000: 
grand total $100,000. 

In all the Annual Conferences it 
has paid to date the neat sum of $70,- 
000 to the widows and orphans of 
deceased members. 

Yours truly, 
J. H. SHUMAKER, Sec'y. 

Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 15, 1909. 



More About the Brotherhood. 

I have read Dr. Chreitzberg's let- 
ter of last week, and the letters ol 
this week in the Advocate concern- 
ing our Brotherhood. I fear these 
good brethren are making a mistako. 
I have also read very carefully the 
literature recently sent out by the 
Methodist Benevolent Association at 
Nashville. It seems to me that the 
Association did the only thing it 
could do. The income from regular 
assessments did not pay the death 
claims. The members refused to al- 
low special assessments to be levied. 
Members were dying, and no mon^y 
in sight to pay the benefit. Some- 
thing had to be done. Old men were 
dying. Young men were not joining 
in sufficient numbers to keep up a 
healthy balance. In that condition 
the friends of the institution saw. that 
one of two things must come. A. 
change must be made so as to put 
the association on a business basis, 
sound and stable, or quit. They chose 
the former course. They did two 
things: 1. They established assess- 
ments graded by the age of members, 
and unchangeable for life. 2. They 
stopped the age grade at 60. Now I 
cannot see that they could well have 



done anything else. It was a mutuul 
benefit association, not designed to 
make money, but to furnish insurance 
to its members at cost. The assess- 
ments fell below cost, and must be 
raised. To raise them on the young 
men, and not on the old would be 
violative of all insurance rules. More- 
over, it would have been a destruc- 
tive policy, as I see it. So the sys- 
tem of age grading seems fair to me, 
even if it does greatly increase the 
as sessments. 

I fear we have been trying to get 
something for nothing. In other 
. ords, we have expected stable insur- 
ance at very low rates. The history 
of cheap insurance is wei; Known to 
all who ever studied the subject. The 
history of the past sho.vs the insta- 
bility of all asse sment companies. 
From n-y view point the Methodist 
Benevolent Association has don 2 
about the most sensible thing any a«- 
ess . ent company could have douj. 
They have put the company on a sta- 
ble foundation. 

In August la t, the membership of 
the Association was 1,510, of whoi.i 
139 were from our conference. Th3 
course being pur. ued by Dr. Chreit.z- 
berg, and others under his influent-, 
is sure to worK disastrou ly to the 
asociation. Some of us are getting 
beyond the age limit of insurance. 
We have been keeping our dues paid 
up for years in the Brotherhood and 
in the Association since we went into 
it. Now, shall we strike the dead 
blow to the a sociation? I am sorry 
to see it die. Dr. Chreitzberg says 
he has been paying into some broth- 
erhood for thirty years, only to let 
it lapse at last. This is just where 
I think he has made the mistake. He 
let it lapse. Why not keep it up? 

After all, could we reasonably ex- 
pect anything else to happen? Ev- 
ery assessment company takes the 
same road, the road of increased as- 
sessments. Only I think this asso- 
ciation acted more wisely than most 
of them do. And then, this insurance 
is still cheaper than the old-line com- 
panies. Read the table of compara- 
tive rates on page 7 of "Our Brother- 
hood." Take, for example, the age 
of 50. Old-line premium, $48.48: 
Methodist Benevolent Association, 
$34.40, a little over 40 per cent, 
cheaper than the old-line companies. 
If all of us would stick to the associ- 
ation it would prosper, and after a 
while begin to pay back to the old, 
helpless, superannuates something 
this side the grave. 

But if another Brotherhood is or- 
ganized in our conference, the wis- 
dom of which I doubt, then there is 
nothing left for us to do, it seems to 
me, but to drop out of the associa- 
tion, and go into the new brother- 
hood. But how can we organize till 
we can get together? What one man 
may say as to rates and rules may 
not be accepted by the body when to- 
gether. 

Brethren, let us not fly off at a tau- 
gent, lest we lose our orbit, and go 
whirling wildly through space, fine- 
ly to land nowhere. 

As I see it now, if I go into another 
Brotherhood of the conference it will 
be on the same principle that led Zeb 
Vance to go with his state out of the 
union. 

R. M. TAYLOR. 
Franklin, N. C, Jan. 15, 1909. 

Additional Field Notes on Page 1 1 



The one plain duty of every man 
is to face the future as he faces the 
present, regardless of what it may 
have in store for him, and, turning 
toward the light, as he sees the light, 
to play his part manfully, as a man 
among men. — Theodore Roosevelt. 



8 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 21, 1909. 



The Christian Life. 



THE ANCHOR WATCH. 

"I often recall," says an old sail- 
or, "my first night at sea. A storm 
had come up, and we had put back 
under a point of land which broke 
the wind a little, but still the sea had 
a rake on us, and we were in dan- 
ger of drifting. I was on the anchor 
watch, and it was my duty to give 
warning in case the ship should drag 
her anchor. It was a long night to 
me. I was very anxious whether I 
should know if the ship really did 
drift. How could I tell? I found 
that, going forward and placing my 
hand on the chain, I could tell by 
feeling of it whether the anchor was 
dragging or not; and how often that 
night I went forward and placed my 
hand on that chain! And very often 
since then I have wondered whether 
I am drifting away from God, and 
then I go away and pray. 

"Sometimes during that long, 
stormy night I would be startled by 
a rumbling sound, and I would put 
my hand on the chain, and find it 
was not the anchor dragging, but 
only the chain grating against the 
rocks at the bottom. The anchor 
was still firm. And sometimes now, 
in temptation and trial, I become 
afraid, and upon praying I find that 
away down deep in my heart I do 
love God, and my hope is in his sal- 
vation. And I just want to say a 
word to you boys: Boys, keep an 
anchor watch, lest before you are 
aware, you may be upon the rocks. — 
Selected. 



THE STIMULUS OF FRIENDSHIP. 

"Our chief want in life," says 
Emerson, "is somebody who shall 
make us do what we can. This is 
the service of a friend. With him 
we are easily great. There is a sub- 
lime attraction in him to whatever 
virtue there is in us. How he flings 
wide open the door of existence! 
What questions we ask of him! What 
an understanding we have! How 
few words are needed! It is the only 
real society. A real friend doubles 
my possibilities and adds his 
strength to mine and makes a well- 
nigh irresistible force possible to 
me." 

The faith of friends is a perpetual 
stimulus. How it nerves and encour- 
ages us to do our best, when we feel 
that scores of friends really believe 
in us when others misunderstand and 
denounce us! Many a man has told 
me that there were periods in his life 
when he would have failed but for 
the thought that his friends had im- 
plicit faith in him, and believed that 
he would finally triumph. 

What is more sacred in this world 
than our friendships! One of the 
most touching things I know of is the 
office of a real friend to one who is 
not a friend to himself — one who 
has lost his self-respect, his self-con- 
trol and fallen to the level of the 
brute. Ah! this is friendship, in- 
deed, which will stand by us when 
we will not stand by ourselves! I 
know a man who thus stood by a 
friend who had become a slave to 
drink and all sorts of vice that even 
his family turned him out of doors. 
When his father, mother and wife 
and children had forsaken him, this 
friend remained loyal. He would fol- 
low him nights in his debauches and 
many a time saved him from freez- 
ing to death when he was so inebri- 
ated that he could not stand. Scores 
of times this friend would leave his 
home and hunt in the slums for him. 
to keep him from the hands of a 
policeman, and to shield him from 



the cold when everyone else had for- 
saken him; and this great love and 
devotion finally redeemed the fallen 
man and sent him back to decency 
and to his home. Can any money 
measure the value of such devotion? 
— O. S. Marden. 



meal in the parsonage flour barrel. 

The brother who is willing to do 
small jobs out of view of the crowd. 

The Sabbath school superintendent 
who longs for the salvation of his 
pupils. — The Christian Evangelist. 



I 



WHAT GIVES LIFE AND LIGHT. 

"I have been diligent with my work 
since the last lesson," said an art 
student to her instructor, "but I can- 
not make the vase of white flowers 
look like anything but death on a 
pale horse. There is no life to them 
at all, though I studied the real ones 
and copied them as well as I could." 

"And I can't make this figure stand 
out," said another. "It looks f.at, 
without the solidity that there is in 
the model." 

The teicher took brush and crayon 
in turn to give an object lesson upon 
the vital need in each case. Under 
her touch the flowers seemed actual- 
ly fragrant, and the carved panel in 
black and white looked as if one 
might put a hand clear around it, 
as it started from the surface. 

"I don't see what makes the differ- 
ence," said an on-looker, unskilled 
in art. 

"I put just a little more sunshine 
in the flowers by adding a touch of 
yellow in the center," was the re- 
ply; "but in both cases the shadows 
did it all. I deepened these, and the 
dead came to life. The shadows do 
it always." 

The hearer listened to a lessor un- 
derneath the words. Whoever heard 
of a life "standing out" in perpetual 
sunshine? The shadows do it. The 
Divine Artist knows. — Young People 



THE FOOTPATH TO PEACE. 

To be glad of life, because it gives 
you the chance to love and to work 
and to play and to look up at the 
stars; to be satisfied with your pos- 
sessions, but not contented with 
yourself until you have made the 
best of them; to despise nothing in 
the world except falsehood and mean- 
ness, and to fear nothing except cow- 
ardice; to be governed by your ad- 
mirations rather than by your dis- 
gusts; to covet nothing that is your 
neighbor's except his kindness of 
heart and gentleness of manners; to 
think seldom of your enemies, often 
of your friends, and everyday of 
Christ; and to spend as much time 
as you can, with body and with spir- 
it, in God's out-of-doors — thtse are 
little guide-posts on the footpaths of 
peace. — Henry Van Dyke. 



358ft 



||f U r || you put the life Insurance 
II Hill a K tu t Off witrj the promise Ol 
■■inn nex t week, next month or 
next year, do you ever reflect low 
very uncertain It Is wbtther he can 
do you any good then? 

If you are alive when the time 
con es around, and want the < OM- 
PAN Y, the Company may n&t want 
Y'>U. Any one of a dr zen things may 
turn up to disqualify .you for Insur- 
ance. 

That cough may return, or your 
we'gbt m*y Increase or decrease be- 
y* nd the limits, or. added to a none 
too good fomlly record some of your 
near relatives may have been carried 
off by a prejudiced malady. 



IT IS A GOOD DAY WHEN THE MAN AND 
COMPANY BOTH CONCLUDE THEY 
WANT EACH OTHER 

—and "Everybody wants the 
NORTHWESTERN now." 
See our agent NuW or write to me 
for rates. 



T. A. CARY. 

General Agent, Virginia and North Carolina 
601 MUTUAL BUILDING 
RICHMOND. VIRGINIA 



You need not be afraid to keep 
Cod's commands; you need not think 
you will maybe fail if you do as he 
wants you to do. The only thing 
you really need to fear is that you 
may fail to keep to his ways. If you 
keep his will, he will keep you, that 
is certain. — Ex. 



Boy — "Sixpenn'orth o' cod liver 
oil, please, sir. An', I say, don't give 
me too much, 'cos it's me what's got 
to drink it." — Punch. 




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Send us your name and address 
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what it will do, price, etc. 

COUNTY AGENTS WANTED 

MASTERS PLANTER CO 

174 So. Water St., Chicago, III 



LOOK OUT— NOT IN. 

"The clouds are always beautiful 
and clean, no matter what is in the 
house. Just look out, mamma," said 
a little girl to her mother who stood 
on the doorstep of the dingy factory 
tenement, bemoaning the smoky dis- 
colored walls. 

The mother looked out. The strip 
of green by the river's edge, the 
great rolling white clouds, and the 
deep blue of the calm, far-reaching 
sky entered her heart and soul and 
made her forget the poverty and 
grime." 

What a blessing that our homes 
have windows, that we catch a 
glimpse of heaven's blue any hour 
that we look out into the sunshine! 

All we have to do is to lift our 
eyes and thoughts from the common 
place things around us, and enjoy the 
beauty that is always there in the 
sky, the restful landscape, or the 
twinkling stars. Nature would not 
have us shut inside drear walls, if 
she could have her way. Like the 
little girl, she bids us to "just look 
out" of our surroundings if we would 
find the best in life. — Selected. 




GOOD THINGS IN THE CHURCH. 

The choir that sings from the 
heart. 

The folks who are sunny and 

sweet.- 

The "shut-in" saint who prays at 
home. 

The minute-men who fill awkward 

gaps. 

The sexton who watches the ther- 
mometer. 

The parent who belives in the con- 
version of his children. 

The young people who gladly help 
in Louse-to-house worship. 

The young man who pleads with 
his impenitent chums. 

The treasurer who keeps plenty of 



BLACK CROW 



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Beautifully finished in fast colors and fashionable tints. Assorted sizes 
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tioned below. 

OUR SPECIAL SCHOOL LINE. 

Style No. 914— School Hose for boys and girls. Extra heavy heel and toe, 3 threads, 
built to wear. Sizes 5's to 9 1-2' s in black. Six pairs lor 60 cents, or 12 pairs lor $1.20, 
postpaid to any address. 

Style No. 999— Extra Heavy School Hose for boys and girls; 3 threads, wear like 
leather; in sanitary sulphur blacklor dark brown. Sizes 6's to 10's. Six pairs for 90 
cents, or 12 pairs for $1.75, postpaid to any address. 

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Order to-day. Mention your dealer's name. Address, 

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January 21, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



9. 



Our Little Folks. 



THE DESERTED DOLL SPEAKS. 

She put me away last summer and 
told me she didn't care; 

She was weary of lips like cherries, 
and pink cheeks and golden 
hair; 

She had fallen in love, she whispered 
with a "cute" little Teddy 
Bear! 

So I've waited in here in the dark- 
ness at her Highness' com- 
mands; 

Oh, the hours I've spent in longing 
for the touch of her baby 
hands! 

For, e'en though she loves another, 
she holds me in iron bands. 

If my rival were only handsome I 

would never have shed a tear, 
But, ugh, that horrid monster that 

I never would let come near! 
Oh, the thought of that bear and her 

Highness is driving me mad, I 

fear. 

But I hope some bright, bright morn- 
ing, she will turn to her love of 
old, 

And the Teddy Bear's place will be 
taken by her dolly's head of 
gold; 

And the arms of her loving Highness 
will my waiting arms enfold! 
— Denver Republican. 



HARRY'S BIRTHDAY. 

Nannie was spending a week at 
her uncle's. The day she got there 
was her Cousin Harry's birthday; he 
was twelve years old. One of his 
presents was a new Bible with the 
story of Jesus's visit to Jerusalem 
marked in blue ink. Harry read it 
to Nannie. 

"O!" said Nannie, "he was just 
your age." " 

"Yes," said Harry, "and what a lot 
he knew! Just think! He was 
smart enough to talk with all those 
wise men and astonish them. I wish 
I could do something like that — 
something that would surprise every- 
body." 

"You could mind your father and 
mother," said Nannie; "that would 
be doing like Jesus, you know." 

Harry looked sharply at his cousin 
for a minute, and wondered if she 
could have found out that only the 
day before he had disobeyed his fa- 
ther. 

" How do you know he minded 
them?" he asked. 

" 'Cause it says so in the story." 
"No it doesn't." 

"O, yes, it does! It says: 'And he 
went down with them, and came to 
Nazareth, and was subject unto 
them.' Grandma says that means he 
minded them. She told us all about 
it, and we learned the verse. I'm 
going to begin before I am twelve 
years old to be like Jesus, and mind 
every word my parents say. Begin 
now, on your birthday." 

"Who says I don't mind them?" 
Harry asked, and this time his voice 
was cross. He went away from Nan- 
nie, and was gone for almost an hour. 
When he came back he was very 
pleasant. He let himself be harness- 
ed for a pony, and be driven by Nan- 
nie all about the grounds. At the 
big gate they saw Ben Stuart going 
out with a pail of milk. 

"Hello, Ben," called Harry, "you 
tell your brother Carl that I can't go 
skating this afternoon; father does- 
n't think the ice is safe." 

Nobody but Harry and Jesus knew 
how near Harry had come to disobey- 
ing his father.— Selected. 



A DAUGHTER'S THOUGHTFUL- 
NESS. 

"Has father come yet? I haven't 
heard the whistles," called Agnes, as 
she slipped from her pony and ran to- 
ward the veranda, where her mother 
was sitting. 

"No dear; it isn't quite time. Have 
you had a pleasant ride?" Mrs. Gil- 
ford looked up from her sewing smil- 
ingly. 

"Oh, I had a delightful scamper! 
You can't think how lovely the river 
road is, mother; but I hurried back 
to go after father. It won't take but 
a few minutes to put Jack into the 
cart," and the young girl flew up- 
stairs to change her riding habit for 
a pretty pink gingham. 

A few weeks before Agnes' uncle 
had made her a present of a pony, 
a cart, and a saddle. How raucn she 
enjoyed the rides on Jack's back. And- 
there was always room for two in a 
little cart. 

The whistles were just blowing 
for six o'clock when Agnes drove up 
to the large building in process of 
erection on the other side of town. 
The carpenters were making ready 
to climb down from the scaffolding. 

"There's your girl with her pony- 
cart, Gilford, ' sang out one of the 
men. 

Agnes was watching him, and she 
was more than repaid for her self- 
denial by the look upon her father's 
face as he turned towards her. 

"Hello, daddy!" Agnes called joy- 
ously as he came toward her . 

"I don't know about getting in be- 
side such a pretty pink posy; I might 
crush some of her petals," said Mr. 
Gilford jocosely. 

"Why, daddy, how you compli- 
ment! Hop right in, and Jack will 
take you home in no time; you'll en- 
joy the ride." 

"Indeed I shall! I was dreading 
the long walk. I feel pretty tired to- 
night; but it rests one wonderfully, 
daughter, to think that you remem- 
bered." 

And then Agnes' face grew rosier, 
and her heart gave a quick warm 
throb. How glad, how very glad she 
was! She never thought that father 
would care so much. — The Sunday- 
School Messenger. 



HOW GRANDFATHER SAVED 
THE BIRDS. 

Grandfather is a very busy man, 
but he is aiso very fond of birds, 
and is never too busy to be looking 
after his tiny feathered friends and 
seeing that no harm comes to them. 
Out in the yard he has built a bird 
house, in which the martins live ev- 
ery summer. "Among the trees in 
the yard is a tall arbor vitae, and one 
spring two beautiful redbirds made 
a nest in it. They must have been 
pleased with their pretty home, for 
they sang beautifully; and every- 
body in grandfather's big white 
house stopped to listen when the 
bird concert began. Something else, 
however, was listening too — a big, 
hungry cat who crept about under 
the rosebushes, only waiting for a 
chance when no one was watching 
to climb up the tree in which the 
birds had their nest. But grandfa- 
ther had a plan to save the birds. 
He had called two of the boys and 
sent them off to the hills with a bas- 
ket to gather the long.sharp thorns 
that grow on the honey locust tree. 
They couldn't imagine what he was 
going to do with those great, ugly 
thorns; but they did not stop to ask 
questions, for grandfather always 
was thinking of something strange to 



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J. W. Scott, Vice President F. H. Nicholson. Assistant Cashier. 

J. W. case, Manager Savings Department. 



THE SHOW CASES WITH THE PATENTED CLEANING DEVICE. 



HIGH 
POINT 



SHOW CASE WORKS 



Drug Store 
Outfits. 



HIGH POINT, N. C. 



Dept. A 



- HELM'S BABYOLINE - 



Formerly Helms' Croupaline 



AN EXTERNAL REMEDY 

For croup, colds and whooping cough in children — colds, soreness in chest and 
cold in head in adults. Physicians prescribe it and get the best of results. 
Guaranteed under the pure food and drug act, June 30th, 1906. Guarantee 
2399. Sold by all druggists. 25c for two ounce box. 



J. D. HELMS, Manufacturing Chemist, 

310 S. Elm St.. Opposite McAdoo Hotel, Greensboro. N. C. 



do that was just sure to be the right 
thing. 

I am sure that you could never 
guess what he wanted the thorns for, 
so I will tell you. With stout string 
he tied them to the trunk of the tree, 
round and round, row after row, close 
together, until no cat in the world 
would think of trying to climb that 
tree. So the birds lived happily in 
their cozy home until the baby birds 
were grown and the winter came, 
when they all flew away to the warm 
Southland. — L. P. McAroy, in Les- 
sons for Our Juniors. 




A SONG OF THE BRUSH BRIGADE 

Have you ever thought how use- 
ful brushes are? If it were not for 
the different kind of brushes that we 
use every day, we would hardly know 
how to keep ourselves looking neat 
and clean. This is what some one 
has said about brushes: 
"One to brush our. hair we need, 

And one to polish our boots, 
One to clean our nails, indeed, 

And one to dust our suits. 
And one to give our hats a switch- 
ing, 

To make us all look very bewitch- 
ing, 

And that's the song of the Brush 
Brigade." 

— Apples of Gold. 



DROPSY 



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given free to sufferers; nothing fairer. 
For circulars, testimonials and free trial 
treatment write 

Dr. H. H. Green's Sons, Box X, 

Atlanta. Ga. 



A GOOD REASON. 

The wagons of the "greatest show 
on earth" passed up the avenue at 
daybreak. Their incessant rumble 
soon awakened ten-year-old Billie 
and his five-year-old brother Robert. 
Their mother feigned sleep as the 
two white-robed figures crept past 
her bed m-to the hall, on the way to 
investigate. Robert struggled man- 
fully with the unaccustomed task of 
putting on his clothes. "Wait for 
me, Billie," his mother heard him 
beg. "You'll get ahead of me." 

"Get mother to help you, counsel- 
ed Billie, who was having troubles 
of his own. 

Mother started to the rescue, and 
then paused as she heard the voice 
of her younger, guarded but anxious 
and insistent: "You ask her, Billie. 
You've known her longer than I 
have." — Everybody's Magazine. 



COMPANY MANNERS. 

A small boy was asked to take din- 
ner with a distinguished professor, 
and the lad's mother gave him re- 
peated directions. Upon his return, 
the first question was, "Harold, did 
you get along all right at the table?" 

"O, yes, mother; well enough." 

"You're sure you didn't do any- 
thing that was not perfectly polite 
and gentlemanly?" 

"Why, no; nothing to speak of." 

"Then something did happen. 
What was it?" 

"But I fixed it all right, mother." 

"Tell me at once." 

"Why, I got along pretty well un- 
til the meat came; but while I was 
trying to cut mine, it slipped from 
my plate onto the floor. But I made 
it all right." 

"What did you do?" 

"Oh, I just said, 'That's always the 
way with tough meat.' " — Youth's 
Companion. 



THIS WILL INTEREST MANY. 

F. W. Parkhurst, the Boston pub- 
lisher, says that if any one afflicted 
with rheumatism in any form, neural- 
gia or kidney trouble, will send their 
address to him at 704-35 Carney Bldg., 
Boston, Mass., he will oirect them to 
a perfect cure. He has nothing to 
sell or give; only tells you how he was 
cured after years of search for relief. 
Hundreds have tested it with success. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 21, 1900. 



Woma n s F. M. Society. 

Conducted by Mrs. L. W. Crawford, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Assessments for the Mount Airy District. 



Name of Charge 



THE UNIVERSAL SISTERHOOD. 

T am writing to you concerning 
your sister who is in great need. I 
met her in India a few years ago. 
She was only a child in years, but 
very old in suffering. At the age of 
twelve she was married and before 
she was thirteen became a mother. 
Lying on the floor of a mud hut, 
which was her home, she met excru- 
ciating pain aggravated by every 
form of torture that ignorant women 
could devise. After cruel treatment 
too sickening for words, a slow fire 
blistered her body for purification, 
and she lay for three days in a stu- 
por with neither food nor drink, ac- 
cording to the Hindu custom. The 
baby was: a girl and died; so many 
girl babies die in India that in some 
districts the proportion is eighty-one 
boys to nineteen girls. The number 
of girls is still further reduced la f er 
by frequent suicides, — poor little sis- 
ter:! If you were there how you 
would stretch out your hands to save 
them as they turn their beautiful de- 
spairing faces toward the deep wed 
or the stagn"nt pool. 

But the saddest hour is not tne 
hour of birth nor of death. More bit- 
ter still is the life of twenty-one mil- 
lions of widows. Your si:ter is a 
widow, only thirteen, but a despised 
chastity, she wanders about an ob- 
ject of loathing. Ah, little sister, we 
could lighten your burden. We could 
give you the comfort of Christ if only 
we were interested. 

Stand in the street of a heathen 
city and - watch the swarms of chil- 
dren, naked, dirty, diseased. See the 
patient faces of those little girls, sev- 
en, possibly eight, years old. In a 
week some will be married and a 
week later will lie in the hospital 
breathing out their little lives in an 
agony of pain — murdered! God help 
them and forgive those who will not 
help. 

Is this the land — where children 
are taught every form of vice from 
the cradle; where from idols, foul 
and obscene, comes the only thougiit 
of God; where girls are sacrificed; 
where womanhood is dragged in the 
mire; where widow is the synonym 
for prostitute; is this the land where 
the "beautiful religion" of Hinduism 
flourishes? Where are the men who 
in priestly robes from public plat- 
forms in Christian lands proclaim the 
beauty of this beastly thing called 
religion? When these "priests" have 
released from vile heathen temples 
thousand of fair young girls whose 
lives are devoted to the horrible rites 
of heathenism, let them dare speak 
before Christian women of this re- 
ligion, whose very name if under- 
stood would cause a shudder. 

Turn from your Hindu sister to 
that sister in China. She cannot 
come to you. Her feet are bound 
and her life is bound and fettered. 
From thousands of homes in that 
land rises a wail of pain. Shall we 
drown the sobs and moans with 
hymns? "Jesus, Lover of My Soul," 
"He Leadeth Me," are comforting 
and may shut out the sound, but God 
hears the cry from Chinese women 
above the hymns which we selfishly 
sing, and there is not praise but dis- 
cord. Send help soon if you would not 
be too late, for "a million a month 1 n 
China are dying without God." 

No one has pentrated darkest Afri- 
ca who has not entered an African 
woman's life. Born a slave, her life 
at the mercy of her husband, a be- 
liever in witchcraft, filthy, debased, 
naked — meet your sister again, We 



cannot. We close our eyes and turn 
away from all those dreadful pitiful 
faces, only to meet another face 
which we cannot shut out. His words 
ring in our ears, haunt our hearts. 
"Inasmuch as ye did it not unto one 
of the least of these, ye did it not 
unto me. ' 

Ah, but you say, "I gave my dollar." 
So you did after the collector ask- 
ed for it twice, and how many dollars 
did you spend straightway in some 
pretty trifle or pleasure trip? 

Some of you refused even the dol- 
lar for your sister in foreign lands, 
because you believe in Home Mis- 
sions, and of course you can't keep 
up the work here; which system of 
financiering may seem veryy com- 
plete, but it is so unsatisfactory to 
the one billion four hundred millions 
of men and women beyond the touch 
of home work. Or you peep into tho 
slums of New York and Boston, and 
forthwith say, "See, isn t there 
enough to be done at home?" Use 
that same logical bra'n to reason that 
if a lack of Christianity produces 
slums in America, the condition of 
..hole nations, absolutely unreachel. 
mu t be infinitely worse, especially 
as they have not within their own- 
borders trvelve millions of Christians 
to render personal service. 

Perhaps you said with no excuse 
at all, "I don't believe," or "I am not 
interested in Missions." You said it 
not in a whisper, but to influence 
your daughter or your neighbor. How 
many things have you done today for 
love's sake, for duty's sake, in your 
kitchen, your sewing room, your of- 
fice, not because you feel any whice 
heat of enthusiasm, but simply be- 
cause it was your work — hard work, 
discouraging, slow, but your work? 
Are you not bound by the command 
of Christ to do this work, in which 
He certainly is interested? 

You may say my statements are 
exasperated. You can easily prove 
that they are all too true. 

You may say, "No one has a right 
to dictate how I shall use my mon- 
ey." Whose money? Not yours, • if 
you are Christs. 

You may say, "I am too sensitive 
to listen to such horrors." And yet, 
strange sensitiveness, you will by 
withholding help, force your sister 
to endure ihese horrors. 

You may say, "I cannot help it; if. 
they don't know they are not respons- 
ible.' Try that plan with your own 
children. What of present suffering? 
What does God say? "When I say 
ui.'to the wicked, thou shalt surely 
die, and thou givest him not warning, 
nor speaketh to warn him from his 
wicked way to save his life, that 
sair.e wicked man shall die in his in- 
iciuity. but his I. cod will I require at 
your hand." 

You may say a hundred other 
things to excuse yourself from obey- 
ing a direct command of Christ, or 
you may say, and I trust that you 
v ili, my dear Sister, for are we not 
His big family, and do we not believe 
in the Universal Fatherhood — you 
may say — "I have not done what I 
should have done for my unhappy 
sister. I have given little or grudg- 
ingly or not at all. Forgive me, my 
Father, for the past, and the future 
shall be different. As a beginning, I 
take this box or envelope, and will 
put into it each day as I pray for 
my sister, or each Lord's day as I 
go to His house, an' offering, whii:h 
shall make known His love to the ut- 
termost parts of the earth." — Mrs. 
N. M. Waterbury. 



Mount Airy Siatlon... 

Elkln station 

N. Wilkesboro Station. 

Wilkesbor > station 

Rockford Circuit 

Watauga Circuit 

Boone Circuit 

Yadklnvll'e Circuit.... 

Mt. Airv Circuit 

Rural Hall Circuit 

Wilkes Circuit 

Jeffe son Circuit 

East Bend Circuit 

Creston Circuit 

Pilot Mt. Circui 

Sparta Circuit _. 

Helton Circuit 

Jon"Sville Circuit 

Danbury Circui' 

Laurel Springs Circuit 

Total 



Bishops. 


• a 

i a 

-1 

■2 ]3 


Foreign 
Missions 


Domestic 
Missions 


Church 
Extension 


a 
B 
o 
•a 


Educational 
Extension 


Delegates 


Minutes 


Tola Conf. 
Collections 


Presiding 
Elder 


30 


1 1 7 


167 


130 


75 


86 


22 


12 


g 


8645 


8 ! '. "> 


20 


80 


110 


90 


50 


55 


15 


6 


4 


430 


142 


19 


71 


100 


80 


46 


50 


15 


6 


3 


390 


128 


10 


40 


55 


45 


25 


26 


' 7 


5 


2 


215 


70 


12 


40 


63 


50 


31 


28 


7 


5 


2 


238 


85 


10 


40 


60 


45 


26 


30 


7 


6 


2 


225 


70 


10 


40 


60 


45 


26 


30 


7 


6 


2 


2:>5 


70 


10 


40 


55 


45 


25 


26 


7 


5 


2 


215 


70 


10 


40 


55 


45 


25 


26 


7 


6 


2 


215 


70 


10 


40 


55 


45 


25 


26 


7 


6 


2 


215 


70 


10 


35 


53 


44 


24 


?5 


7 


4 


2 


208 


65 


10 


37 


50 


40 


25 


26 


7 


8 


2 


200 


70 


10 


35 


48 


40 


23 


23 


6 


• 3 


2 


190 


70 


8 


32 


45 


35 


21 


23 


6 


' 3 


2 


175 


55 


8 


32 


45 


35 


21 


23 


6 


8 


2 


175 


55 


8 


32 


45 


35 


21 


23 


6 


3 


2 


175 


55 


6 


25 


35 


25 


17 


18 


5 


3 


1 


135 


40 


5 


18 


25 


21 


12 


12 


4 


2 


1 


100 


35 


5 


18 


25 


21 


12 


12 


4 


2 


1 


100 


35 


6 


16 


21 


18 


10 


10 


3 


1 


1 


85 


30 


216 


828 


1174 


936 


542 


576 


155 


86 1 43 | 4556 


150Q 



J. F. HENDREN, Secretary District Stewards 



Assessments 1909, Waynesville District. 



Name of Charge. 



Brevard stat on. 
Can on -Nation.. 

Wavnesville 

West Asheville.. 
Sulph r Springs. 

Lpicestpr 

Mills Kiver . .. 

Clyde . 

Haywno i 

Jonathan 

Beth 1 

North Haywood 
Spr'ng Creek 
Brevard Circuit. 

Total 



© . 

a - 
© . 



15 $ 59 8 41 



S 66 
66 
86 
49 
49 

65 
37 
'37 
33 
29 

29 
29 
20 
16 



541 I 766 I 611 



S 38 

38 
56 
29 
29 

27 
22 
22 
19 
17 

17 
17 

13 
10 



S c 

o © 

o a. 
. « 



aS, 

o V) 

s a 

a! © 

© M 

3 " 

.§« 

H 



S 12 
6 
9 
11 
8 

8 
8 
8 
8 
4 



28 102 



a o 

©T3 

go 
&. © 
c = 

: o o 

3ou 



8 2°0 
260 
430 
245 
255 

245 
200 
200 
180 
160 

160 
160 
110 
90 



* 100 
100 
160 
80 
80 

75 
P5 
03 
60 
50 

50 
50 
40 
30 



R'PDrt of W. M. S., W. N. C. Conference, for Quarter Ending Te\ 1, 1908 



Names of Di tr cts. 


Dues 


Pledge 


F. Bumpass 
Memorial 


Bible 
\\ omen 


Scholarships 


Circle 
of Thirty 


Birthday 
Circle 


Conference 
Ex. Fund 


Debt 


Total 


Ashevil.e 

Charlotte 


8 46.45 
111 15 
13.85 
50.10 
17 50 
20.60 
73.33 
42.20 
68.85 
9.00 
35. 73 


4 176.89 
73.67 
43.0! 

211 00 
19.55 
25.26 

130.91 
77.51 
32.71 
42.40 

101. 10 


'.'ib' 


1.00 




* 0.00 
184. 75 


* 3.00 
8 8.00 


i 4.20 
4.00 
2.00 
.60 
.90 


10.00 


i 251.54 
381.82 

58.88 
276.20 

67.95 

45.86 
235.64 
153.71 
161. 31 

55.65 
186.45 


Franklin.. 


Greensboro 


1.50 








13.00 




Morgantou 






20.00 




Mount Airy 


2.50 
1.00 










Salisbury 








18.00 
5.00 
2.00 
4.00 
3.00 


7.75 
6.50 
3.00 
.25 
8.25 


3. 15 
2.50 


Shelby 






20.00 
34.25 


Statesvi e 


20.50 




Wavuesville 








Winston 


1.30 






37.07 




Total 








4*8.76 


934.0! 


6.55 | 21.50 




306 07 


56.00 


36.45 


15.65 


1865. 01 


AMhpville Y'n^ Ppnnle 14.65 


24.10 
85.45 
211.15 
6.05 












.45 
4.75 
4.20 

.50 




39.20 
135.88 
238.45 

16.05 


Charlotte " " 
Greensboro " " 
Morganton ' ■ " 


41.10 
23. 10 
9.50 




6.25 






3.00 


3.58 


























S lis ury 
Shelby 

Statesvllle " 
Waynesville " " 
Winston " " 

Total • 


17.20 
6.20 

17.75 
5.55 
4.70 


55. 35 
7.00 












1.00 
.45 




73.55 
13.65 
17.75 
14.55 
4.70 


























9.00 












































139 75 


39..10 | 


6.25 






3.00 | 11.35 | 3.58 


553. 7< 


Adult 


488. 76 
139.75 
156.83 


914.03 
396. 10 
139. ;o 


6.55 


21.50 




306.07 


56. "0 


36.45 
11.35 
.95 


15.65 
3.58 


1865.01 
553.78 
363.73 


Voting People 




Light Bearers 






53. 75 


12.50 




Total 










785.34 


1469. 83 


6.55 


21.50 


53.75 


U8. 57 


59.00 


48.75 


19.23 | 2782.52 



RECEIPTS. 

September 17, Conf. Ex. Fund 

in Treasury $ 116.59 

F. Bum. Mem. in Treasury 12.95 

Bible Woman Fund in Treas. . . 15.25 

Scholarship Fund in Treasury.. 30.87 

Col. for Conf. Expense 48.75 

Col. for F. Bum. Memorial 6.o5 

Col. for Bible Women 21.50 

Collected for Scholarship 53.75 

Collected for Bank debt 19.-3 

Collected for Other Purposes ... 2,632.74 



Total $2,958.18 



EXPENDITURES. 

Sent Conference president 

Sent Conf. Cor. Sec 

Sent Conference Treasurer 

Sent Charlotte Dist. Sec'y;'..... 
Sent Greensboro Dist. Sec'y . . . 
Sent Shelby Dist. Sec'y ... 

Sent Supt. Literature 

Printing Minutes, blanks, etc. . . 
Paid Miss Buttrick for books ... 
Paid Miss Tuttle for tuition . . . 
Paid Miss Foster, for tuition . . . 

Sent General Treasurer 

Bank Debt Fund in Treasury . . . 
F. B. Memorial Fund in Treas.. 
Scholarship Fund in Treasury . . 
Bible Woman Fund in Treasury. 
Conf. Ex. Fund In Treasury . . . 



! 4.00 
10.00 

2.63 
10.00 

4.54 

4.20 
12.00 
115.41 
12.80 
54.24 
79.S5 
2,535.85 
19.23 
19.50 
34.62 
36.75 

2.56 



Total ..$2,958.18 



"I know how difficult the struggle 

is to keep a blithe heart and a cheery 

demeanor amid the tribulations that 

beset the best guarded lives. But.. 

I repeat, there are helps at every 

hand for those on the lookout for 
them." 



Don't you touch the edge of the 
great gladness that is in the world, 
now and then, in spite of your own 
worries? Well, that's what God 
means; and the worry is the interrupt 
tion. — Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney. 



Medical Relief Free. 

Dr. J. A. Willis, of Crawfordsville, 
Ird., will mail free to all sending him 
their addresses a package of PANSY' 
COKP^TIND. a pure vegetable rem- 
edy which is a positive relief for con- 
stipation, indigestion, dyspepsia, rheu- 
matism, and la grippe. 



We cannot truly care for the indi- 
vidual either at home or abroad with- 
out concerning ourselves to produce 
a social environment which Is Chris- 
tian in its principles and influence- 
Rev. J, Scott Lidgett, M. A. 



January. 21, 1909, 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



11 



Woman's H. M. Society. 

Mrs. W. L. Nicholson, Editor, Charlotte, N. C. 



From the Field 



The common problem — yours, mine, 

everyone's — 
Is not to fancy what were fair in life 
Provided it could be; but finding first 
What may be, then find how to make 

it fair 

Up to our means — a very different 
thing. 

My business is not to remake 'my- 
self, 

But make the absolute best of what 
God made. 

— Robert Browning. 



The paragraph below is ■ quoted 
from an address by Dr. Kilgo, deliv- 
ered Educational Day at one of the 
Annual Conferences. So pertinent 
are its truths, so nearly the whole 
truth it is, that I beg you to read care- 
fully, preserve and re-read: 



The Bible's Place. 

"What place is the Bible to have 
in American education? It never has 
been put in the secular school as a 
text-book, and it never can be put 
there. The result is that we have 
about put the Bible out of the home 
also, and there never was as little 
reading of the Bible and as little 
knowledge of the Bible as is the 
case today. And never was there n 
time when so many prominent meu 
knew so little of the Bible as is true 
today. 

"The only way to get the Bible 
taught as a text-book is in the church 
school, the private school or the 
school of an independent corporation. 
And the church ought never to sup- 
port any school that will not allow 
the Bible to be taught as a text-boo"i£. 
The Bible is the most thoroughly 
democratic book in the world; it was 
written for all classes and is in reach 
of the understanding of all classes, 
and that is true of no other litera- 
ture. I will accept no compromise 
and no second place for the Eternal 
Book. It must have first place or 
none. And it must be taken in its 
entirety. You keep Cicero and Ho- 
mer in your schools as a whole and I 
claim the same right for the Bible. 
Remember what is said in the close 
of the Book concerning the man who 
adds to or takes away from the same. 
Yes, the Bible must be taken in its 
entirety, and it must be given the 
first place in the home and in the 
school, before it is given its right- 
ful place in education. I tell you this 
old Book must be accorded its right- 
ful place in our education, or our ed- 
ucation will become a savor of death 
unto death instead of a savor of life 
unto life." 



I also quote the following from 
Mr. J. W. Bailey's address at the 
Baptist Association in December. !t 
is good reading for Methodists too, 
and especially I would that we think 
over his reason for the establishment 
of these schools: 

"The Baptists must recognize that 
the state has entered upon a progres- 
sive policy of secondary education. 
We cannot compete with the state's 
public high schools and it is folly to 
undertake to do so. It is the part of 
wisdom to give these our support, to 
vote the necessary local taxes and in 
every way heartily support the 
state's policy. On the other hand we 
have the opportunity to establish in 
twelve or fifteen well-selected com- 
munities a series of secondary insti- 
tutions. We- should not offer them 
as means of mere denominational ed- 
ucation; we offer them only as mak- 
ing for our mission of establishing 



the kingdom of God upon earth. Our 
question now is, 'Shall we undertake 
to do this or shall we abandon the 
secondary field altogether. I am for 
accepting this last chance to round 
out our Baptist system of schools." 



"Whene'er a noble deed is wrought, 
Whene'er is spoken a noble thought, 
Our hearts in glad surprise, 
To higher levels rise. 

"The tidal wave of deeper souls, 
Into our inmost being rolls, 
And lifts us unawares 
Out of the meaner cares. 

"Honor to those whose words or 
deeds, 

Thus help us in our daily needs. 
And by their overflow, 
Raise us from what is low." 

— Longfellow. 



THE "CONFERENCE PLAN" FOR 
BREVARD. 

When you read in the Advocate the 
report of the "Board of Education," 
as adopted by the Annual Conference 
at Asheville, did you feel as I did 
when I heard it read on the confer- 
ence oor that the Scriptures were 
being verified and that truly "to him 
that hath shall be given", or words 
to take effect? For the educational 
appropriations for three years to 
come is placed, and not to credit of 
our account either. So you ask, as 
did I, "Where does Brevard come in," 
and "is the foster child not to come 
into any part of the inheritance at 
all?" But I and you were too hasry 
in our conclusions. These men had 
planned for us better than we knew. 
This school, which represents the 
very heart throb of the Woman's 
Home Mission Society, is to be placed 
in the attitude of a real child of the 
Annual Conference; is to be a real 
part of every pastor's year's work. 
There is to be instituted what is to 
be known as "Brevard Day." the first 
Sunday in March is the date chosen, 
at which time every pastor is to pre- 
sent the school, its needs and its field 
of usefulness. 'Tis the action of the 
conference, and as such will be bind- 
ing, and all congregations must, Dy 
virtue of that action, be brought into 
actual knowledge of this piece of 
Methodist machinery, and to us is 
given an opportunity of helping to 
make "Brevard Day" a day of days 
in Methodism in Western North Car- 
olina. 

MRS. T. J. COPELAND. 



CHAS. IV. MOSELE Y, <ffl. D. 

Practice Limited to 

Diseases of Stomach and Intestines 

Opposite Guilford Hotel 
OVER FARISS-KLUTZ DRUG CO., 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Office Phone 571 * Residence 1345 
Office : 221 S. ELM STREET. 
Hours 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
2 p. m. to 5 p. m. 



West Asheville. 

In due time we arrived in West 
Asheville, and were, of course, re- 
ceived very cordially by this noble 
people. I say noble people, there are 
none more loyal anywhere. They 
have spared no pains in aiding us to 
be comfortably domiciled. 

We have been*on the field but a 
short while, but, if indications are not 
'false, are moving off well. The 
church is in splendid condition — 
largely due to the faithfulness of my 
predecessor, Brother M. F. Moores. 

We have large and attentive co>i- 
gregations— under the present admin- 
istration, evidencing unusual patience. 

The conclusion of 1908 in the Sun- 
day school was a pleasant feature. 
Under present conditions it could not 
be expected otherwise. With an ef- 
ficient superintendent and a faithful 
corps of teachers our church is filled 
to overflowing. The Sunday school 
is a very live wire, as will be seen 
from the following records: There 
were five scholars present fifty Sun- 
days during the year 1908, six fifty- 
one, and ten pupils and teachers fif- 
ty-two Sundays. Two of the pupiis 
of the last named have made a re- 
markable record. Oran Penland has 
not missed a Sunday for eight years, 
and Crawford Penland has not been 
absent for twelve years. Now, who's 
second? 

The recent installation of the offi- 
cers of the Senior Epworth League, 
was an impressive and profitable oc- 
casion. They start wisely and wil- 
lingly. The Juniors, under the faitli- 
ful and intelligent direction of Miss 
Ada Buttrick, is at high-tide — the first 
Sunday in January there were seven- 
ty present. 

We have a courtly, consecrated and 
sensible board of stewards. They 
have assumed all financial obligations 
and have pledged everything in full 
from janitor to bishop. 

A building committee has been ap- 
pointed, and a splendid church, we 
think, will soon be a-building, and 
ready for dedication in November. 

R. E. ATKINSON. 



FROST PROOF 



CABBAGE 
PLANTS. 

GUARANTEED TO SATISFY PURCHASERS 

Price: 1,000 to. 5,000 at $1.50 per 1,000; 
5,000 to 9,000 at $1.25 per 1,000; 10,000 
and over at li.OO per 1,000. Our cata- 
logue gives full Instructions for grow- 
ing all kinds of. fruits and vegetables, 
and mailed on request.. Wm. C. GER- 
ATY CO., The Cabbage Plant Men, P. O. 
Box, 670, Young's Island, S C. 



Maiden Circuit. 

We are pleased that the conference 
returned us to this work. Last ye.ir 
we received 48 members. Forty of 
these on profession of faith. 

On returning from our vacation our 
neighbors greeted us with a generous 
pounding. On Monday night follow- 
ing the first Sunday in January, as I 
returned to the parsonage a little 
late, I was greeted by the night walk- 
ers who came in line to pound us. 
You have read of the terror of the 
night riders, but I tell you these nigut 
walkers mean no harm. They are of 
the Good Samaritan tribe, which pass 
by on neither side, but come on in 
to the pantry in a way that makes 
one feel grateful. We hope to repay 
them in offering the Word of Life. 

On last Saturday, we invited all the 
stewards to dine with us. Three cf 
the churches were represented. 

Since conference we have received 
seven members. W are praying for 
a successful year. 

T. S. COBLE. 




HOUSEHOLD 
LUBRICANT 



Whether it's the carpet sweeper, 
lawn-mower, wheel-barrow, go- 
cart, bicycle, velocipede or any- 
thing else that moves. House- 
hold Lubricant will make it 
move easier and prevent wear 
and tear and rust. 

Household Lubricant is 
a scientifically compounded 
oil that won'tguin, corrode 
or become rancid. 

In 4 oz. and 8 oz. cans. 
Ask your dealer. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 




$65 



PFR MONTH Straight salary and ex- 
iLniuuiuiip enses to men W j ttl 

rig, to Introduce our l'oultv Reme- 
dies. Bank ref's given. Don't an's. unless you 
mean business. 

Eureka Poultry Food Mfg. Co., Dept."58, East St. Louis, III. 



You cannot live every day in per- 
fect fellowship with God without giv- 
ing up time to it. Hours and days 
and weeks and months and years are 
gladly given up by men and women to 
perfect themselves in some profession 
or accomplishment. Do you think that 
religion is so cheap that without giv- 
ing time you can find close fellowship 
with God? You cannot. — Andrew 
Murray. 



STIEFF'S 

LATEST WONDER! 



as 



THE 



Miniature Grand 

Just think, — a wee little 
grand piano only 5 ft. long! 
A wee little grand piano, so 
small it requires only a little 
more space than an upright, 
yet contains all the tonal 
beauties and the perfect ac- 
tion of the large grand and 
a wonderful volume. 

Small enough for the 
smallest parlor; tone enough 
for the largest parlor. 

Costs little more than an 
upright piano, and within 
reach of the most economi- 
cal buyer. 



CHAS. M. STIEFF 

Manufacturer of the 
ARTISTIC STIEFF, SHAW, & 
STIEFF SELF-PLAYER 
PIANOS. 



Southern Wareroom 

5 West Trade St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

C. H. WILMOTH, Mgr. 



8t«ai AUoj CtmrcB and school Bells, tysencl tot 
laUJoiru* The C- 8- BELI- CO.. HlUab«r».0 

FOR SALE 

Cloth edition of Burton H ilnies Lectures. (New) 
Adddess Rev. L. P. Bogle, Caroleen, N. C. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 21, 1909. 



WOMAN'S WORK 



It is a woman's work to look after 
the house, but, for some strange 
reason, woman's work is much harder 
on a woman, than man's work on a 
man. 

This explains why so many women 
are wrecks before 30 and in their 
graves before 50. 

Too much woman's work; — too 
little Cardui. 

Cardui is an antidote to the 
results of too much woman's work. 

It has been found, by those who 
have used it, to relieve women's pains 
and other distressful feelings, the 
result of female ills, brought on by 
overwork. 

Having cured thousands of other 
sick, miserable women, why should 
it not cure you? 

Just read what Mrs. Sarah J. 
Hoskins, of Cary, Ky., says, in a 
recent letter: "I believe that Car- 
dui saved my life. I suffered from 
various troubles for 9 years. I was 
irregular and would nearly cramp to 
death, every month. My back and 
side would nearly kill me. I tried 
everything to get relief, but failed, 
till I took Cardui . Now I can wash 
all day and do my housework with 
all ease." Try Cardui. 



THIS SPACE BELONGS 

Robt. W. Murray 
General Insurance 

308 1-2 SOUTH ELM ST., 
Greensboro, N. C. 

PHONE 163 



The Sunday School Lesson. 



BABY'S 

health makes Mother most 
apprehensive. Gowan's Prepa- 
ration if kept in the home to 
use in on emergency, relieves 
thp Mother's fears. External 
25c; 50c; $1 U0. All druggists. 




(incorporated) 
capital stock. j30.00i). 

RIIQIWFQQ _Whenyou think of goini- to schoo'. 
DUulllLJO write for Catet orue and Special Of- 
fers of the Leading Business and Shorthand Schools 
Address J. H KING. Pres dent King's Business College 
Raleigh, N. Cor Char otte. N. C. 

We also teach Bookkeeping. Shorthand, Penmanship 
etc, by mail. Send for Home Study Circular. 



5=^ 



100 
FINE :-: PIGS 

ON HAND. 

Order before they are 
picked over. 

John A. Young, 

GkEENSBORO, N C 



v5B3SB555 B 5B 



LESSON IV— JANUARY 24, 1909. 
The Lame Man Healed. 

(Acts 3, 1-26.) 
Time — A. D. 30. Place — Jerusalem. 



Golden Text. — By faith in His 
name, hath His naime made made 
this man strong whom ye behold 
and know. — Acts 3, 16. 




THIS 

solid: 

for selling m»vsu.' c holes •■Merit" 
Blood Tablet-. ,J days alloivod to 
sell Tablets, return money and ge& 
ri nc. Addreia "Merit" Medicine Co. 
_Koom ISO • Cincinnati, Oh!o.» 



The Miracle. 

Still in the age of miracles! Je- 
sus believed in miracles. He Him- 
self exercised miraculous power. He 
deliberately commissioned His dis- 
ciples to the same astonishing exer- 
cise. "Heal the sick," He said to 
them when sending them forth to 
their earliest itinerary — "heal the 
sick, cleanse the lepers, raise the 
dead; cast out devils" (Matt. 10, 8). 
Similar, too, His final commission to 
them. "Go ye into all the world," 
was his cnarge, "and preach the gos- 
pel to every creature; whosoever 
shall believe in my name and recog- 
nize my authority shall expel de- 
mons, shall speak new languages, 
shall take up venomous snakes, shall 
be immune even when they drink 
deadly poison, shall lay their hands 
on the sick and the sick shall recov- 
er" (Mark 16, 16-18). Look at the 
commission. Then look at the rec- 
ord. Were demons expelled? The 
record, dwelling upon the high hon- 
or in which the Christian community 
in Jerusalem was held, cites in evi- 
dence that the people from towns 
outside of Jerusalem thronged to the 
capital bringing "sick folks and them 
which were vexed with unclean spir- 
its, and they were healed every one" 
(Acts 5, 16). It has sometimes been 
argued that Paul minimized the mi- 
raculous because in his letters he 
had little or nothing to say of the 
miracles in the ministry of Jesus. 
But Paul did not ignore them. He 
recognized in his letter to the Ro- 
mans (15, 18) "signs and marvels" 
as agencies of the spirit in securing 
among the Gentiles obedience to 
Christ. He claims as the mark of 
a true apostle that his message shall 
be accompanied by "marvels and dis- 
plays of power" (2 Cor. 12, 12). He 
claims also that among the marks 
of a true church are miraculous pow- 
ers and ability to cure diseases (1 
Cor. 12, 28). 

The lesson is a case in point. The 
Christian community exists; but it 
exists as part of the larger commun- 
ity, the Jewish church, from which it 
has not yet separated. Peter and 
John are on their way to the Temple. 
It is the hour of the evening sacri- 
fice. On the way they are arrested 
by a plea for help. The supplicant 
was a beggar who had been born 
lame. Verses 1-10 tell of the solilo- 
quy, the word of power, the healing 
and the "wonder and amazement" 
of the people. 

The Message. 

Are we still in the age of miracle? 
Or did the miracles cease with the 
apostolic age? On this the record is 
not at all uncertain. Harnack, in 
his Expansion of Christianity, has 
shown that for some generations af- 
ter the death of Jesus his healing 
work was continued in the church 
and was an agency in its expansion. 
In the second and third centuries 
the claim to apostolic gifts seems to 
have been restricted to "prophesy- 
ing," "healing of diseases", and the 
"exorcising of demons." But froLi 
the fourth century and on through 
the Middle Ages, the Church extend- 
ed its claim to include the power of 
working every sort of a wonder. 



Then came the revival of learning, 
the abatement of -faith and the rise 
of science, all of which arrayed them- 
selves not only against the miracu- 
lous but also against the supernatu- 
ral. In the religious awakenings of 
the sixteenth and eighteenth centu- 
ries the leaders revived this doctrine 
oi' divine healing and this is theo- 
retically the faith of the church to- 
day. Roman Catholicism, the Greek 
church and a few small Protestant 
bodies make more or less use of it 
in a practical sort of way; Christian 
Science and several minor cults pro- 
fessing faith healing, menticulture, 
psychotherapy and related theories, 
exalt it as cardinal in faith and 
practice. It is not to be denied that 
the popularity of these pseudo-Chris- 
tian movements is in large degree, 
due to this emphasis. Has Christian- 
ity a mission to the sick? And if so, 
what is it and how should it be in- 
terpreted? 

1. The history of the church, as 
we have seen, affirms it. The mes- 
sage of Jesus Himself is not less ex- 
plicit. "Himself took our infirmi- 
ties," says Matthew (8, 17), "and 
bare our sicknesses." To bring men 
release from the bondage of sin, Je- 
sus assured forgiveness in the pledge 
of the cross; to bring them surcease 
i:om suffering and pain so far as the 
occasion was physical, he brought 
them actual healing. A healing 
church would be at least scriptural 
and historical. 

2. Neither the cure of the lame 
man by Peter (Acts 3, 6), nor of the 
cripple by Paul (Acts 14, 10) was one 
for which these apostles were them- 
selves primarily responsible. In 
both instances the cure is specifical 
ly ascribed to "the name of Christ." 
Unless we are prepared to say that 
in the intervening centuries the sym- 
pathy and power of Christ have been 
changed or abridged, a healing 
church is still possible where a con- 
secrated church wills it. 

3. Modern science is not only tol- 
erant but approving in regard to the 
therapeutic power of faith. Man has 
a dual nature. Life, to the physiol- 
ogist, is not to be conceived of apart 
from (1) matter and (2) energy. But 
energy is spirit and in spirit there is 
room for the play of the Divine Spir- 
it by which material or physical con- 
ditions may be subtly but radically 
modified or even revolutionized. All 
practitioners are careful to protect 
their patients from the disorganizing 
reaction of fear, doubt, depression; 
and they are equally careful to in- 
ouce the stimulus and harmony of 
faith and trust. They are not always 
particular about the object upon 
which faith is to be directed. A su- 
perstitious faith which insures phys- 
iological reaction will serve. Even 

so, a superstitious faith has been 
known to beget bodily blessing. But 
involved in all disease is personal 
ity. Well being has regard for the 
soul as for the body. Nothing short 
of faith in God is equal to the two- 
fold reaction which insures health 
to man as an organism and man as 
the image of God. This alone is the 
sort of faith which, with the cure of 
one's ailment, brings also soundness 
of moral character and spiritual 
health. 

4. Are all ministers to become 
physicians? Are all churches to be- 
come hospitals? Not necessarily. 
But a wise minister will not disdain 
to make provision for the care and 
handling of the sick; and a church 
with any proper notion of its mis- 
sion will not neglect its opportunity 



for p ministry of healing. Doctors 
and the progress of surgical science 
may be quite as providential as mira- 
cles. If James were advising the 
church of today he might modify his 
charge to read (5, 14): "Is any one 
ill? Let him send for the elders of 
the church and let them pray over 
nim, while the doctors anoint him 
with oil in the name of the Lord." — 
New York Christian Advocate. 



"Mamma, what made the preacher 
keep saying something about nis 
ears?" asked Georgia. "I didn't hear 
him say anything about them," said 
mamma. "Well, he said, 'O, my 
hearers,' and I thought he meant his 



"How do you like your teacher, 
dear?" little Mary was asked, after 
her first day at school. "I like her 
well," said Mary, "but I don't think 
she knows much for she just keeps 
asking questions all the time." 



Sunday School Teacher — "And you 
have no brothers or sisters?" 

Little Edna — "No, ma'am. I'm all 
the children we've got." — New Or- 
leans Times-Democrat. 

A Pointer. 

As a relish with meat, and es- 
pecially with turkey and other 
fowl, 

LEMON 

Jell-0 

is delightfully refreshing and ap- 
petizing. The clear, clean and 
agreeable tart flavor is devoid of 
the tang that an unskillful com- 
bination of sugar and fruit juices 
presents in the ordinary jellies. 
It can be made in a minute. 

Jell-0 desserts can be prepared 
from the seven choice flavors in a 
hundred different ways, each so 
distinct from any 
other that they 
never pall on the 
appetite. 

No other dessert 
is so relishable, es- 
pecially after a 
heavy meat dinner. 

10 cents a pack- 
age, at all grocers. 

Illustrated 
Recipe Book, 
free on request. 
The Genesee Pare Food Co., Le Roy, N. Y. 





I MADE $12 

Selling This 7-Piece Kitchen Set" 

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are coining money— 
Belling from 50 to 500 
eets per week. You 
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show you how to make 
$3 to $10 a day. OUT- 
FIT FREE to workers. 
THOMAS MFG. CO. 
466 Heme Blrfg. 
Dayton, Ohl* 



"IS THE BEST."' 
Write for Catalogue 
Piedmont Buiineu Collage. 
Lynchburg** V«. ' 



January 21, 190fl. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



The Farm and Garden. 



WHAT THE LEGUMES WOULD DO 
FOR US. 

Attention was called last week to 
the fact that cowpeas in Michigan 
gathered 139 pounds of nitrogen to 
the acre. Now if these results can 
be had up in Michigan, how much 
greater the amount of nitrogen the 
pea will bring to the soils of the 
South in our longer season. A ton 
per acre of 2 — 8 — 2 fertilizer would 
give but 40 pounds of ammonia, or 
about 34 pounds of actual nitrogen, 
more than a hundred pounds less in 
proportion than an acre in the South 
will give. The 40 pounds in the ton 
of low grade fertilizer would cost at 
the lowest estimate, $6. Two tons of 
cowpea hay per acre would have a 
feeding value of at least $20, and ful- 
ly 80 per cent, of its manurial value 
could be saved if the manure is right- 
ly handled, and a profit made from 
the feeding, while the manure would 
not only give us the nitrogen, but 
would add organic matter and tend 
to the restoration of the humus to 
the soil, which the 2 — 8 — 2 will never 
do. 

And yet in the South men are buy- 
ing cottonseed hulls to feed, and 
keeping no stock but the mules that 
have been paid for out of the cot- 
ton crop, and are planting cotton 
year after year — gambling on the 
chances with 200 pounds per acre of 
a poor grade fertilizer, in which they 
pay for sacking and freight on 500 
pounds of worthless filler. 

And then, for every crop planted, 
their continual inquiry is, "What sort 
of fertilizer?" and "How much shall 
I use?" never dreaming apparently 
that if they farmed right they would 
not need to buy any fertilizer except 
phosphoric acid and potash for the 
peas, making at home through the 
peas a fertilizer worth far more in 
the permanent improvement of their 
land than all the chemical fertilizers 
ever compounded. 

Oh, the pity of it all! 



the rows for them to run on. I use 
chicken wire of various widths for 
all climbing plants like peas and lima 
beans. That two feet wide will be 
enough for the peas, except the late, 
tall Marrowfats, which need three 
feet. This wire is cheaper than go- 
ing into the woods and cutting 
brush, for you can rool it up after 
use and put it away and it will last 
twenty years or more. 

In the flower garden the sweet 
peas should either be planted in the 
late fall, or not later than January, 
if you want to get good blooms, for 
planted late, the warm weather 
catches them and you will have a 
poor bloom. The chicken wire is al- 
so the thing for these. 

Then one seldom sees any glass 
hotbed sashes among the farmers. I 
have right at my kitchen door a 
frame covered with glass sashes, and 
all winter long we can cut heads of 
lettuce as wanted, and there is noth- 
ing more wholesome in cold weather 
than plenty of this raw salad. 

Then in early spring we can start 
plants in this frame, or can trans- 
plant some tomatoes that have been 
started in shallow boxes in the house 
windows, to make stout early plants 
for setting outside in April. 



Something From Your Garden Every 
Day in the Year. 

Farmers in the South seldom have 
a supply of vegetables for the table 
till long after the truckers have been 
sending stuff North. This would not 
be so, for there is nothing that tends 
more to the comfort and health of 
the household than an abundance of 
fresh vegetables; and from Virginia 
southward it is easy to get some 
kinds of vegetables from the garden 
every day in the year. 

I am now getting from my garden 
spinach, kale, and lettuce, and will 
be getting green onions in late Feb- 
ruary. I have often seen farmers 
coming into Raleigh and buying on- 
ions sets in the spring at a time 
when they would have plenty to eat 
from the garden if they had planted 
the sets in the fall. And I have often 
been eating green peas from my gar- 
den when, the people in the country 
around had them hardly in bloom. 

I once planted some potatoes in 
Raleigh in December, covering them 
deeply and raking the soil level in 
the early spring and dug potatoes for 
the table the 14th of May; yet few 
farmers in North Carolina have early 
potatoes before late June in their 
home gardens. 

Garden peas should be planted 
rather deep, and six Inches is none 
too deep to cover them, as they stand 
better in the warm weather than 
when planted shallow. Sow them 
rather thickly in the furrows. Then, 
if you want to have a neat garden, 
stretch chicken wire to stakes along 



Selling at a Loss. 

Could a merchant have any capital 
left long if he sold his goods for 
$1.50 and replenished his stock at 
a cost of $2? Any one would say 
that he was a dunce. 

But that is just what the Southern 
cotton farmers are doing. The De- 
partment of Commerce and Labor 
shows that in the two ten months' pe- 
riods ending April, 1907, and April, 
1908, the aggregate amount of cot- 
tonseed meal sold to Germany alone 
for the 20 months amounted to 608,- 
753,564 pounds. If this meal, sent to 
but one European country, sold for 
but $25 a ton, here was $7,609,409.55 
worth of feed that should have been 
fed and the manure returned to the 
land that produced the crop. If there 
was but 7 per cent, of nitrogen, this 
would be 42,612,749' pounds of nitro- 
gen, and at $25 per ton, the nitrogen 
will have brought less than 15 cents 
per pound. The men whose land 
produced this nitrogen then turn 
about and buy the same thing in a 
mixed fertilizer for 20 cents a pound. 

The enormous amount quoted here 
is but the sales to Germany. Great 
Britain and other European countries 
doubtless bought much more, and the 
soil of the South, aided by the far- 
mer that cost so much more than the 
meal sold for, has furnished the 
whole. 

In short, the Southern cotton grow- 
ers are feeding the cattle and en- 
riching the soil of Europe and pay- 
ing for the privilege of doing it, 
while their own soil grows poorer. 
Selling nitrogen at 15 cents and buy- 
ing it at 20 cents, when if the meal 
was kept at home and fed judicious- 
ly, the manure used on the land, and 
legumes grown in a good rotation, 
there would not have been any need 
for spending a cent for nitrogen, and 
the land and the farmers would have 
been getting richer instead of poor- 
er. How long will it take us to get 
rich in buying an article at 20 cents 
and selling the same thing, after a 
hard season's work for 15 cents? — 
Progressive Farmer. 



and exclusive owner of the land 
which he tills, feels more strongly 
than another the character of a man 
as the lord of an inanimate world. Of 
this great and wonderful sphere, 
which, fashioned by the hand of God 
and upheld by His power, is rolling 
through the heavens, a part of it his 
— his from the center to the sky! It 
is the space on which the generation 
before moved in its rounds of duties 
and he feels himself connected by a 
visible link with those who follow 
him, and to whom he is to transmit 
a home. 

Perhaps his farm has come down 
to him from his fathers. They have 
gone to their last home; but he can 
trace their footsteps over the scenes 
of his daily labors. The roof which 
shelters him was reared by those to 
whom he owes his being. Some in- 
teresting domestic tradition is con- 
nected with every inclosure. The fa- 
vorite fruit tree was planted by his 
father's hand. He sported in boy- 
hood beside the brook which still 
winds through the meadow. Through 
the fields lies the path of the village 
school of earlier days. He still hears 
from the window the voice of the 
Sabbath-bell, which called his fathers 
to the house of God; near at hand 
is the spot where his parents lay 
down to rest, and where, when his 
time has come, he shall be laid be- 
side his children. 

These are the feelings of the own- 
ers of the soil. Words cannot paint 
them — gold cannot buy them; they 
flow out of the deepest fountains of 
the heart; they are the very life- 
springs of a fresh, healthy and gen- 
erous national character. — Edward 
Everett. 



Dr. Miles* 
Anti-Pain Pills 

for Headache 

And Other Pains 




Take 
ONC 
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Accident and Sick Benefit 

Steam Boiler. 



GOLD FELLED 



THE OWNERS OF THE SOIL. 

The man who stands upon his soil, 
who feels that by the law of the lanr" 
in which he lives, he is the rightful 



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Name 



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State 



14 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRTSTTAN ADVOCATE. 



January 21, 1909 



Our Dead. 



"I am the resurrection and the Life.' 
— Jesus. 



We will Insert an obituary of 150 words 
free of charge. For the excess of 150 
words we charge one cent per word. 
Count the words In excess and send the 
money with obituary. Observe this rule, 
please. Do not put In original poetry. 

The above also applies to Tributes of 
Respect. 



Dinkins. — Mrs. Georgia E. Dinkins 
was born November 29, 1862, and de- 
parted this life December 30, 1908. 

Sister Dinkins was converted in 
her girlhood and lived a consistent 
Christian life. As a mother and Wife 
she was tender and affectionate, con- 
siderate and patient. She was the 
mother of six children — five survive 
her. She was five years a widow. 
But the God of the widow and the 
fatherless was her God. Oftentimes 
the clouds were dark and heavy, and 
the way was rough, but her heavenly 
Father lead gently by the hand His 
little child. 

She was a great sufferer for a long 
time, and she knew that it was only 
a question of time when death should 
come as a liberator from her suffer- 
ing. 

During her sickness, Christian for- 
titude and resignation to her Father's 
will were beautifully exemplified. Her 
last words concerning her future 
were, "It is all right." 

She was known to her immediate 
family by that sweet name, "Sister." 
The origin of the fact being occasion- 
ed by the bloody strife of the civil 
war. When the news of baby's birth 
reached her father on the battlefield, 
being of tender, loving mold, he 
wrote to the young mother not to 
name the baby until he could run 
home on a furlough. But another 
battle intervened and the soldier was 
forever deprived of the home-coming, 
for he was numbered with the heroes 
of the dead. While waiting for that 
home-coming, the little one was call- 
ed "Sister," and no other name was 
as sweet as this to her dying day. 

God abundantly bless the surviving 
loved ones, with that comfort that 
cometh alone from above. 

G. G. HARLEY. 



Holt.— Sister Queen I. Holt, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Pat- 
terson, of Alamance county, was born 
January 5th, 1856, and departed this 
life December 15th, 1908, aged 52 
years, 11 months and ten days. 

When quite young Sister Holt pro- 
fessed faith in Christ and joined the 
church, and remained faithful to the 
Lord's call to service. 

After her marriage to Mr. O. C. 
Holt, she moved her church member- 
ship to Holt's Chapel, just East of 
the city of Greensboro, N. C, where 
her body was laid to rest in the 
cemetery on the 16th of December. 
Her funeral was conducted by her 
pastor, Rev. A. S. Raper, assisted by 
a former pastor, Rev. J. A. Bowles, 
Here a large concourse of people, 
friends and sorrowing loved ones had 
gathered to pay a last tribute of re- 
spect to the deceased mother and 
friend. 

Her sickness was sudden and se- 
vere, and under the mighty stroke of 
pneumonia, she was scon cut down 
How weak and frail is man. His 
days are as grass. How soon we 
wither and die. 

Sister Holt was a devoted wife, and 
loving mother. She reared a family 
of four sons and four daughters. 

Her greatest desire was to edu- 
cate her children and thus fit them 
for responsible positions in life. She 
made great sacrifice to do this, and 
when she was taken suddenly ill, ev- 
ery child, save the oldest son, was 



in school. An older daughter was 
in far away Pennsylvania in school, 
but a kind providence returned her 
to her mother's bedside only a few 
brief moments before the mother'3 
spirit took its flight. 

As every true mother does, she had 
great anxiety to help to establish in 
each child a good character, which 
she was able to do, and often was 
known to express a desire that she 
might be spared till each had started 
in the good way. This she realised 
and thus her work is done. 

May God's choicest blessings com- 
fort the husband and children, moth- 
er, sister, and brothers, and finally 
re-unite them in the "beautiful city 
beyond." 

Her pastor, 

A. S. RAPER. 



DEATH OF MRS. C. H. CAVINESS. 
An Appreciation. 

Death so soon after conference has 

entered one of our parsonages in the 

Shelby district and taken from us 

the wife of one of our preachers. 

Death is always sad and mysterious; 

doubly sad it is when the mother 

from a loving home circle is taken ; 

it is yet sadder when death comes at 

the glad, happy Christmas time. On 

Christmas day, when the bells of the 

world were ringing, Sister Caviness 

was buried at her old home church in 

Chatham county. By the side of her 
« 

father and mother she was laid to 
rest, in the sure and certain hope of 
a resurrection to a perfect life and a 
happy reunion. 

Her life on earth was a happy and 
useful one. The parsonage home was 
filled with cheer and gladness. She 
shared with her husband, Rev. C, H. 
Caviness, the toils and triumphs of 
an itinerant's life. To her husband- 
minister she was a helpmeet; to her 
children, a true mother; to the 
church a loving worker; to her 
friends, she was ever grateful aud 
kind. 

The parsonage is sadder and lone- 
lier; heaven is richer;? The home 
here has a vacant chair; another 
mansion in heaven is open for a glor- 
ified saint. To the husband and four 
children heaven will be nearer. Our 
loved ones are not lost to us, but 
are gone on before, and await our 
coming. 

Sister Caviness bore the Bible 
marks of a true wife and mother: 
"She looked well to the ways of her 
household, and ate not the bread of 
idleness. Her children arise up and 
call her blessed; her husband also 
and he praiseth her. Many daughters 
have done virtueously, but thou ex- 
celleth them all." 

C. F. SHERRILL. 



WHEN WE ENOW \ THAT WE ARE 
RIGHT WITH GOD. 
It is possible to know that we are 
right with God. There are at least 
four kinds' of evidence. If we love 
the brethren, we may know that we 
have passed from death unto life, If 
we keep the commandments, we may 
know that God loves us. If we believe 
we have the witness within ourselves. 
We may have the witness of the Holy 
Spirit, who joins with our own spirit 
in testimony that we are right with 
God.— Selected. 



UNFAILING HELP. 
The best of earthly help fails. The 
strongest of men know what it is to 
feel their supports tottering beneath 
them. "Vain is the help of men!'* at 
some time or other cries everybody. 
Happy is he who in this extremity 
learns that there is a Sleepless Watch- 
er, an omnipotent Guardian and an 
unfailing friend. — Wm. T. Ellis 



How to Get Rid 
of Catarrh 

A Simple, Safe, Reliable Way. 
and it Costs Nothing to Try. 

Those who suffer from catarrh 
know its miseries. There is no need 
of this suffering. You can get rid of 
it by a simple, safe, inexpensive, home 
treatment discovered by Dr. Blosser, 
who, for over thirty-four years, has 
been treating catarrh successfully. 

His treatment is unlike any other. 
It is not a spray, douche, salve, cream, 
or inhaler, but is a more direct and 
thorough treatment than any of them. 
It cleans out the head, nose, throat 
and lungs so that you can again 
breathe freely and sleep, without that 
stopped-up feeling that all catarrh, 
sufferers have. It heals the diseased 
membranes and makes a radical cure, 
so that you will not be constantly 
blowing your nose and spitting, and 
at the same time it does not poison 
the system and ruin the stomach, as 
internal medicines do. 

If you want to test this treatment 
without cost, send your address to Dr. 
J. W. Blosser, 204 Walton street. 
Atlanta, Ga., and he will send you by 
return mail enough of the medicine 
to satisfy you that it is all he claims 
for it as a remedy for catarrh, ca- 
tarrhal headaches, catarrhal deafness, 
asthma, bronchitis, colds and all ca- 
tarrhal complications. He will also 
send you free an illustrated booklet. 
Write him immediately. 

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Watches. Sterling Silver 
and Plated Ware. 

Clocks that will run, and a large assort- 
ment of fine Pocket Books, <mt Glass Ware 
and >rnaments. We arp the o de*t Leading 
Firm In the city. Everything Is guaranteed 

SUHIFFMAN JEWELRY CO. 

Leading Jewelers. 



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Real Estate 1 
business, 1 



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TO DRIVE OUT MALARIA AND BUILD 
UP THE SYSTEM. 

Take the Old Standard Grove's Taste- 
less Chill Tonic. You know what you are 
taking. The formula Is plainly printed 
oh every bottle, showing It Is simply 
Quinine and Iron In a tasteless form, 
and the most effectual form. For grown 
people and children. 50c. 



WANTED. 



Responsible man with horse and bug- 
gy In each community, salary $5.00 to 
$10.00 per day, to take orders from own- 
ers of Farms, Orchards, and Home Gar- 
dens. A splendid opportunity for far- 
mer's sons, also fruit tree and sewing 
machine agents, to make a business con- 
nection which will become more profita- 
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Young's Island, S. C. 



Quarterly JXCeetings. 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

D. Atkins, P. E., Asheville, N. C. 

Swannanoa, Swannanoa Jan. 2-3 

Burnsville, Burnsville . ; " 9-10 

Hendersonv'e ct., . Moore's G've, " 16-17 

Hendersonville " ' 17' 

Central " 24 

North Asheville " 24 

Fairview, Tweeds " 30-31 

Marshall, Marshall Feb. 6-7 

Hot Springs, Hot Springs... ... " 13-14 

The district stewards will meet in Cen- 
tral church, Asheville, December ISth, 
at 11 a. m. 

FRANKLIN DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

R. M. Taylor, P. E., Franklin, N. C. 

Webster, Webster... .Jan. - 2-3 

Murphy circuit, Tomotla... ... " 9-10 

Andrews station... " 10-11 

Franklin circuit, Oak Ridge ... " 16-17 

Robbinsvjlle, Robbinsville " 23-24 

Hayesville, Oak Forest.. " 30-31 

Hiawassee circuit, Ranger.. ..Feb. 6-7 . 

Murphy station ..... " 7-8 

Whittler, Whittler... ... "13-14 

CHARLOTTE DISTRICT.— 2d Round. 

H. K. Boyer, P. E., Charlotte, N. C. 

Dilworth and Big Sripng Jan. 17 

Belmont Park. " 24 

North Charlotte " 31 

Brevard Street.' " 31 

Unionville, Grace chapel Feb. 6 

Monroe, Central " 7-8 

Lilesville, Shiloh " 13-14 

P'.IK-tnn. Hop.. well " 20-21 

Morven, Union " 27-28 



Prospect, Carmel Mar. 6 

North Monroe and Icemorlee, 

Center " 7.8 

Ansonvillo, Cedar Hill " 13-14 

Wadesboro " 14-16 

Weddington, Weddington " 20-21 

Waxhaw, Bonds Grove " 27-28 

Pineville, Harrison April 3-4 

Calvary " 4.5 

Derita, Hickory Grove " 10-11 

Tryon Street " 18 

Mount Zion " 26-26 

Trinity May 2 

Chadwlck " 2-3 

Matthews '• 15-16 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

W. R. Ware, P. E., Greensboro, N. C. 

Liberty, Liberty Jan. 3-4 

Greensboro, Spring Garden St., " 10 
Kast Greensboro, Holts Chapel, " 10-11 
Pleasant Garden, Rehobeth ... " 16-17 

Coleridge, Concord. . : " 23-24 

liamaeur & F'klinville, R'seur, " 24-25 
Aaheboro ct.. West Chapel ... " 30-31 

Asheboro station Jan. 31-Feb 1 

Randolph, Trinity " 6-7 

Wentworth, Salem " 13-14 

Reldsville " 14-15 

Uwharrie, Concord " 20-21 

Denton, Denton " 22 

Ruffln, Lowe's " 27-28 

Randleman and Naomi Mar. 6-7 

MORGANTON DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

R. M. Hoyle, P. E., Marlon, N. C. 
Thermal City, Thermal City Jan. 26, 1901 
Rutherfordton, Rutherfordton, " 26-27 

Forest City, Forest City Jan. 2-3 

Henrietta and Caroleen, Caro- 

leen " 9-10 

Broad River at Kiestlers " 13-14 

Green River, Lebanon " 16-17 

Cliffside, Hopewell ... " 23-24 

Morganton station (at night).. " 29-31 
Morganton circuit, Glen Alpine, " 30-31 
Hartland ct., Mt. Pleasant ...Feb. 6-7 
Table Rock ct., Linville " 13-14 

SALISBURY DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

J. C. Rowe, P. E., Salisbury, N. C. 

Lin wood, Cotton Grove Jan. 2-3 

Lexington " 3-4 

Salem " fi 

Big Lick, Big Lick " 7 

Cottonville, Cedar Grove " 9-10 

Norwood " 10-11 

Bethel. . " 15 

Concord ct., Mt. Carmel " 1S-17 

Mt. Pleasant, Mt. Pleasant .... " 18 

Central " 17-18 

Kannapolis, Bethpage " 19 

China Grove, China Grove .... " 19-20 

Jackson Hill, Center " 23 

New London, New London " 24-25 

Gold Hill, Gold Hill.. .. .. .. " 25-26 

District Stewards will meet December 
16 and 17, at 2 o'clock, p. m., in First 
Methodist Church, In Salisbury. We 
hope to have Prof. W. R. Thompson at 
the meeting and have a leader's meeting 
of Laymen's Movement In connection 
with the district steward's meeting. The 
preachers are invited and it Is desired 
that every charge shall be represented. 
First Church will provide enter -alnment. 
Please notify Capt. W. B. Summersett, 
Salisbury, N. C, of your coming. 



SHELBY DISTRICT.— 1st Round.. 

C. F. Sherrill, P. E., Shelby, N. C. 
Lincolnton circuit, High Shoals, Jan. 2-3 

Lincolnton station " 1-9 

Shelby ct., Patterson Springs, " 9-10 

Stanly Creek ",10-11 

Lowell, Ebenezer ; 16-17 

McAdenville " 17-18 

Bessemer City ... " 23-24 

West End and Franklin Ave., " 23-24 

South Fork, Ebenezer " 30-31 

Lowesville, Hill's Chapel Feb. 6-7 

Mt. Holly " 7-8 

Polkville, Rehobeth " 13-14 

Belwood, Palm Tree " 20-21 

STATESVILLE DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

J. N. Huggins, P. E., Statesville, N. C. 

Stony Point, Marvin ... ... Jan. 2-3 

Alexander at Liberty " 3-4 

Caldwell, Hudson " 9-10 

Granite Falls .-. " 10-11 

Lenoir ct., Zion " 16-17 

Lenoir station... ..... " 17-18 

Maiden, Lebanon " 23-24 

Rock Springs, Bethel " 24-25 

Catawba " 30-31 

Hickory ct., West Hickory Feb. 6-7 

Hickory station ... ... " 7-8 

Newton ... " 13-14 

WAYNESVILLE D I ST R I CT.— 1 st Round. 

W. H. Willis, P. E., Waynesville, N. C. 

Bethel, Bethel . Jan. 2-3 

North Haywood, Fines Creek. . " 16-17 

West Asheville " 23-24 

Leicester, Leicester " 36-31 

Haywood, Mt. Zion Feb. 6-7 

Brevard ct., Greenwood " 13-14 

Brevard station " 14-15 

WINSTON DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

T. F. Marr, P. E., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Farmington, 1 armington Jan. 2-3 

Thomasville ... " 10-11 

Forsyth " 16-17 

Grace... " 17-U 

Summerfleld, Lee's Chapel " 23-24 

Stokesdale, Stokesdale " 24-25 

Lewisville, Concord ... " 30-31 

Davidson, Good Hope Feb. 6-7 

Davie, Hardison ... " 13-14 

Mocksville " 14-16 

Cooleemee... ... 14 

The district stewards will meet In the 
pastor's study of Centenary church, 
Winston, N. C, Tuesday, December 29, 
at 11:30 a. m. 

MT. AIRY DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 
W. M. Bagby, P. E., Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Rural Hall, Trinity Jan. 2-3 

Mt. Airy ct., Zion... " 9-10 

Mt. Airy station, Mt. Airy ... " 10-11 1 

Sparta, Sparta " 13-141 

Laurel Springs, Chestnut Hill, " 16-171 

Jefferson, Jefferson...:. " 20-211 

Helton, Methodist Chapel " 23-241 

Creston, Big Laurel > ... " 30-31 1 

Boone, Fairview. Feb. 8-4 

Watauga, Valle Crucis " •-T 

Wilkes ct„ Unton 1»-11| 



January 21, 1909. 



15 



Trinity College Notes. 

The January South Atlantic Qaur- 
terly is an interesting number. The 
wide range of subjects and the prom- 
inence of the contributors make the 
number of very great interest. The 
table of contents, is: 'The Uplift oi 
an Agricultural State," Clarence H. 
Poe, Editor Progressive Farmer; 
"Bulgaria: Satisfied and Dissatis- 
fied," Edward H. Elliott, Princeton 
University; "Backward or For war J," 
Edgar Gardner Murphy, Secretary 
Southern Education Board; "Gullah: 
A Negro Patois," John Bennett, Esp... 
Charleston, S. C; "Reconstruction in 
North Carolina," J. G. DeRoulhac 
Hamilton, University of North Caro- 
lina; "Poe and Hoffman," Palaitr 
Cobb, University of North Carolina; 
"Constructive Philanthropy in a 
Southern Cotton Mill," William P. 
Few, Trinity College; "Book Re- 
views," The Editors and Dr. William 
K. Boyd. 

President Charles W. Eliot, of Har- 
vard University, expects to take a 
trip through the Southern States this 
spring; and his published itinerary 
shows that he will reach Durham 
March 24, and remain until March 

v •'■wf tifffl 

President Kilgo has returned from 
South Carolina where he spent sev- 
eral days. He had several engage- 
ments to speak In that state. 

The basketball team has an engage- 
ment to play a game with the Win- 
ston Y. M. C. A. team in the Angier 
Duke gymnasium next Saturday even- 
ing. 

'- Hon. Kope Elias, of Asheville, a 
member of the Board of Trustees, is 
spending some time on the Park the 
guest of President Kilgo. 

•The debate with the University of 
t the South, Sewanee, Tenn., will be 
•held m the Craven Memorial Hall, 
Monday evening, April 12. The sub- 
ject decided upon by the debate coun- 
cils -of the two institutions is: "Re- 
solved, that a Federal Board of arbi- 
tration with power to enforce its find- 
ings and decisions as regards rates 
of wages and hours and conditions 
-of- labor should be established for tha 
settlement of disputes between em- 
ployers and working men in cases 
involving transportation companies 
engaged in enterstate commerce." 

The : preliminary debate to select 
men to represent Trinity will be held 
February 20. A large number of stu- 
dents will enter the contest. 



* An extreme case of eczema 

CURED. 

Winston-Salem, N. C, July 13, 1908. 
Mr. . J. T. Shuptrine, Savannah, Ga. 

Dear Sir: — Nothing gives me greater 
pleasure than when I am singing the 
praise of Tetterine. I consider it be- 
yond doubt one of the best skin prepara- 
tions ever offered the suffering- ones. 

Some 10 years ago no mortal could hav 
been in a worse state from eczema than 
myself. I had tried every remedy, blood 
purifier, skin salve, yet I seemed worse, 
until I was one mass of itching sores. 
Life simply a burden, I could not 
sleep. Could do no work. The physi- 
cians could not help me. I was simply 
desperate. Glancing over a newspaper 
1 received from a lady in Texas who 
wrote you telling her condition and what 
Tetterine had done for her; her case was 
so- much like mine that I concluded that 
I would try it, feeling that if she could 
receive so great a benefit it might help 
me. After two or three applications I 
never saw such a sudden change. I 
am happy to say taat I am well again. 
My case being so bad it took a lot of it. 
I have never known it to fail to cure 
every case yet. I make a special offer 
to any one suffering with Tetter, Ring- 
worms, and Eczema, etc., that if it is 
used properly and fails to cure I will re- 
fund their money I have yet to repay 
any one. Whenever I see any one here 
suffering, from Tetter, Ringworm, etc., 
T prevail on them to get a box, stating 
to them that if it fails, come to me a. id 
get their money back. I have had the 
pleasure of curing many with it. 

Sincerely yours, P. S. EhkLY, 

Tetterine cures Eczema, Tetter, Ring- 
worm, Ground Itch, Infant's Sore Head, 
Pimples, Boils, Rough Scaly Patches on 
the Face, Old Itching Sores, Dandruff, 
Cankered Scalp, Bunions, Corns, Chil- 
blains, and ev( ry f .rm of Skin Disease. 
Tetterine 50c; T. tterine Soap 25c. Your 
druggist, or by mail from the manufa •- 
turer, The Shuptrine Co., Savannah, Ga. 



f& ***** 



Earliest Header. 
Fine, Me-ivm Size. 
Exce lent Shipper. 
Or i-ii us 'orTable 



About ten days 
later than E. Jersey. 
A full size larger. 
A M^rr v MaVgr. 



CABBAGE PLANTS 

EARLY HEADERS 
MONEY MAKERS 



r- k E k r,iest 4 F1 , at ) THESE ARE THE KIND THAT MADE SOUTH 

Cibbage A larre 

yuid. r and a g.<.d < CAROLINA FAMOUS FOR CABBAGE GROWING 

srrpper. t 



They need no introduction. We guarantee FULL COUNT, safe delivery, and satisfaction or your MONEY REFUNDrD. Send money with order, 
othet ise plants will be shipped C o. r>. a d you w 11 have to pav return charges on the mo ey. thus adding to the cost of your plants. 

Prices F. o. B. Young's Island: 500 1 or J1.00; 1,000 to 4.^00 at $l.f0 per 1,0.0; 5,000 to 8,000 at $1.25 per 1,000; 9,000 to 20.0U0 at $1.00 per 1,000. Special 
prices o-i larger quantities. Prompt attention given all orders and inquiries. _ r i Dcnu D _„ mm \/~,,- % „i r . e *» 

. Illustrated catalogue mailed free application. C. M. GIBSON, BOX 44, TOUng S Island, S. G. 




CHURCH CARPETS 




rds FREE 




Home of Andrew Jackson, Stato Capitols, hunt- 
ing scenes, and other souvenir cards of national 
inferest, TEN in all, FK i^E to persons who send 
Jno. F. Draughon, Nashville, Tenn., names and ad- 
dresses of 4 or more young people most likely to 
attend business college or take lessons By Mail. 

IF YOU want TO F'CE from the DOLLAR-A-DAY 
eluss into the FIVE-DOLLAR-A-DAY class, then 
Si' ART RIGHT by asking for FREE catalogue 

DRAUCHON'S 

Practical Business College 

Wisbngloii, Rtkigl. or Co iitbia 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF FURNISHING NEW CHURCHES. 

We have expert men in this Department that we send 
out to make and lay carpets complete in church. Samples 
and estimates sent free for the asking. 

Largest Dealers in Furniture, Carpets, Pianos and Or- 
gans in the State. Write us for our Catalogues. 

PARKER-GARDNER CO., 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



To Home Builders 



Whether you build a cottage or a mansion, you *f» 
will be interested in our line of Hardwood Mantels, T 
Tiles and Grates. Nothing increases the satisfaction «^ 
and actual value of a house so much as a wise selec- 4* 
*|j tion of these goods. Be sure to get our catalogue be- J 
s£j fore you buy. 

| Odell Hardware Company, | 



La Grippe 
Bad Colds 
Neuralgia 



\ 



Cured by using Johnson's 
Chill and Fever Tonic. 

| The difference between 
a Bad Cold and La Grippe 
is this : 

A strong constitution 
will wear out a Cold, but 
Grippe will wear out a 
strong constitution. 

Don't take chances — 
take Johnson's Tonic. 

Made by The Johnson's 
Chill and Fever Tonic Co., 
Savannah, Ga. 

>■■> an I M ivni bottles, friiil 10 c. ut 
bo ties Selit on ivcelp't u(' sta nps. 

\_ . / 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 



REMEDY FOR LIG.UOR AND TOBAC- 
CO. 

Officers of the Anti-Saloan Leagues cf 
s.-ve.-al states have end irs.d a plan of 
mailirg out free prescriptions fjr tne re- 
lit f of the Liciu >r and Tobacco habits, 
that is being carried out by F. Gra .-, 75J 
New Ridge Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. Eith- 
er pi'esci ipti jD can be given secretly, 
and filled by local druggist. The only 
I'ucjuest made is that you enclose stamp 
when writing for th> m an, I J i not sell 
recipes, but give copies to friends. 



January 21, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 




M CURED 

No Experiment. <§ 



Alcoholism, Morphine 
and other drug addic- 
tions cured in from four 
to six weeks. 28 years 
successful experience. 
Write for our booklet, 
"What do You Drink" 
The Keeley Institute. 

GREE NSBORO, N. C , 




Free for the Asking'. 

Write today for Illustrated Booklet descriptive of the most prosperous sec- 
tion of the South for Farmers and Investors. FREE FOR THE ASKING. 

BUSINESS MEN'S CLUB, hUNTSVILLE, ALA. 




DeLoach Line of CORN MILLS. 

Top Runner and Under Runner. All sizes from 18 in. to 48 in. 

We build a full line of portable and stationary Grinding Mills, and 
keep on hand a large stock of mill machinery. 

Send for catalogue of the celebrated DeLoach line of Saw Mills, 
Edgars, Shingle Mills, Planers, Water Wheels, Engines, Boilers, and 
Gasoline Engines. Agents wanted in every county. 

DeLoach Mill Mfg. Co., Box 777, Bridgeport, Ala. 




Drop ufLarSne 
and 

ch< 

our Syst 
be irWtalle 
your Jhouse< 
give a helilthfuj^^ft, 

CRAWFORp. // !-' 1 
Winston-Salem, N. Ci 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY. 

N. B. — Following schedule figures pub- 
lished only as information, and are not 
guaranteed: 

10:18 p. m. — No. 38, daily, New York and 
New Orleans Limited, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Pullman draw- 
ing room sleeping cars, observation, 
and club cars to New York. 
3:45 a. m. — No. 45, daily, Local for Char- 
lotte, connecting ror Atlanta and 
points south. 
4:10 a. m. — No. 30, daily, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles sleep- 
er for New York. 

12:45 a. m.— No. 112, dally, for Raleigh 
and Goldsboro. This train handles 
Pullman sleeper from Greensboro to 
Raleigh. 

7:10 a. m. — No. 8, daily, for Danville 
and Richmond. 

8:15 a. m. — No. 237, daily, for Winston- 
Salem and daily except Sunday for 
Wllkesboro. 

7:50 a. m. — No. 154, daily except Sunday, 
for Ramseur. 

7:20 a. m.— No. 37, daily, Washington 
and Southwestern Limited. Pullman 
drawing room sleeping cars, observa- 
tion and club cars New York to New 
Orleans. Pullman drawing room 
sleeping car New York to Atlanta. 
Solid Pullman train. Dining car ser- 
vice. 

7:50 a. m. — No. 11, daily for Charlotte 
and Atlanta, connecting for Asheville 
and Knoxville. 

9:25 a. m. — No. 44, daily, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles day 
coaches Atlanta to Washington. 

9:25 a. m. — No. 144, daily, for Durham, 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. 

1:15 p. m. — No. 36, dally, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles Pull- 
man drawing room sleeper New Or- 
leans to New York. Pullman drawing 
room sleeper Birmingham to Rich- 
mond, Va., and day coaches to Wash- 
ington. Dining car service. 
12:30 p. m. — No. 21, daily, for Salisbury 
and Asheville. Handles parlor car to 
Asheville. 

12:55 p. m. — No. 7, dally, local train for 
Charlotte. 

2:20 p. m. — No. 207, daily except Sunday, 
for Winston -Salem, making connec- 
tions for Wllkesboro. 
12:50 p. m— No. 130, daily, for Sanford 
and intermediate points. Through for 
Fayetteville and Wilmington. 

3:20 p. m. — No. 22, dally, for Durham, 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. Handles par- 
lor car to Goldsboro. 

2:30 p. m. — No. 151, daily except Sunday, 
for Madison. 

3:30 p. m.— No. 230, daily except Sunday, 
for Ramseur. 

4:55 p. m.— No. 131, dally, for Mt. Airy. 

6:15 p. m. — No. 35, dally, for Atlanta and 
joints south. Pullman drawing room 
sleepers to New Orleans and Bir- 
mingham. Day coaches to New Or- 
leans. Dining car service. 

6:35 p. m. — No. 235, dally, for Winston- 
Salem. 

12:20 a. m. — No. 29, daily, for Columbia, 
Savannah and Jacksonville. Pullman 
drawing room sleeper and coach to 
Jacksonville. Dining car service. 

10:20 p. m. — No. 233, daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

9:35 p. m. — No. 12, daily, for Richmond 
and local points. Handles sleeper for 
Richmond. 

C. H. ACKERT, V. P. & G. M. 
S. H. HARDWICK, P. T. M. 
W. H. TAYLOE, G. P. A., 

Washington, D. C. 
R. L. VERNON, T. P. A., 

Charlotte, N. C. 
R. H. DeBUTTS. P. & T. A., 

DEGENERATES 

Alcohol by .ver-stlmulation produces 
degeneracy. Opium and other narcotics 
by under-estimation also produces degen- 
eracy. 

But Malaria Is the father and mother 
of an army of degenerates and It blazes 
the trail for all those men who can't 
make good. 

The sin of Malaria is degeneracy. 

Wake up. Break your uonds. Rid your 
system of the CURSE of Malaria. 

Johnson's Tonic will drive out every 
trace and taint of Malaria from th. 
blood. 

Price 25 and 50 cents. 

The Johnson's Chill and Fever Tonic Co., 
Savannah, Ga. 



This Great World History, 

SENT TO YOUR HOME FREE 

Just send your name and address on the coupon below — that is all you need to do. It does 

not cost one penny and as soon as your name and address is received a set of the world famous 
Library of Universal History will be sent to you prepaid. 



J-JFjR E '* 8 rea * es * opportunity ever offered — an oppor- 
■ J * viJ tunity for our readers to secure at less than half price 
these fifteen beautiful volumes all printed from large new type, 
embellished with over 100 double page maps and plans, 700 full page 
illustrations, many of which are in colors, and over 5.000 pages of 
reading matter. 

This offer Is made possible by the failure of the publishers, the 
Union Book Co. of Chicago. Hundreds of sets of this work have 
been sold at $60.00 each and they are worth every, cent of it, but we 
now name you a rock-bottom bankrupt price of only 50c after ex- 
amination and $2.00 per month for 14 months. It is impossible to 
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.Before you decide to buy we invite you to examine this work in 
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amine this Library; let your wife and children and friends see it. 
No better set of books could be placed in the hands of children 
than this: it reads like a thrilling novel, and is in fact a complete 
connected History of every country, nation and people from the 
beginning of time to the present year; the greatest World History 
ever written and endorsed by scholars everywhere. 

Prof. George Fellows, of Indiana, says: "Most histories of the 
world are dreary compilations. This work, however, is clear, 
interesting and accurate." 

Ex VIce-Pres. Stevenson says: "It Is a complete record of the 
human race and should find a place in every Library." 

x E. Benjamin Andrews, Chancellor of the University of Nebraska, 
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will be of immense service in stimulating history study in our 
country. It is a work of real genius." 

Prof. Dabney, of Virginia, says: "Southern readers will 
be gratified at the impartial spirit in which the war for 
Southern independence is treated." 

The St. Louis Globe Democrat says: "This work 
invests the study of History with a new charm 
that will be felt by both young and old. " 

15 Massive Volumes 

Each volume 7 inches wide 
and 10 inches high; 
weight, boxed, 
nearly 

75 lbs. 



"NJ F'VF'R BEF °R E >n the annals of the publishing: business 

j-i v J_ix>. jj ave we seen sucn a bargain, we do not hesitate 

to recommend this offer to every reader of this paper; indeed we 
believe every family should own a standard World History, for by 
knowing how other countries than ours are governed It gives us a 
better knowledge and higher appreciation of our own system of 
government and makes us better citizens. 

We will be glad to give you an opportunity to see for yourself 

and make your own decision after you have seen the beautiful 
binding, the magnicfient illustrations and have read parts of this 
great History of man on earth. Then you can decide. Should you 
not wish to keep the work you will notify us and we will have it 
returned at our expense. 

The illustration of the books given here does not do them ] ustice ; 
you must see them to realize what they are. You assume no 
obligation to us or any one else by making this request, you 
simply ask for a free examination in your own home without 

paying any one anything, and remember you can 
send the books back at our expense, and re* 
member, too. this bankrupt rock -bottom 
price of $28.50 for this $60.00 Library 
has been made possible only on ac- 
count of the failure of the Union 
Book Company, thus necessi- 
tating a receiver's sale at a 
price which barely cov- 
ers the cost ot the pa- 
per and binding. 



MAIL THE 
COUPON 




€tettanJ\iitiocate 



ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE OF THE M. E. CHURCH, SOUTH. 



H. M. BLAIR, Editor. I 
W. L. SHERRILL, A»»Utant. ( 



I $1.50 PER ANNUM - 
I In Advance^ 



ESTABLISHED 1855. 



GREENSBORO, N. C, JANUARY 28, 1909. 



VOL. LIV.--NO. 4. 



A HOLY PARTNERSHIP 




HRISTIAN MEN AND WOMEN 
/■^ are partners in the business of 
1 | saving the world. They are not 

\mJ/ divided. They are not par- 
tizans, working and fighting 
against each other as partizans 
in a political campaign, but part- 
ners, working and fighting for each other as 
partners in a great commercial establishment. 
There is a great difference between partners 
and partizans. 

This fellowship includes not only all reli- 
gious workers, but all men and women who 
are engaged in any worthy activity in the 
name and service of Christ. Farmers, phys- 
icians, teachers, mechanics, authors, mayors 
and senators, are all laborers together bring- 
ing on the progress of the race toward the 
kingdom of God, if they are seeking to do the 
will of God in their work. There is no place 
for jealousy or strife. There is no room for 
contention and criticism. Let no man de- 
spise his fellow laborer. Let not the rich man 
look with contempt on the labors of the poor 
man. Let not the poor man envy the ri;h 
man. They are workers together with God. 
The Great Leader who oversees and superin- 
tends all will bring out the final result ac- 
cording to His perfect will and plan. 

Not only great prophets and great states- 
men and great scholars, but obscure and hum- 
ble men and women are in this holy fellow- 
ship ; and who shall say whether those we call 
great or those we count small are more highly 
esteemed by the Head and Leader of all? 
Pastor Wagner, in The Simple Life, tells of a 
stone-breaker sitting by the roadside and sing- 
ing his merry song, whom he passed many 



years ago while on his way to the great city. 
Thirty years passed away and the student 
came by that way again, and saw the same 
man working at the same lowly task. When 
first he saw him he received a word of encour- 
agement from his lips which cheered his 
youthful heart and continued with him 
through all the years. He was one of the ob- 
scure and unknown, but for all that a fellow- 
worker. His word added strength to the heart 
and purpose of one who has since become a 
great man, and how much it has done for the 
world through him none but the Master 
knows. 

George Maedonald, while working among 
the poor in London, attended the funeral of 
an applewoman whose short and simple his- 
tory throws into the shade the pretentious 
story of many kings and millionaires. She 
was very poor, living in two dingy rooms of a 
tenement house, and often suffering from hun- 
ger and cold. But the sight of three orphan 
boys sleeping in an ash-bin touched her heart. 
She began at once to help the little waifs who 
fell in her way. During a period of forty-two 
years she gave shelter, bed, food and such 
other comforts as she could command to twen- 
ty orphan children, helping them to a meager 
knowledge of useful trades, and contributing 
much to enable them to become self-support- 
ing and independent. She belonged to the 
holy fellowship of those who labor together 
with God. 

Let us not labor to lay up fortunes, or 
merely to lay up knowledge, or to win somj 
selfish gain, but to help God make the world 
better and happier. — New York Christian Ad- 
vocate. 



\ I *1f'|WH'A'Ro I > 1 X A C 1 1 JU St 1 A K AD VOC AT K. 



■'" * fS&fcSflh 28, 190) 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 



thohta-' m\i\ affections which distinguish the lruo> work, - and for this they must earnestly £eek, 
man from the mere animal. If a man give be- el e they will be chained birds in " a church-ca; 
cause of the high regard he has for the great law to the last. 



KiiU nj;! according to the Postal Laws and itegula- of God wHifeh " demands that he shall . love his 

liouti in the Po» Oflice in fj roensboro, N'< C, as neighbor-as himself, it will certainly be given to 

mm matter- of the second class. him again, not necessarily in material things,' but 

~ SUBSCRIPTION RATES/" f. thkt soul which wil1 »^ ke 

■ „ „, ?• conscious of possessions Infinitely larger and bet- 
One ^ ear .Jl.uO . . , ' , i .. . 

... , , , ter than material- things. 

Six* Months , ., .|5 —i ; . . • • , ... . ... >. , :• 

•i, „ „„ The gospel of liberality should be preached and 
To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.00 a ye*r. a ... n .,_ . „ , 
preached with all fervor, but it should be preached, 

| . ,o L.dst Gaston Street, Greensboro, N. C. as only- the gospel can be preached, .on the plane 

— of that self-denial which will make one gladly 

- .Ms-i^fjcr m oe continued to subscribers at leaye M to foltow christ . It is distressing to 

tl-.c expiration of the time paid for unless the office kK0>v that in many instances the pulpit may .be 

* notifi!:ci t0 the contrary. Watch your label, and unwit tingl y fostering a spirit of selfishness which 

y° u intend t0 for the pa P er ' d0 not allow is slowly but surely destroying that nobler spirit 

|jto be delivered to you over the time. If you wish of Ch . risljanlty wnich makes tne world one great 

|jur paper discontinued, notify us by postal card. brotherhood. If a man give to the support of the 

L ■ - — ■ ~ gospel only because he expects to get value re- 

; EDITORIAL. ceived and more in kind, how dwelleth the lo^e 

ij of God in him? Did not Jesus for our sakes be- 

> -Race track gambling is coming in for a goo., come poor, that we through- his" poverty might be 
||af$ of drubbing' in different states. It is none made rich? And "yet, in all his self-renunciation 
tpj soon, for there is no doubt that this is one of and poverty, "He saw of the travail of his soul 
tihe greatest evils of our day. and -was satisfied." "For the joy that was set be- 
ll ***** f ore Him He endured the cross." 
! The people of Winston-Salem gave Governor is it not a fact tttat even some tithers have, like 
Glenn a royal welcome back to his old home on Jacob, undertaken* to drive a bargain for prosper- 
fenday evening, under the auspices of the Beard ity, by a' covenant- with God? Such a crime is 
cjf Trade. Governor Glenn retires from public life fearful to contemplate, yet if we are not careful 
fStli the respect, not only of the people of his own our -preaching will help to make it common, and 
qommunity, but of the best people of the whole we will be found to be- abetting selfishness rather 
fkt'e. His administration will go down as one of than destroying it[ ! " 
tihe cleanest in the history of the state. Our best 
jflopie will not forget the heroic manner in which 
dpvernor Glenn threw himself into the prohibition 
campaign. 



"To every member of our churches who is dra 
ging out a "half-dead religio'ri, the Holy Spit 
comes with the arousing call: "If ye be inde< 
risen with Christ, seek those things which a; 
above!" Instead of sitting in the gates of tl 
tomb, ca';t away your grave-clothes, and begin 
live as Christ's freemen and Christ's witnesse 
and the heirs of a magnificent inheritance. Lo< 
higher! Live higher!. Get a new grip on Chri 
and then go out and labor to draw sinners fro 
the pit of hell. This is the revival we all need." 



'February advocate month. 

Our report this week shows that a goodly num.- 



! In passing sentence upon a man who had taken 
Me life of his own eon a few days ago, Judge Al- 
l|n is reported to have made the following very 
ffiinsly remarks: "No man sells whisky for the 
love of it, but for the money he gets out of it, and. 
feiliilg liquor will make any man a bad man. We 
'".cense the sale of liquor we are to some extent 
parties to the crime resulting from it. With whis- 
ky out of the country we will have little crime 
tjiat amounts ,to anything; for whisky is at the 
l|ottom of all our troubles." 

i ■ ***** 

j | We sometimes think that the evils so much com- 
plained of are of modern origin, but in 1335 Daniel 
"f/ebster is quoted as saying: "There are persons 
■fjb'o constantly clamor. They complain of op- 
pression, speculation and a pernicious influence of 
accumulated wealth. They cry out loudly against 
a-H banks and corporations and all means by which 
s-mall capitals become united in order to produce 
important and beneficial results. They carry on 
Iliad hositilty against all established institutions, 
■yhey would choke the mountain of industry and 
(fry all the streams. In a country of unbounded 
liberty they clamor against oppression. In a coun- 
try of perfect equality they would move heaven 
qrid earth against privilege and monopoly. In a 
dountry where property is more evenly divided 
Man an> where else they rend the air shouting- 
agrarian doctrines. In a country where the' wages 
of labor are high beyond parallel they would teach 
tlie laborer that he is but an oppressed slave." 



POURING IN A LITTLE WATER. 

Sometimes a pump gets too dry to operate su 
cessfully. It fails to bring up the water. In su< 
a case the custom is to pour in the top a litt 
water so as to wet the valve and cause sufficie 
expansion to get the proper suction. A mi 
might stand over an old pump and yank all d: 
and until he is completely worn out physical 
with the effort and still get no water. It will p; 
in every such case to stop long enough to brir 
water from some near-by stream or spring ar 
humor the pump a little. 

This is but a parable of many a pastor vain 
striving to bring something out of a dead and u 
appreciative congregation. He meets them fro 
time to time. The services are perfunctory and ei 
dently without results. His messages fall dea 
and he goes on his way discouraged. He tries 
enlist them in the great missionary movemer 
but,' they stare at him as though he had spoken 
them in an unknown tongue. He tries to intr 
duce system and business-like method into the 
nancial management of church affairs, but th< 
give him to understand that they want none 
the new-fanpied ways in their church, or what 
worse, they let him project his plans, but they fa 
to co-operate and .nothing comes of the effort 
improve things. . , . , 

What is to be > done in such a case? Is it wor 
while for a man to keep yanking away on a crov 
like that? . Will it not pay to put something in 



A'PPEAL TO THE RIGHT MOTIVE. 

| We heard a preacher make a wise suggestion a 
short while ago, when, referring to the motive 
■Which should prompt one to give, he said, "I am 
Jifck and tired of hearing' men from the pulpit sav 
flat if you give, God will give it back to you again 
$i two-fold measure. On that sort of appeal if I 
dould convince the public mind, I could turn all 
tfae money in New York, London, Paris, and all 
tihe great money centers of the world into ' the 
treasury of the Lord." And so he could. Do we 
tho-.v what we are doing when we appeal to the ver- 
Best selfishness in a man in order to extort money 
•torn him for the Lord's cause? We are bringing 
t|he kingdom of God down to the level of a mere 
bargain counter, and we certainly will not be able 
ijo fool a man more than once or twice with sucn 
i proposition. Giving with such a motive, he is" 
sure to find very soon that his . expectations of 
profit have all been in vain, and he will not be 
4isposed to repeat. -.' ' * 

y There is no doubt that the liberal soul shall be 
^iade fat, but the sort of fat here referred to' is 
({hat which comes' to a man • sometimes by reliev- 
uig him of the mammon of unrighteousne s which 
lias; been making, him lean in all those higher seriti- 



ber of the preachers are at work, and these pretty 
days in the latter part of January should give us 
a good start toward a grand and sweeping cam- 
paign in the month of February. 

We urge all to look after the renewals as well as 
new subscribers. It is important that we should 
lot'e". none "of the old list while adding new names. 
""Yiie"'Advocate going regularly into a home will 
do" perhaps more than any other agency to bring 

air°6ui^ J people into intelligent co-operation in all them that will give them the capacity to respoi 
church work. Why should we not endeavor this ..to intelligent effort?. Let the , preacher not fc 
year to place it in every' home? Such a thing is get that to him is committed the t/^ching functk 
not ; at all impossible." If the; well-to-do will help* as well as the evangelistic, and let him not despi: 
a little the poor may be supplied and it would be a the agencies that are at hand to help him in th 
paying 11 'iiives'tment. Will not. all the churches in important phase of his work.-- . . 
ftiem^htfrch conferences this year resolve to place It will pay any pastor to take a whole month, 
at ¥efet';fi ! ve or ten copies of the Advocate in the necessary, or even two months of the year, in g 
hoites^'df those who are not able to take it other- ing from : house to house and persuading his pe 
wise?" fti"£hch cases we are willing to supply the pie to take and read a church periodical, and 
paper at $1.00 per year. We know one man who, supplying them with. such literature of the chun 
for many years/ has Carried a club of five at his- as will make it possible for them to. have some i 
own expense." Who else will go and do likewise?; telligent conception of what the church has doi 

; — ; '„ in the past, is doing at present, and. of what si 

Is planning to achieve in the future. ■ No man a 
possibly have upon his hands a drearier task tin 
that of preaching to churches ths j.ear roun 
where the people know nothing of what is goii 
on, and are making no effort to find out. There 
no hope of improvemnt until the means of educ 
tion and inspiration are brought to; them. The 
will be no response until something is put in 
them. It is amazing that some good, consecrati 
men seem to be content to work among people 
this sort on lines that give absolutely no promii 
of better things. 

Apropos to this the editor of the Wesley; 
Christian Advocate last week said: 

"I knew a pastor some years since who was se: 



~TH*E REVIVAL WE NEED. 

Ever y_ devout reader of the Advocate will agree 
th'at'we need the revival. Everywhere the cry is. 
ready 'to " go ^up in chorus, "O Lord, revive thy 
Avork." "In" spite of 'the enervating effect of worldli- 
nes'S there" is a spark remaining' in many hearts 
ready to be "fanned into a flame under favora-. 
ble conditions. Every wise pastor will eneadvor 
to fan these ^p^rliB. until he sees showers of bless- 
ings falling upon tlie church. 

The revival we heed is one that will save us as 
Christions from a half-hearted service and a half- 
hearted experience. How it would liberate many 
a soul and send him bounding toward the joys of 
heaveii if he would 1 only make up his mind to leave 
all and follow Christ. There are so many who to a charge where there were twenty steward 
have, never fully made up their minds as to wheth- three of whom were subscribers to the church p 
er they would consecrate all Xo the service of 
God. Their affections are divided and they are 
reserving some place still for the gratification of 
self. Such a service can never be a happy ser- 
vice. Rev. Dr. Cuyler in referring to this says: 

"Some are fettered by besetting sins, from 
which they have never cut loose. They have never said, yes. In the course of a few months all b 
made a clean break wMth the old sinful self, or three had paid for the paper. The charge i 
with the beggarly elements of this world; they are creased the pastor's salary more than dounle wh 
hobbled with practices' arid associates that they the charge had paid the year before and more th£ 
have" never cut loose from. They iiave probably doubled all collections. The church paper did n 
passed from death unto life, yet they appear very 
much as ..Lazarus would have looked if he had 
wa lke«fW .streets of Bethany ' in his ghastly 
grave-ciothes.^ This . is a pitiable style of relig- 
ion; 'if; d rings, but little joy to its possessor, and 
gives him or her no power in the community. 
While they are content to be' what they are there 
is no hope" for such manacled profressors. Their 
onjv noge is in ja, timely and thorough repentance, 
and afresh' work of Christ, a tteeper anil thorough 



per. After two months looking over the situatio 
he decided to try to use the church paper, and c 
dered it sent to the seventeen stewards who we: 
not subscribers. After the paper had been goii 
about a month these men began to ask the preac 
er if he had ordered the paper sent to them. P 



do it all, but did much to bring the charge up. I 
it was : in that charge, so it may be in oth 
charges." 

We suggest to many pastors who. will read th 
that they stop how and pour a little water in 
some of the bid dry pumps with which they ha 1 
been so discouraged. We will furnish some 
the water if they will arrange in some way 
have us send the Christian Advocate into tl 
homes ol. some of these unresponsive ones, <■ - - 



January £8, 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATB. 



A BLANK THAT SHOULD HURT. 

We refer to that blank in a preacher's report 
under the head of "accessions on profession of 
faith." As we were looking over the journal of 
our late Annual Conference a few days ago, the 
eye fell upon some of these blanks, and they were 
in the reports of some whom we know to be among 
the very best men in the conference. Men who 
have been known for years to be faithful in their 
work, and who do not idle away their time. Our 
acquaintance with some of these men justifies the 
assertion that no one feels more keenly the sense 
of mortification because of this dearth of results 
than they. 

How are we to account for such a state of 
things? Why should a good preacher labor for a 
whole year with a membership of 200 or 300, or 
may be 500, to help him, and come up at the end 
of the year mortified with the thought that he 
has no souls for his hire? There are, no doubt, in 
all such cases a number of things which conspire 
to bring about the result. In some there are con- 
ditions prevailing peculiarly trying to the man of 
God and which ordinarily preclude the possibility 
of success in the effort to save souls. We will not 
say that there are any conditions under which 
souls may not be awakened and saved; but it is 
far more difficult to preach an effective gospel in 
some places than in others. Any preacher of 
experience will testify to the truth of this, and 
Jesus must have anticipated something of the 
sort, for he told his disciples to shake the dust 
off their feet, as a testimony against a community 
that would not receive them. "The lust of the 
flesh, the lust of the eye and the pride of life" 
effectually forestall the efforts of the best of men. 
Jesus himself could do no mighty work in a certain 
place, it is said, because of their unbelief. The rush 
and craze of society in some places disintegrate 
the very foundations of the church, and the king- 
dom of God is disorganized by the greed and 
worldliness of many who occupy chief places 
therein. Neither Paul nor Appollos, nor any of 
the very chiefest of God's servants could carry on 
effectual soul-saving in such an atmosphere, until 
by the grace of God, they had scourged the money 
changers out of the sanctuary, and enthroned the 
righteous in their stead. 

Nevertheless, is it not true, as we heard a great 
preacher say on one occasion, that the preacher 
must hold himself alone responsible for his fail- 
ure? This may seem cruel, at first thought, yet it 
is true. No man ever succeeds in the highest 
sense who lays the blame on others and allows 
himself to escape on this plea. God has called 
and commissioned his servants to go forth to con- 
quer a gainsaying world. No matter how great 
the hindrances there are none but may be ex- 
pected to vanish before the preaching of a trium- 
phant gospel. How many times we have failed 
because we have not had Nathan's courage to say 
to the offender, "thou art the man." 

Then it may be that we have not taken the mat- 
ter of soul-saving to heart as we should. The 
spirit of Knox was that of the true and loyal min- 
ister of Christ when he felt that he must die if he 
could not see Scotland converted, it will be hard 
to find conditions where the ministry of a man 
like that would not bring about conversions and 
add names to the church roll. There is victory 
in sight in the ministry of a man who feels that he 
cannot live without the tokens of the divine pres- 
ence in the conversion of souls. Let those who 
have been humiliated by this exhibition of an ap- 
parently barren ministry take heart, and deter- 
mine, by the grace of God, that it shall not be 
So again. Thus all the gaps may be filled up an- 
other year and greater blessing may come upon 
the disappointed and discouraged. 



NOTES AND PERSONALS. 



— Rev. John F. Kirk and wife returned to Mocks- 
ville last week lrom Summerfield where they had 
spent a vi-ek among old friends. 

—The many friends of Mrs. Mary T. Hudson 
will learn with regret of her continued confine- 
ment to her room with grip. — Shelby Star. 

—"•A bill to' make South Carolina "dry" after July 
1st, has been introducel into the general assembly 
of that state and indications are favorable for its 
passage. 

— Rev. J. W. Jones, of the Mooresville circuit, 
called last week on his return from Beaufort, 
where he had been spending a few days visiting 
old frknds. 

; — Rev. J. Frank Armstrong, of Bessemer City, 
says his people have entered upon the new year 



with enthusiasm. Brother Armstrong is a gener- 
ator of enthusiasm. 

— Dr. A. C. Dixon, of Chicago, has consented to 
conduct the protracted meeting at the First Bap- 
tist church of Charlotte, in the spring, after the 
Ludkution of the- church. 

—Mr. A. L. Smoot and Mr. A. B. Saleeby, both 
enthusiastic Baraca workers, spent last Sunday 
in Mooresville, where they spoke in the afternoon 
to a good audience at the Methodist Church, and 
organized a Baraca Class of 40 men. 

— Dr. W. P. Ivey, of Lenoir, and his son, Mr. 
Vincent Ivey, who were at the Long sanitarium 
for treatment, have about recovered and returned 
to their home at Lenoir this week. — Statesville 
Landmark. 

— Mrs. F. E. Ross is making earnest effort in 
behalf of Brevard Institute. She is justly enthusi- 
astic for a more liberal policy toward this our only 
industrial school. We commend to all our read- 
ers a careful reading of her appeal in this issue. 

- Mr. and M-s. Rufus Honeycutt left Tuesday 
for Durham. Mr. Honeycutt will enter Trinity 
College to prepare himself for the ministry. Their 
home here has been rented by Marion Morrison. 
The family will reside at Durham until Mr. Hon- 
eycutt finishes his course. — Stanley Enterprise. 

— We regret to learn of the continued illness of 
Hon. R. Z. Linney, of Taylorsville. Last week his 
condition was reported as decidedly worse. Col- 
onel Linney is widely known and recognized as 
one of the very brightest men in the state. We 
sincerely hope he may soon recover. 

— We sympathize with the Odd Fellows in the 
damage of their main dormitory building by fire 
last week. It was occupied by about 140 children, 
all of whom escaped uninjured. The building cost 
between $35,000 and $40,000. The fire is supposed 
to have originated from defective electric wiring. 

— -Rev. George F. Kirby, of High Point, but re- 
cently tranferred to the South Carolina Confer- 
ence and appointed to Blacksburg, S. C, called to 
see us on Thursday of last week. He brought Mrs. 
Kirby to St. Leo's hospital for treatment. We 
regret to learn that Mrs. Kirby has been seriously 
ill for some time and is still perhaps in a critical 
condition. Let prayers be offered for her recov- 
ery. 

— The first quarterly meeting of the Summer- 
field circuit was held at Lee's Chapel, north of 
this city, on last Saturday and Sunday, Rev. Dr. 
Marr, the presiding elder, was present and preach- 
ed strong and ed r\ ing sermons. His sermon on 
Sunday morning was particularly appropriate and 
made a profound impression. Rev. C. P. Goode, 
the new pastor, is making quite a favorable im- 
pression. 

— The pastors of the six Methodist churches of 
Salisbury and Spencer held a meeting last week 
and formed an organization to be known as the 
Methodist Ministers' Association. Rev. S. B. Tur- 
rentine, pastor of the First 'Methodist church, was 
chosen president, and Rev. J. B. Craven, pastor 
Main Street Methodist church, was made secre- 
tary. The meeting was held in the study of Rev. 
Mr. Turrentine. Monthly meetings will be held. 

— The following invitation, which has been re- 
ceived by friends in North Carolina, will be read 
with interest by many subscribers to the Advo- 
cate: "Rev. and Mrs. Clinton Pancoast Moore re- 
quest the honor of your presence at the marriage 
of their sister, Addie Mae Councill, to Mr. Thomas 
William Reese, on Tuesday evening, Frebuary 2d, 
1909, at 8 o'clock, at First Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, Thirty-fourth and Elm Streets, Oak- 
land Cali." 

— On Tuesday evening of last week a rec3ption 
was given to the membership of Washington 
Street Church, High Point, and a large number 
gathered at the church and participated in it. 
There was no formality about it. It was just a so- 
cial evening of commingling and it was good to 
he there. The good music was an inspiration, the 
refreshments delicious, and the fellowship was 
helpful to all who were there. Rev. J. Ed. Thomp- 
son, the pastor, has a strong grip not only on his 
own people but on tha community, and with this 
prestige it is predicted that he will do a great 
work there this year. 

— Rev. J. M. Terrell, of our Brazil Mission, is 
making an itinerary in the Greensboro district. 
On last Friday night he spoke at Centenary church 
to a good congregation. His address made quite 
a favorable impression. His remarks were con- 
fined mainly to the religious conditions prevailing 
in South America. As from all the other mission 
fields Brother Terrell brings the message of trie 
great need of more workers in the mission fields. 



Every missionary is overworked, and has more up- 
on his hands than he can successfully take care 
Ot. t * ' ; * "' 

— Mr. J. Kemp Doughton. a son of ex-Lieutenent- 
Governor Doughton, of . Alleghany/: formerly teller 
In the State Treasurer's ..office, for the past two 
years assistant cashier of the .. People's Bank at 
Winston-Salem, has been appointed state bank ex- 
aminer to succeed F. J. 'Haywood, resigned.-.,-^- 

—Dr. S. B. Turrentine, of the Fitst. MetlKMjjsJfe 
church, preached Sunday . night from, iHeJj^e^ 
11th chapter, 24-27th verges inclusive. -He addse^* 
ed the congregation upon the life. of. Mo ipg^ ■jpij.e. 
of the grandest men of the worldl , gg faith, ^liat- 
undefiable power in man, Moses _was../giabled. tg 
refuse and choose. Here began ,,a bcautifiil,..pra.;, 
tion on the life of the man upon, whose labors.. -a.nd 
whose devotedness to duty lay the destiny, o| 
Israelites. He showed from, .the .}ife_ of Maseeh?, 
importance of motherhood, early trainiug.. ,.thj:o- 
ough preparation. A three-fold^ danger confront^ 
Moses, a life of ease, wealth" and the..aliura.n£a,tg 
oi honor and fame; but he chose rat.ke^4h£.h;y - d.> 
ship of his people and the Creator wiig n 9 . the^, 
rerved. A life linked with Jehovah wou^d u>o.t. g£ 
out in the tangle wood. . Dr., TurrenUue^ wjjp.i^ 
the new pastor of the church, ha's ma.de. a, .splendid, 
impression on his congregation. — Evening. .Post, 
Jan. 12. . . ' '" " 7 , 

— When Rev. W. O. Goode. f was . appgLUed-to 
North Charlotte, at the last. conference,. j Uiere*,w;ia 
no parsonage for him to go to, but -ful^pLta^th and 
expectancy, he went with a glad heart, t^h^york. 
The neat and well appointed new, church ..w'a ; .situ* 
ated in the center of a very desirable lot,,., jaad^it. 
been placed on one side of , the lot, there jrVQuJi 
have been sufficient room lor a parsonage by the. 
side of the church. One man owned ..all. the sur? 
rounding land. Bro. Goode went to /that ma.n, wha 
belonged to another denomiiutipnt and pronpseA 
to swap him a strip of land on .one side fcu^a 
portion on the other, that a . pars.pna.gc. jnjgkjt ^ 
built next to the church. This' man, ' w.hen 
proposition was made replied that the Methodists 
owed him $1,000.00 already .on their new,' '..ctiurcji- 
This was a disappointment to Brother .(^.p.ode^.^u'n^j, 
later the gentleman, continuing .proposed ,tbat .if» 
they would pay him the $V,pOO.fi.O W jWQuldldeeA 
them a nice lot near by and build upon. i.t,,a < .$l,5p.CJt 
parsonage and have it ready for pcqupangy .lyJlfhin, 
thirty days. Brother Goode made khojivn. ilia,- oggfo 
to some friends, the $1,000 was. pai<Uat once, Jji^ 
the nice parsonage will soon be readj.^fp^i.ufijk 
That was a generous deed by. a geiierpus^iian,,.^! 
Brother Goode and his congregation wj.lL .always 
feel grateful to the good man for th.-. gra.ciou^ giffe 

BREVARD REPORT.' . . 0*5" 
Previously reported ... j $H*2.3S> 

Charlotte, Trinity H. M. Bii.&vttis, it&t mail 

Hickory H. M. S. . ■:, . :I . . a*Vn»bwi 250tt 

Mrs. Geo. H. Miles, Greensboro .. . £ 5$$ 

Total ... .-. ...... . .. . ttitiVHf Jbanil .-.flZSilO 

Respectfully submitted, #m « 'Mill 
MRS. F. E. ROSS, Treasurers*'.; 
Greensboro, N. C. . t.->zixz ■ *& i*d V 

, i - i , 'r . r , Sjjj iX H*H 

CAMPAIGN FOR NEW SUBSCRIBERS: 5 ' !i ' 4 
' . ■ •: ha* iziaa* 

Rsport to January 28th, 1909/ *,-'-• Mv ! :;s*ti 

ASITEVlLLE DISTRICT'.' ',' * * ** V * 

Riverside. A. E. Harrison 'VWW&i b»dimf 

West Ashevill -, R. E. Atkinson :,..j 1 ...^-....,.-... VJ ,nil' I'jt 

Total _'JlL_ '__■.' '* 2 

CHARLOTTE DISTRICT.' •" -"- *»« 

Di worth. Rev A. h. Coburn y tin's a A '■;■«■ ^ T ' r- -i ft 

Wad sboro, J. II. West r ___, „ I , , 

Total in? r-.f>;_ 

GKEEXSUQRO IJIiif R.IOT; Mffiow 

Coleridge circuit. R. h. Fruit im* — - ~i— 

Pleasant <Jard n, R. A. Tayibr...J.r...:..:'j.^___.L__::?„ ; r" 
Washington Street , J. Ed. Thompsim,. __-_>__ .i_^ r __ t j4.i. £j;<Qw 
South Main Street, O. P. Ader ' '_ "_ 3 

Total . ^..:.:J:L^..±;1\;:3*? 

MORGAMTON l)t STRICT gJSSS * 1*t 
Cltnside, S, K. Rlclmrdson 

Rutherford College, \V. E. Pvooey.. : 3^ 

Total .:::j>3Jj» 

SALISBURY DISTRICT,. . £OJB tj ? ? 

Albemarle circuit, J. T. Stover , 1. y 

First Church, S. li. Turrentine 25 SBs? \-'-~- 

SHELBY DISTRICT,. * „ * 

Cherryvllle circuit, A. C. Swofford .„. 2.L'..:/:±JL.t±'S.~t^ 

Total... . L_X ! . ; git 

STATESV-IDLE DISTRICT. f»W0fM 

Lenoir circuit, Rev. J. O. Ervin ...... ... 1. 13 . . 

Total tl j*..l£.-:42&* ~li 

WINSTON DISTRICT;' . r , 

Summerfield circuit, C. P. Goode... . 

WalmnCove, C. H. Clyde.. ...' ?i-^.Ci3*L*y' , * a 

Total . . i-fci - 'ft.Ol W nmost 

WAYNE.S.VILLE DISTRICT, ; , .: . 

Wayues'vi le. Rev. J. H. Baruliardt „„_..„..-.„_ l 

Jonathan circuit ! £23%.JCft»i 

Xl,lal - ~— "' 

Grand Total..... ( '« * ' •|fa<M#'"'> l l l » i >«iiall i< 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



Miscellany 



FROM OLD VIRGINIA. 



By Rev. J. M. Rowland. 



"Wasn't that music perfectly grand?" is often 
beard when the people move homeward from the 
temple of God. It may or it may not have been 
for the great rank and file of us these days know 
no more about some of the music some city choirs 
hurl at us than the average Irishman knows about 
what Father So and So is driving at when he 
chews up Latin and spits it at him at mass. 

We realize what we are "up against" in saying 
this say, but this say is going to be said, let others 
assay to say what they may. It may be that ere 
the week is out another parson will be mobbed 
by soloists and the pen that is writing this may 
thereafter stand still, but he will be a martyr to 
a much needed reform. Many times in the last 
decade here and yonder when having gone up 
to the house of God to worship, we have been 
almost elocuted by the choir (To be electrocuted 
or elocuted is an awful fate). And now, ere we 
join the great majority, we want to enjoy Amer- 
ica's boasted freedom of speech and say a say. 

With all seriousness, brethren, we need a re- 
form in church singing. The man who starts it 
may disappear to parts unheard of, and his bu- 
rial may be conducted without his bodily presence, 
but this reform is needed. We are stressed with 
the question of reaching men in the church. Talk 
with the average man and see if he cares to see 
and hear some of our modern church music. To 
him there is no worship in it. Often those who 
produce it, to his knowledge, lead lives far from 
Christian, and knowing this he does not care to 
hear them sing the sacred songs of Zion. And af- 
ter all why should the man in the pulpit and the 
man who prays at the close be expected to lead 
an upright life and the man in the choir who 
sings the holy gospel in those sacred hymns be 
excused therefrom? Some years ago we heard 
a young lady sing in the church choir, "I am thine, 
O Lord, I have heard thy voice, and it told thy 
love to me," etc., when the night before she danc- 
ed half the night away. It is a solemn thing to 
sing Zion's holy songs. Men do not like to hear 
them butchered up in that way. You can fin 1 
unbelievers in the church and often those whoso 
lives do not sing as their tongues. 

My chorister asked me one day if I would not 
like to have a certain fine tenor singer in our 
choir. A splendid young man, but he swears. I 
said, "No, my folks don't want a swearing preach- 
er, and I don't want a swearing singer." 

And then the average man hears much he can- 
not understand. It is sickening to him. In col- 
lege days agone, we heard a maiden sing. It was 
at church whither the worshipper had gone. She 
took her stand before us, rolled her eyes about 
like a cow that had staid overtime in a turnip 
patch, smiled and winked at her beau, touched 
up her bows, patted her two-story pompadore to 
see if the rat was still in his nest, felt of her hair 
pins, belt, shirt-waist pins, etc., over and over 
again and opened her mouth and squealed with 
trembling voice like she was sinking gradually in- 
to ice water. Thus she shivered, quivered, sput- 
tered, writhed and twisted as she served on toast 
Kipling's Processional. We managed to under- 
stand her .when she screamed out, "Lest we for- 
get." And we haven't forgotten, for a man is not 
likely soon to forget the experience of watching a 
woman trying to commit suicide with the double 
treble, for it looked each minute as if her eyes 
would pop out, or a blood vessel burst and we 
were expecting to have to attend the autopsy. Af- 
ter a man works hard six days in a week, be- 
doesn't care to spend the Sabbath under such a 
strain. 

Is it any better to render songs in the church 
that nobody can understand than it is for the 
preacher to speak in an unknown tongue? 

Sometime ago the writer attended a Thanksgiv- 
ing service. A big baldheaded man in the choir 
bellowed out something and some ladies tremb- 
led back at him. His singing was down in his 
eternal regions like the grumblings of Mt. Aetna 
before an eruption. He must have been singing 
"Bullo tone," as he sounded like a bull frog be- 
neath a mud bank. We learned from some one 
that they were singing, "Let everybody give 
thanks," and we did when they quit (There are al- 
ways things for which to be thankful). We sav 



the brother in his office next day, and we recog- 
nized him by his face and not by his voice. 

Once upon a time we went to a missionary con- 
ference. A rich man's choir had been billed to 
give us an hour. The program was printed, whic'i 
was very considerate, for we would never have 
understood what they were driving at had we not 
had the program to go by. The show went on 
while deluded mortals afraid to appear behind the 
times looked and listened as though they under- 
stood. Hard by the church was a livery stable 
where a country steed was spending the night. As 
the choir of the rich man swung out the steed 
heard them and evidently thinking^ he heard the 
echo of his companions from the pasture hills, 
lifted up his voice and neighed, and neighed, and 
neighed. And be it said to our everlasting dis- 
grace, some of us thought this was a part of the 
program, coming from a section of the choir in 
another room bringing up the processional. Dur- 
ing the hour we understood only one expression. 
It was wrung from the lips of a lady who held 
her breath, rolled her eyes and yelled out in one 
long shiver until it seemed like the wail of a spirit 
crossing the river Styx. As she reached the c'i- 
max, she yelled out, "Oh, Lord have mercy!" I 
looked around for the doctor, but could not see 
him, and I didn't know whether to call for a po- 
liceman, turn in the fire alarm, or send for the 
ambulance. When she recovered and went on, I 
tried to calm my troubled nerves by thinking of 
a story I used to hear in the "State of Wilkes." 
Out beyond that land a parson in his round went 
into a home and after reading from the Book, 
knelt him down to pray while the woman of the 
house continued to "string beans." The ever-pres- 
ent and distressingly present small boy, seeing the 
unusual sight of the parson kneeling with his eyes 
closed and talking in such a strange manner, 
stopped his "play and went over to investigate. 
Looking into the upturned face he called out, 
"What's the matter with him, ma?" As we came 
out a tired country man was asked how he liked 
the music. It sounded to him like a mixture of 
"Hark from the Tomb," and "Old Molly Hare." 
"You must not be so green," said the town man. 
"The difference is this," said the country man, "I 
don't get anything out of it, and say I don't; while 
you folks don't get anything out of it, but pretend 
you do." We did not learn what the rich man 
paid his choir to sing, but some of us longed for 
money enough to hire them to quit." 

We heard some Christmas singing. The choir 
impersonated the angels as they sang to the shep- 
herds. If the angels really sang that way we won- 
dered what became of the sheep. If that was an- 
gelic music the .saints greatly enjoyed that time 
when "for the space of half an hour there was si 
lence in Heaven." 

Often times this operatic music takes up so 
much of the time that the preaching of the word 
is crowded out. , The people want forty minutes 
of choir practice and twenty minutes of preaching 
the word, which to this Methodist mind is the 
wrong proportion, for the word of God is move 
important than classical music. 

The writer sometime ago sat in the pulpit with 
a bishop. The choir went on and on as a large 
crowd waited to hear the Bishop. Presently there 
was a lull, and the Bishop turned to me and said, 
"!s this where I come in?" Many a man has 
asked the same question, and doubtless the Lord 
sometimes asks it. 

Now I am not down on choirs and church sing- 
ing. There is church music and church "mu-sick." 
We are pleading for the music. 

There are many consecrated church singers 
who give their talents and a great deal of - time to 
the church singing, and they are to be commend- 
ed. It is with full appreciation for their devotion 
and service, and in their defense this paper is 
written. Church singing, when done properly is 
one of the most important ways of glorifying God. 
Its power of usefulness is beyond estimation. 
Sometime ago the writer attended a meeting and 
heard a woman sing. She bowed her head in 
prayer to God for his spirit, and as she sang the 
light of God was in her eyes. Men, women and 
children listened with damp eyes. Men were 
there in crowds and every soul was lifted God- 
ward. I've just been listening to Chas. M. Alex- 
ander, the world's greatest singer and his wonder- 
ful assistants. The thing above all 'else about 
him is that his voice, soul, and body is consecrated 
to God. He and his assistants pray more over 
their singing than some men do over their preach- 
ing.- And why should a -preacher pray for aid in 
preaching and a singer pray not for power in sink- 



January 28, 1969. 



ing. And if a preacher, who does not know experi- 
mentally the truths of the gospel, is disqualified 
for telling them, why is not a singer, who knows 
not the glorious truths of a holy hymn, disquali- 
fied for singing them? Brethren, we have secu- 
larized our church singing too much. Let us bap- 
tize it with the power of the Holy Ghost and men 
will go to church. A baptized choir and a bap- 
tized pulpit will solve the problem. 

If aught of this seem treason, make the most of 

it. 



HOW GOD LEADS US. 



By Rev. Theodore L. Cuyler, D. D. 



When the children of Israel were making their 
forty years' march from Egypt to Canaan, a mirac- 
ulous pillar of cloud overhung their camp. The 
center of it was fire — a type of God's holiness. 
Around this core of fire was a mass of white va- 
por. That majestic pillar was a token of the Di- 
vine presence, of the Divine protection, and of 
the Divine guidance. In the morning when Israel 
was to move onward, the cloud gathered itself up 
into an upright column, and pioneered the way 
in which Moses was to march. In the evening the 
cloud halted, and hung like a colossal lamp over 
the host in their vast encampment. All that the 
Israelites had to do was to watch the cloud. It 
was their infallible guide over an untracked and 
an unmapped wilderness. 

We may sometimes envy those pilgrims of the 
desert, who were only obliged to look out of their 
tents each day in order to learn whether thev 
were to remain quiet or go ahead; and if they 
were to move, knew just whither to bend their 
steps. But our God is as truly with us every hour 
of our life-journey as He was with the children of 
Israel. He will be our guide even unto death. We 
have an infallible Word of God as a lamp to our 
feet and a light upon our pathway; and in dark 
hours of bereavement what a cheerful gleam it 
pours into sorrowing homes and hearts. The best 
proof that my Bible is God's book is that it has 
a clear "thus saith the Lord," over the path that 
leads to Heaven, and a most distinct "thou shalt 
not" over the gateways that seem very inviting, 
and yet lead downward toward hell. As the night- 
watchman beside a railway track swings his red 
lantern in token of danger, so our loving God 
hangs out a red light of prohibition and of warn- 
ing on every road to ruin. One of the prime dut- 
ies of every faithful pulpit is to turn God's signal 
lights on the tracks of human life. Not only does 
every Christian have his Bible as the rule of his 
faith and practice, but he has the peculiar help 
and instruction of the Holy Spirit Christ's prom- 
ise is that He will thus, guide us into all truth. 
In addition to this, he has the example of Christ 
Himself. "Follow me," means go where you can 
have my presence and my blessing; and where a 
professed Christian cannot carry Christ and a 
clean conscience with him, he has no right to stir 
one step. 

But the infallible Word and the promised help 
of the Holy Spirit, and the teachings and exam- 
ple of our Lord and Savior are not all that 
we have to direct us. There is also what we may 
call the pillar of Providence. We sometimes talk 
about "special providences," because we can de- 
tect the leadings of God's hand more clearly than 
at other times; but the whole government of God 
in regard to every one of us is a complex series 
of special oversights and orderings. Sometimes 
the workings are complex; just as in a watch, the 
wheels move in opposite directions, but the one 
mainspring drives them all, and on the dial-plate 
we read the meaning of the movements. It has 
always been one of the delights of my life to 
study the leadings of this pillar of providence - 
and I can discover God's hand in every important 
step of my humble history as plainly as see yon- 
der moon shining into my window. Each one of 
these steps turned on what seemed at the time, a 
small pivot. 

It has not been my habit to open my Bible 
when in great perplexity, and to take the first text 
I lighted on as a direct answer from heaven; and 
yet sometimes a single text has flashed on me like 
a lantern suddenly held out over a dark road. For- 
instance, I was once in long and perplexing doubt 
whether I ought to accept a call to a distant city. 
I happened to open a favorite devotional volume, 
and my eye rested upon this passage: "Changes 
in life are often full of danger; 'wherefore gaddest 
thou about to change thy way'?" That text-~ 
which I had never noticed before — settled me. I 



January 28, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



5 



declined the call, and have been thankful for it 
ever since. 

We must observe that the important thing with 
the children of Israel was to keep their eye on 
the movings or the restings of the pillar of clou'l. 
They did not move it; it simply moved them. Now 
a Christion who would be happy and useful and 
successful in his spiritual life must be an open- 
eyed servant of his Lord. . He must come to his 
Bible not to read his own preconceived opinions 
into the Book, but to bring God's teachings ont 
of the Book. "Looking unto Jesus" will always 
give us light. We must be open-eyed in our 
seasons of earnest prayer to discover what re- 
sponses our consciences give; for the Holy Spirit 
works on a good conscience as the noon-day sun 
does on a sea-captain's quadrant. Especially must 
we keep our eyes open and clear and "single" to 
watch the leadings of Providence. Does the cloud 
move? Then pull up tent-pins and be ready to 
go where it guides you. Paul was the only mis- 
sionary who had the Divine direction to his right 
field of labor. A Christian, too — whether pastor 
or Sunday school teacher or parent — who longs to 
save souls, must be on the constant lookout for 
opportunities. I fear that lost opportunities will 
cast a shadow on the golden pavement of Heaveu 
with more than one of us! Finally, let us waU/a 
for the cloud, and walk by the cloud of God's wise 
and loving guidance. Study the Book; study 
Christ; and study Providence, and you will sel- 
dom make a mistake in life. God will show you 
by the way He leads you whither He wants you 
to go. The pillar of cloud will only be needed un- 
til you and I get to the Jordan. On the other side 
of the parted river is the flashing glory of the 
New Jerusalem! March by the cloud till you 
reach the crown! — Christian Observer. 



HELPFUL RULES. 



Rev. James Mudge, D. D. 



Should there be rules in religion? We say, yes. 
A perfectly holy life is the result of careful plan- 
ning and ceaseless watching; of deliberate, de- 
termined, systematic effort. This is the way ;>.!1 
Important things are compassed. Method and per- 
severance are of as great value in acquiring right 
habits as in acquiring material riches. The char- 
acter which shows consummate serenity and ease 
of . movement or symmetrical development has us- 
ually been built up by long, patient continuance 
in well doing. It is only by strict attention to 
rule for a good while that one reaches a place 
where rules can be dispensed with and what 
seems like spontaneous goodness be exhibited. 
Daniel's regularity in prayer had much to do with 
his reliability in an emergency. The spirit, no 
doubt, is more than the form, but in most cases 
it needs the form, even as the containing cask 
is necessary to the preservation of the precio is 
liquid. We append, therefore, in compact com- 
pass, a score or more of simple rules which have 
been proved helpful in the conduct of the Chris- 
tian life. 

Make everything — even the smallest matters, 
and the hardest — a means of spiritual improve- 
ment. They will either help or hinder our growth 
in grace. Aim not so much to get rid of troubles, 
as to get rich by them; they can not be spared. 

Extend, in your thought, the scope of God's will 
to the more minute matters of -momentary occur- 
rence, and insist on an increasingly exact con- 
formity to that will in your life. This will fur- 
nish a magnificent and practically inexhaustible 
field for progress. 

Steadfastly aim to have always more humble 
thoughts of yourself, more kindly thoughts of 
your fellow men, and more trustful thoughts of 
God. 

Pick out a few of the very finest, richest hymns, 
and repeat them daily, drawing from them new 
sweetness and strength with each repetition. Or 
use one for a. whole week, until it is wholly com- 
mitted and absorbed; then select another for the 
following week. 

Take some single great truth, or text, or coup- 
let, and see how perfectly you can embody it in 
your life for a single day. 

With the hours as they strike, with the trains 
as they go, with the horses as they pass, connect 
some holy thought, some pious ejaculation, which 
shall, the closer join you to God. Let everything 
you see lead you to the Lord. 

Prove the preciousness of Jesus, and test your 
attachment to him, when you can not do extra- 
ordinary things for him, by doing the common 



things, more especially one thing each day, with 
an uncommon amount of love thrown into it, and 
a very particular purpose to please him perfectly 
in it. 

Take time to be holy, for holiness can not come 
otherwise, nor can time be better spent than in 
this direction; but one exceedingly profitable way 
to take it is by using in meditation and aspira- 
tion those scraps and shreds of time which are so 
frequently lost or wasted, but may be turned to 
excellent account by letting the soul stream up to 
God in prayer or praise. 

Be silent concerning the wrongs and slights and 
contempts you meet with. Brooding over them, 
or seeking comfort from others, is weakness, and 
pretty apt to do harm. 

When temptations come, do not stop to attack 
them directly, but look away to Jesus, and pass 
on to your work. Replace the evil thoughts with 
good ones; the less attention the dogs get the 
quicker they will stop barking. 

Aim to be a symmetrical Christian. It is true 
you cannot equally excell in all directions, but 
you can correct your main deficiencies, and this 
is a large part of life's task. 

Arrange to get a full spiritual meal from suita- 
ble devotional exercises, every day, if possible. 
If this can not be compassed, make sure at leav.t 
that Sunday furnishes it, lest the soul utterly 
starve. 

Take all things from God, and do all things for 
him; it is the only way to lead a truly sacred life. 

Pause a second before taking any action, to 
make sure that you are in just the right spirit, in 
close touch with the Master, and seeking primar- 
ily his glory. 

Form the habit of using your pen or pencil in 
your devotional reading, to concentrate thought, 
to formulate purpose, to preserve materials for 
subsequent review. 

Cultivate a devout practice of speech, avoiding 
those careless, current expressions which shut out 
the active agency of God in affairs, whether it be 
the weather or the changes usually attributed to 
"luck," "chance," and "fortune," good or bad. It 
is a pity to lose the opportunity for practical 
witnessing and glorifying God with our lips. 

Be found as little as propriety allows in circles 
where Christ is not named, and where the tone of 
your spiritual life will inevitably be lowered/ Seek 
companionship with those who will aid you in bet- 
ter living, or whom you car; aid. 

Guard, diligently, vigilantly, against leakage in 
spiritual strength and religious resources. It is 
lack of attention to little things — all of them slight 
and seemingly insignificant when taken separate- 
ly, but mighty in combination — which brings in 
the tides of indifference and death. 

Keep open the channel of supply from above — 
believing prayer — so that the nutrition of the soul 
may be always going on. 

Watch not your superficial feelings, which vary 
with bodily conditions, but watch the indications 
of God's will, and the promptness with which you 
follow them, for this latter is the . test of your 
spiritual progress. 

Build your happiness on the unchanging God, '.f 
you would lift it above earthly casualties; and 
use the test of uninterrupted happiness to indi- 
cate to yourself and others whether you are lean- 
ing on the creature or the Creator. — Ex. 



RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. 



By Bruce Craven, in American Education for 
January. 



Education without morality is as hopeless as 
a mariner without a compass. To separate mor- 
ality from religion is as impossible as to separ- 
ate moonlight from sunlight. The basis of non- 
religious morality can only be the concensus of 
public opinion; hence to be moral, one would be 
obliged to change his habits with the shifting of 
sentiment. This would be to accept as a guiding 
motto the misleading maxim: "Honesty is the 
best policy." A school governed by this motto 
trains the children to be honest so long as it is 
policy to be honest, and then — what? If we teach 
them to be honest from policy, to walk the 
straight and narrow path for what they can make 
out of it, we teach them to be governed by policy 
What then will they logically do when they think 
it js policy to be dishonest? Is not this godless 
doctrine at the root of the corruption of the day? 
When the schools surrender to it, they encour- 
age, when they should with all their strength op- 
pose, the mammon of unrighteousness. 



Honesty is a principle and the only good policy, 
in the final analysis, is to act from principle. Let 
us teach the child to be honest from his own 
sense of righteousness — through the agency of his 
own conscience. The only reliable source of in- 
spiration for this conscience is the Word of God. 
That Word therefore must be made the fountain- 
head of all teaching. It is the revelation of God 
to man. It was not intended for literature and 
should not be studied in the schools aa literature, 
the tenth of the declaration of principles (so- 
called) of the National Educational Association 
to the contrary notwithstanding. That declaration 
admits that the Bible should be in the schools, but 
says it should go as literature "alongside of poetry 
and prose," and not as God's Word. Thus the 
children would be taught to study the Word of 
God while shunning God, which would be as sensi- 
ble as telling a thirsty man to look upon the 
beauties of Niagara and be satisfied. 

This is compromising the most sacred of all 
things. Such a course will degrade the Bible in- 
stead of lifting it to the place in education it 
should rigidly hold — as the headstone of the cor- 
ner. The Bible is not "merely theological" nor 
merely literature, and every child should be 
taught to go to it for guidance In everything and 
at all times. There is not a detail of education 
that does not center around conduct and if the 
child have no criterion but policy, he cannot be 
expected to become anything but a sneak and a 
grafter. He instead should have God, Christ and 
God's word for his criterion and he could then be 
justly expected to become a godly man and good 
citizen. Objection will be made that this teach- 
ing should not be given in the school, but in the 
home or in the church; the answer is that thi3 
teaching or its opposite is absolutely inevitable 
in the school where every activity of the mind and 
soul is being developed. Also it will be argued 
that the teacher cannot speak of God or Christ 
and the beatitudes without imparting sectarian 
doctrine, but this is a reflection on the teacher's 
intelligence and not on the declaration: "For 
other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, 
which is Jesus Christ." And would you not pre- 
fer that your son should be a consecrated com- 
municant of any Christian church than that he 
should be ungodly? If the child is taught that 
the Bible is "merely literature," the man will in 
active life ignore it entirely because he can find 
more agreeable literature; and this low estimate 
of sacred things is the source of private and pub- 
lic dishonor. We need a real God and not a mere- 
ly incidental one. 



IS GOD PLEASED? 

By Rev. A. D. Betts. 
He says (Lev. 19, 13): "The wages of him that 
is hired shall not abide with thee all night." Ke 
says (Deut. 24, 15) : "At his day thou shalt give 
him his hire, neither shall the sun go down upon 
it." 

James speaks of the cries of those whose hire 
is kept back by fraud. 

Now suppose! A tired widow sends in my wash- 
ing at sunset. She tells her little boy to run by 
the store and get some bread for her hungry chil- 
dren. I tell him to run on home and I will send 
the money tomorrow. Is God pleased? 

Suppose! While the blacksmith shoes my horse 
I go into a store and pay seventy-five cents for a 
bundle of cigars. Just as I trot away, smoking, 
his little boy comes and says that his mother 
wants meal for the family dinner. The black- 
smith "charges me up" and goes out to hunt for 
bread. Is God pleased? 

Printers and editors work very hard. Their fam- 
ilies, wives, and children must have food, clothing, 
and shelter. Suppose! I subscribe for my church 
paper. I read and enjoy it. It is a great help to 
my children. Time runs out. I let it come month 
after month. The publishers tell me they need 
money. I do not send it. Is God pleased? 

I believe God is displeased with several hundred 
subscribers in North Carolina. They ought to bor- 
row money at interest to pay up. 



THE ONE THING. 

There is a starting point for every soul, a day 
when Jesus is pointed out, when God's messenger 
cries, "Behold the Lamb of God that taketh away 
the sin of the world." There is only one thing to 
do in that hour, and that is to follow Jesus. 
Thence forward, that is the whole business of life 
here. So, following Him, we shall be with him at 
last — "Forever with the Lord." — Dr. S. E. Wish- 
ard. 



i 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 28. 1»:»9 



.XMo-'i t< ~'S K$li<\ ii si 



* 9J From The Field. 

ttWO «f rf {Soil 

ntlf lo '{OfES^'a ■ 



Shelby* Orstrict Conference. 



On this day the facta about the 



SoUhSo Siielby ;District Conference school, the design, the aim, the op- 

,wirli«be:he!d at Mt. Holly, June 24-27. portunities for the poor girl, and we 

,?T51s :i\ill\;98lbvace the fourth Sund.iy hope soon to say the poor boy also, 

Sn-r. Junem?Ehe announcement is ma.e and also its needs. More room both 

.*h,iSJ.ear:ty ;:tahat u.o ,oth£r district con- in the campus and building is need- 

■ ferciKMj-jlna-y. co.ue on this date. ed, sorely needed. We do hope now 
,-;;Js.--^ • ' : '.:>o;"C. F.': SHERRILL. that this plan being formulated and 
r.<si'.< : ' v 1 J '." — — — voted on by you at the conference 
?N6tj;e. • pi',; means that you are going to do your 
-■-.I have secured J. J. Matney as best for this "foster child" as Mrs. 
■.'•pireacher fbr<: Hayesville circuit. Copeland calls it. 

.•Krdtfc'OK Matney comes to us from We hope you will plan great 

■ thav-M)i:©j Church, And is well recon- things and that the collections will 
^lfebndcd. 1 Moreover, he is of preach- be good, and we can go forward and 



ins stock. 



R. M. TAYLOR. 



help this school to much greater use- 
fulness. 

Yours in His name, 

MRS. F. E. ROSS, Treas. 
Greensboro, N. C, Jan. 25, 1909. 



"Hsywecd Circuit:- 

•*MKI •'■fffle'd- my ' first'' appointment on 

? this "work January 3, 1909. The peo- 

'-■pie ofi/this charge -have made a pro- Granite Falls. 

'HaanftS'trnpressiori on my mind as he As a transfer we were assigned to 
Miig a generous and hospitable people, work with this clever and loyal peo- 
"'The good brethren and sisters have pie. Landing here on the afternoon 
"b : eGn;;poundmg''as from time to time of January 1st, we were met at the 
AYfatyk wet-have received the second, station by a number of the people 
? ■ thircfci'.'and , 'fourth blessings in this and conducted to the parsonage 
"way: ''- fc!«io3 ' where we found everything in readi- 

i While' «0' got' a -late start, we be- ness for the new preacher and his 
-Iiwe the: outlook is hopeful for a family in fires burning brightly and 
opVorpe fad's .'ycai: We desire the pray- 
ers 6*.'31h-the brethren. : 
ritiiJitv 'jtR'sspectfuHy, 
?z& halm »ffj So -r, c. kirk. 

irtS'g'tS R'v — ! ^— - ! ! 



a sumptuous dinner . spread. The 
good women of the church had 
spared no pains to make everything 
comfortable and pleasant and they 
succeeded. 

.'Hsffflej?' Memorial Baracas. To our surprise we were again vis- 

/!'-T4i6' , Bai'aca Class of Holmes Mem- ited at night by such a great number 
'■driat <V'ClTufchv Salisbury, has just that our house was "full and ruu- 
"cfosed .^m'-'nery ' prosperous year'3 ning over." These made it pleas- 
,HvOi"kV ?*S?fe 'have a faithful band of ant for us and we could but feel that 
•WBblfe'-«metr.- &rha have been doing "The lines are fallen to us in pleas- 
tlflhgs' tMs-^Tsear. ' The' most impor- ant places." And such a pounding' 
?tant- ; ;4hiri!gi''acgbiKplished was the er- One dear little girl asked, "Did they 
-■"etflioff'fof ■a^iiew Baraea class room hurt him much?" Well, it was heavy 
'adjb'rnhfg-'our church. The room is and all ages (from tiny little boys 
-'Targe'* iuftt- commodious, and is one and girls to "silver-haired men and 
' ; 6f 'th'S^be^t' in the' city. It has benn women) took part in it. For all of 



by April 1st of each year. Each ap- 
plication so approved must have the 
action of the conference board writ- 
ten therein, certified by the president 
and secretary, and all the applica- 
tions from a given conference must 
be by the Conference Board graded 
and marked in the order of their rela- 
tive importance, and the secretary is 
hereby directed not to put on the 
calendar any application not in con- 
formity with this rule." 

We trust that, except in the most 
extraordinary cases, no demand will 
be made upon the board for aid in 
payment of church debts anywhere 
unless it be to avert imminent and 
otherwise inevitable disaster in the 
loss of church property. Let all oar 
people remember that church exten- 
sion means aggressive movement — 
the multiplication of houses of wor- 
ship, which is essential to the pros- 
perity of the church and the goo.i 
of the land where we work. 

The demand upon the Board is 
greater than ever before in its his- 
tory. The increased receipts are not 
equal to the increased demand. Wide 
sections of undeveloped country are 
open to us. A little timely aid here 
and there will go far toward laying 
the foundation of what is to be a 
great church in the near future. If 
the brethren of the older conferences 
will keep in mind the obligation of 
the church the wide open doors, es- 
pecially in the southwest, and as far 
as possible care for their own build- 
ing enterprises without calling upon 
this Board, we will be able, in some 
degree, to do the work so urgently 
needed and so essential to our life 
as a church. 

W. F. McMURRY, 
Cor. Sec'? 

707 Chestnut Street, 
Louisville, Ky. 



Stanley Creek. 

Lest we be thought to be ungrate- 
ful to the good people of Stanley 
Creek circuit, we beg leave to ex- 
press through the columns of the 
Advocate, our appreciation for tne 
many kindnesses we have received 
at the hands of these good people 
since our arrival in their midst. 

On New Year's day the people of 
Stanley Creek remembered us with 
a bountiful "pounding" consisting of 
good things too numerous to mention. 
On Monday, 11th inst, Brother J. C. 
Puett drove up with a wagon literal- 
ly loaded with pounds from the con- 
gregation at Dallas. These, with 
many other material expressions of 
love and respect make our hearts 
glad and assure us that we "snail 
not want." 

Everything seems promising and 
we are hoping for a good year. Our 
people are planning some improve- 
ments on the parsonage which we 
are sure will add to the comfort and 
convenience of the preacher. Thuy 
will at an early date do away with 
the surface well and sink a drilled 
well on the parsonage lot. 

We hope to be able to send in a 
list of "new subscribers" to the Ad- 
vocate, together with the renewals ot 
all the old ones soon. 

Pray for the Stanley Creek circuit 
and its humble pastor, 

B. WILSON. 



■fiiftHt^at a -sacrifice, and will stand as 
• "monument to - the zeal and loyally 



which we are devoutly thankful. 
These are loyal Methodists, ami 



of the members of the class. With have given us a royal reception. The 

this new equipment we are expecting footprints of our predecessors are in 

to do better work, "in the future. Our evidence, in that they have wrought 

membership is '■ growing, interest in well. We can only hope to reap 

•the se&6i$ Us: 'JttfcTeasing, and we face where they have sown. . 



»tne neiWriiyear' With" faith and hope. 

3:*tf» : JAfc Bjy H. COOK, 
.'•'••?•.,-•* ;•;'•»"<;.. ■' ;;. s«3 "."■': - Reporter. 



More anon, 
W. FRANCKE SANDFORD. 

Church Extension Aid. 

'Ftutherford College. The annual meeting of the Board 

Brother J. M. Terrell spent Sui.- of Church Extension will be held 

''da^f January 10th, at Rutherford. At April 29-May 1. Many inquiries are 

11 "fcV<:16ck ^he preached a strong ser- reaching the office concerning the 

On* "The Debt of Christendom to the church extension aid. It is well for 

''Not-Christian 'World." At 2:30, be- all interested to know that applica- 

fore the Y. M.' C. A., he delivered an tions to the Board must be made up- 

' address on" 'Brazil. Brother Terrell on printed form furnished by the cor- 

"is^a force fnl and earnest speaker responding secretary. The annual 

"afffdt ' we" expect to have him with us conference boards have blank forms 



agairi: 



3td 



for the use of applicants, but they d.f- 



'* 'Tuesday night, the 19th, Dr. Tnr- fer from those used by the general 

"r entitle delivered an address to the board. Do not get one of them and 

students on "Some Fundamental try to change it to suit. The appii- 

' Prfnciples rasi Should Guide in the cation blank, which may be had for 

ASftolce of a Life- Work." The ad- the asking, explains itself. After it 

Sress wag pointed, practical, and has been properly filled out it must 

^stimulating: .* We are getting great go to the secretary of the conferenc e 

' gb8<r from these/ a'dclresses which run board of church extension In order 

mfbugn the year. ' Dri Boyer is en- that the following rule may be com- 



gaged for March. 

•m at w ; E- poovey. 



plied with : 

"Every application for considera- 
tion at the annual meeting of the 

— — General Board must first receive the 

To Members of the Western N. C. approval of the Board of Church Ex- 



Conference. 

Dear 'Brethren:— In this week's Ad- 
vocate T see the "Conference plan" 



t^n^icn of the Conference from 
■vhieh it comes, and said approval 
must be given at a regular meeting 



Tor Brevard Institute, as. told by Mrs. of said Board or its Executive Com- 
T/' J.' Copeland,' Conference Secre- notice held in the month of March. 



*tarV Woman's Hone Mission Soci- Said Poard or Committee shall con 

* ear 



Si'der all the applications from their 



r*sea that .(fie ."first Sunday in respective conference and forward 

such as they approve so as to reach 
the Board's office In Louisville, Ky., - 



March Is the 'day sc( apart as "Bre- 
vard Institute day." 



Subscriptions to the Endowment 
Fund of Greensboro Female Col- 
lege. 

Previously reported $77, 588. SO 

E. E. Gray 25.00 

D. C. Moir 25.00 

T. S. Waggoner 25.03 

N. D. Sullivan 1,000.00 

Cash 712.77 

Cash 100 00 

Alumnae Association 847.40 

F. S. Lambeth 1,000.00 

W. T. Smith 25 00 

Dr. C. W. Banner 100.00 

J. S. Carr 2,500.00 

J. C. Smith 50.00 

J. C. Harmon 10."0 

J. A. Porter 10.00 

C. W. Mangum 100.' 0 

Wm. D. Avera 25.00 

Thelma G. Webster 1.00 

Cash 1,000.00 

Jno. S. Huyler 500.00 

6 per cent, note signed by 72 

persons in the W. N. C. 

Conference 7,500.00 

6 per cent, note signed by 50 
persons in the N. C. Con- 
ference 7,500.00 

Total $100,444.'j7 

The Methodists of the State have 
a right to rejoice over the fact that 
?100,000.00 has been subscribed co- 
ward an endowment fund for Greens- 
boro Female College. 

Of this amount $35,000.00 is now 
in hand. Letters have been sent to 
all subscribers asking for the pay- 
ment of their subscriptions. Many 
have already responded, and we hope 
that all will do so very soon. It is 
necessary for us to secure $75,000.00 
in "cash or marketable securities," 
that we may get the $25,000.00 from 
Mr. Carnegie. 

W. M. CURTIS, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 



Our Washington Letter. 

After a pleasant vacation of sevsr- 
al weeks with his friends in Ashe- 
ville ai d other points in Western 
North Carolina, your correspondent 
has returned to his post of duty at 
the national capital. 

At this particular season of the 
year social functions in Washington 
are among the chief attractions and 
at present such occasions, especially 
at the White House, are well attend- 
ed by the diplomatic corps, senators 
representatives, judiciary, army and 
navy and others. 

For many months past the temper- 
ance forces of this city have been 
exceedingly active in their efforts to 
secure temperance legislation during 
the- present session of Congress, but 

ADVO— EIGHT 

the committee in whose charge this 
measure was placed has voted al- 
most unanimously to assign the Sims 
bill to the pigeon holes to sleep with 
many other good measures for which 
the people have asked in vain. 

The Southern States New Year re- 
ception which for six or eight years 
has been held regularly on New Year- 
evening was largely attended this 
year, as on former occasions. The 
programme was interesting and en- 
joyable, as was also the refresh- 
meirts. The social feature of the 
evening will long be remembered by 
the Southern contingency in this 
city. ; . 

W. F. TOMLINSON. 

The Hillside, 1415, Chapin St., n. w. 



Walnut Cove Circuit. 

This is a new circuit, but the breth- 
ren are working together harmoni- 
ously and seem determined to make 
it one of the very best in the confer- 
ence. We have six .churches, one 
here at the parsonage, and the other 
five at as many different points of 
the compass near by. 
, The parsonage is being overhauled 
and refurnished, and the people and 
the preacher in charge are moving 
off in good spirits. 

Two notable events have occurred 
recently: Rev. J. M. Terrell, re- 
turned missionary from Brazil, gave 
us a splendid lecture here and Brotn- 
er R. B. Crawford from Winston, one 
of our leading laymen, went with the 



January 3?,, 1909. 



NORTH , CAROLINA CHRISTIAN AOVOe^E. 



preacher On one of his Sunday tion,. the payment of all arrears,, and 

rounds to three of the . churches, and a fee of one dollar, 

told of this great" laymen's move- Article 8. In the event of the deatn 

ment. this we belive to . be the of the Treasurer, the President shall 

movement, in earnest, for this is take charge of his books and all 

reaching the .people. The laymen funds on hand, and shall discharge 

of this district are trying to reach the duties of said office until the en- 

every nook and corner with the light, suing annual conference, when the ot- 

Brother Crawford - gave us a good flee shall be filled by vote of the 

talk and left, we believe, lasting im- Brotherhood. 



KM 



WWW 



Article 9. Membership in the Broth- 
erhood shall not be forfeited except 
in case of immorality, or non-pay- 
ment of assessments and annual 



pressions. We hope that his example 
will be followed by many other?. 
Come again, Brother Crawford. 

C. H. C. 

Since writing the above we have dues, 
been pounded by our Bethesda breth- Article 10. This constitution can 
ren. It was unique in that it was en- be amended at annual sessions; pro- 
tirely unexpected, and came all at vided, the amendment proposed 
once in a box full i, of good things, by shall have been published in the con- 
freight. We wish to express our grat- fereuce Advocate at least tvyo weeks 
itude , for' these little things do - so before said conference session, or 
much to cheer, hearten and make us by vote of two-thirds of the members 
do our best. Of course we feel that present in annual session, 
a warm welcome awaits us at Beth- 



esda, and we are anxious for our 
time to go back to them with the gos- 
pel. C. H. C. 



By-Laws. 

Section 1. The President shall 
sign all certificates of membership, 
— and perform the duties usually re- 
Western North Carolina Conference quired of a presiding officer; and, in 
Brotherhood. cis absence, his duties shall be per- 
Article 1. This Association shall formed by the Vice-President, 
be called the Western North Car.o- Sec. 2. The Secretary shall keep a 
Una Conference, M. E. Church, South, record of the proceedings of the 
Brotherhood. Board of Directors and of the Broth- 
Article 2.- The officers of this As- erhood, and perform the duties as- 
sociation shall be a Presidept, a Vice- ually required of a secretary. He 
President, a Secretary and Treasurer, shall, upon the notification of trie 
together with three lay and two cler- death of a member, communicate the 
ical members, all to be selected an- fact t0 the surviving members, noti- 
nually at the conference session, who ir™S them to forward the mortuary 
together shall constitute a Board of fe e to the treasurer. 
Directors to superintend the affairs Sec. 3. The treasurer shall receive 
of the Brotherhood. The offices of and care for all the funds coming co 
Secretary and Treasurer shall oe the Brotherhood, and shall disburse 
held by one person. or i nves t the same as directed by the 

Article 3=' Art- annual meeting of constitution and by-laws, 
the Brotherhood 'shall be held" during Sec. 4. The officers shall receive 
the sessi&»-of» f ttie' Annual "Confe> no remuneration, except the seere- 
ence, at such time' and place as may tary and treasurer, who, in view of 
be designated' 7 By 'the President. the labors imposed upon him, may 
Article 4. Any minister or lay be exempted from the payment of as- 
member of the ' Methodist E. Church, sessments and dues. 
South, within the bounds of the Sec. 5. No certificate of membor- 
Western North - ; Carolina Conference ship in the Brotherhood shall be as- 
may become ' a" beneficiary member signed, transferred, or in any man- 
of the Brotherhood by the payment er pledged as security for debt, 
of an initiation -fee of $1.00, and $1.00 -ec. 6. Any expense other than 
anuual dues, - from which fund all provided for already, shall be met nv 
necessary expenses of the associa- special appropriation of the associa- 
tion must be-' paid ; provided,, said ap- tfcm in annual meeting. 

plicant presents a certificate from his 

family physician stating exact condi- I present the above as an outline 
tion of health, and the association In of a constitution that will meet, as 
annual session, or the Board of Di- far as I know, the views already ex- 
rectors in interim of annual session, pressed. It is a benevolent associa- 
: passing upon same. \ tion, no salaries, only actual ex- 

Article 5. On the death of a cler- penses to be provided for. It will 
: ical member each surviving clerical help laymen also who are in moder- 

• member shall be assessed $2.00, ate circumstances, while both lay 
; and each lay member $1.00; on the and ministerial members will help 

• death of a lay member each surviv- one another. Any one touched witn 
ing lay member shall be assessed a spirit of pure benevolence, esre- 
$2.00 and each clerical member cially to help the families of miuis- 

', $1.00; to be paid into the treasury ters of limited salaries, and superan- 
within sixty days from the date of nuates, could not object to the plan 
notice of assessment. The whole above outlined. If any one conceives 
( amount collected shall be paid to the any item better than, or other than, 
I person or persons, or object, desig- above set forth let him speak at 
\ nated in the certificate of member- once. I am willing as long as I can, 
' ship. or am with you, to do the work tor 

Article 6. Any funds coming into nohting. 
'■ the Brotherhood (mortuary assess- In an old Brotherhood which ran 
ments always excepted) shall be in- 10 1-2 years, we had 20 deaths — aver- 
vested by the Treasurer, and the in- aging two annually — and amount 
, terest solely .used as a supplement- paid in benefaction $7,5S8.00, or an 
'} ary fund to increase the mortuary average of $379, an assessment. Was 
■ benefit, or expense' of the association., any individual hurt by it? No. No 
this article not applying to initiation one felt it. Of these, seven were sup- 
fees and annual dues, which are pro- erannuates; four were young men, 
vided for in Article 4. ; and nine in and beyond middle life. 

Article 7. A member who shall fail At an average annual expense of 
to pay any assessment due as afore- $6.00 each, each member carried an 
said, within sixty days from dace insurance of nearly $400.00. The 
of notice, shall forfeit membership in highest death benefit paid was $437.- 
the Brotherhood; provided,- that any 00, and the lowest, $361.00. 
under this article shall be re-admil- If 150 clerical members will join 
ted to the Brotherhood upon applim- and 300 lay members, this will giro 



Uneeda Biscuit 

What makes them the best 
soda crackers ever baked? 

What makes them the only 
choice of millions ? 

What makes them famous 
as the National Biscuit? 

National-Biscuit-Goodness— 

Of Course ! 




Sold only in 
Moisture Proof 
Packages 



NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY 





a clerical certificate of' $600.00, and 
a lay certificate 1 'rJf R! $750.00. If 200 
clerical will ' join" and 600 lay that 
will give a' clerical certificate of 
$1,000.00 and' a" lay of $1,400.00. 

Now if these extremes can be ad- 
justed amicably between the lay and 
clerical, with the last named mem- 
bership, we could give each a certifi- 
cate for $1,200.00 and no one would 
be hurt. What do our clerical and 
lay brethren say? 

Additional Names. 

Revs. R:'B ; . Sherrill, E. G. Pusey, 
J. R. Scroggs, J. C. Troy, N. M. Mod- 
lin, P. E. Parker, 'W. L. Sherrill, H. 
M. Blair, J. J. Edwards, A. T. Bell, 
Geo.' D.' Herman, Mrs. Geo. D. Her- 
mon, r ' ; Mrs. W. V. Honeycutt, C. M. 
Campbell, E. N. Crowder, W. S. Cher- 
ry. ,1. B. Carpenter, E. Myers, W. ?■. 
Hales, T. S. Ellington, J. H. Robert- 
son, W. W. Bays, J. M. Downum, A. 
J. Price, J. D. Hemby, W. A. Short 
and D. Atkins — total 27 ; grand total, 
34. 

Those returning to us from the 
Methodist Benevolent Association, I 
do not think, should pay initiation 
fees, but should pay annual dues. Mo 
when we get a sufficient number, the 
annual dues will be called for, and, 
as some have suggested, it would be 
well to call for one asses~ment, to 
have on hand for the first call. A '.1 
this subject to agreement. 

" H. F. CHREITZBERG. 

PLANT SETTING SOLVED. 

If our readers want to set their cab- 
bage plants and their tobacco and 
sweet potato plants at less than ha'* 
the cost, of doing this work with the 
old peg method,' then let every man 
of them write to the" Masters' Planter 
Company, of Chicago, whose ad. you 



will find in another column of this 
paper, and they will get a catalogue 
of the slickest little machine ever 

seen for many a day. , 

Farm help is getting scarce, ajnd 
hard to obtain. This setter will nujve 
than double the amount of work ev- 
ery day than the best man you can 
hire, and will do better work.. Ev- 
ery farmer who has plants to set out 
this coming spring should investi- 
gate this Rapid Plant Setter, as the 
inventer of it is a large practical 
caboage grower in northern Michi- 
gan, where he has set out over two 
million cabbage plants with this., lit- 
tle machine during the past few . sea- 
sons. 

They ray you can depend upon 
this plant setter to be the ideal tool 
you have been looking for. . and in 
times of a drought, when you can- 
not set at all by hand, this little ma- 
chine is guaranteed to set s your 
plants without the loss of five plants 
per thousand during the dryest kind 
of weather. This planter is ju~;t as 
neces-ary on every well managed 
farm as the spade and the hoe. Don't 
wait a minute,- but write these people 
for full particulars, as their ad. may 
not appear again in this paper. 



TETTERINE IS RECOMMENDED 
FOR ECZEMA, RINGWORM. OLD - 
SORES, RISINGS, ETC. -. " 
MTvin. Ala., August 1, 1908. 
J. T. Shuptrine, Savannah, Ga. 

Dear Sir: — I received your Tetterine 
nil O. K. I have used it fir E z ma and 
TVtt"r, ninpTWO'-ms, old sires, and rts- 
fhjrs and can gladly recommend it as a 
sure cure. 

Yours truly, .1. R. D'Brile. 

Tetterine 'pureS Eczema. Tetter. Ring 
Worm. Ground Itch, Infant's So~e PT.-Ad. 
P-'mpl 'S, Bolls. Ronsrh Scalv Patches .on 
the Face, Old Itohirg Sores. Dandruff, 
Cankcr.-d Scalp. Bunions, Corns. Chit- 
hlairs. and evcrv form of Skin Disease. 
Tett'-ine Tile. ; Tetterl'io Soap 25*. Your 
druggist, or by mail from the manufac- 
turer. The Shuptrine Co.. Savannah; Ga. 



8. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



Jauuary 28, 19;.'9. 



The Christian Life. 



AFTER THE NIGHT, THE DAWW. 

He must not be dejected nor oe 
spalr; but calmly remain, awaiting 
the will of God, and bear for the glory 
of Jesus Christ whatever shall befal 
him; because after the winter com 
eth summer; after the night, the day 
returneth; after the storm cometh a 
great calm. — Thomas A. Kempis. 



A STEP IN TIME. 

In accomplishing your day's work 
you have simply to take one step at 
a time. To take that step wisely is 
all that you need to think about. 1 
I am climbing a mountain, to look 
down may make me dizzy; to look 
too far up may make me tired and 
discouraged. Take no anxio.is 
thought for the morrow. Sufficien' 
for the day — yes, and for each hour 
in the day — is the toil or trial there- 
of. There is not a child of God :'r 
this world who is strong enough t( 
stand the strain of today's duties an 
all the load of tomorrow's anxieties 
piled upon the top of them. Paul 
himself would have broken down i 
he had attempted the experiment. We 
have a perfect right to ask our heav- 
enly Father for strength equal to the 
day; but we have no right to ask Him 
for an extra ounce of strength :.'oi 
anything beyond it. "When the mor- 
row comes grace will come sufficient 
for its tasks or for its troubles. 
"Let me be strong in word and deed, 

Just for today! 
Lord, for tomorrow and its need, 

I must not pray." 

— Theodore L. Cuyler. 



GOD LOVES YOU. 

Weary, tired, gloomy, glad or cheer- 
ful, look up and smile. God is lo"P 
God loves you. Think over ther-se 
things with something more than 
thoughts, one told me. 

"God is more near to our souls than 
our own bodies." 

"The Lord thy God is in the midst 

ADVO— FOUR 

of thee, a mighty One who will save: 
He will rejoice over thee with joy; 
He will rest in His love; He will joy 
over thee with singing." 

"A root set in the finest soil, in the 
best climate, and blessed with all tha 
sun and air and rain can do for it 
is not in so sure a way of growth tc 
perfect as every man may be whost 
spirit aspires after all that God is 
ready and infinitely desirous of giv- 
ing him. For the sun meets not the 
springing bud that atretcheth towarc 
him with half that certainty as God, 
the Source of all good, communicates 
himself to the soul that longs to par- 
take of him." 

"Be quiet; look up; back to God 
His love smile. We are all of us the 
offspring of God, more nearly related 
to God than to one another, for ii 
Him we live and move and have our 
being."— Rev. J. T. Wilds, in Obser- 
ver. 



"Glorify the room!" was Sydney 
Smith's way of ordering the curtains 
up, and the obedient glory brimmed 
his page with laughter-punctuations. 
Dickens was another who wrote his 
stories with curtains up and sunshine 
streaming through the study. "Re- 
joice!" was the old Greek's sunshiny 
way of greeting a friend. "Laugh un- 
until I come back!" was Father Tay- 
lor's good-by to Dr. Bartol — parsons 
both. Carlyle, in his dyspepsia, look- 
ing up at the stars, could groan, "It's 
a sad sight!" But the little girl look- 
ed up at the same sight and said, 
"Mamma, if the wrong side of heaven 
is so fine, how very beautiful the 
right side must be!" 

This habit of looking on the laugh- 
ter side can be learned. Ask any 
person who has won his cheer, the 
secret of his victory, and he will quice 
likely tell you a story, of some dark 
day when he vowed he would see the 
sunshine. Lydia Marie Child, a wo- 
man well acquainted with trial, has 
left it on record: "I seek cheerful- 
ness in every possible way; I read on- 
ly chipper books, I hang prisms m 
my windows to fill the room w:th 
rainbows." 

Remember Emerson's mudpuddle: 
"But in the mud and scum of things 
There alway, alway something sings." 

Remember Luther on his sick-bed. 
Between his groans he managed to 
preach on this wise: "These pains 
and troubles here are like the type 
which the printers set; as they look 
now, we have to read them back- 
wards and they seem to have no 
sense or meaning in them; but up 
yonder, when the Lord God prints us 
off in the life to come, we shall find 
that they make brave reading." Only 
we need not wait until then. — Rev. 
W. C. Gunnett. 



LOOK ON THE SUNNY SIDE OK 
THINGS. 

Should some down-hearted friend 
suggest that to try to see the good h 
his lot is like trying to extract sun- 
shine from cucumbers, remind him 
that sunshine is just what make on 
cumbers, and that accordingly it can 
be extracted from them. Few may 
know how to do it, but the lack is 
not in the vegetable. There is sun 
force in all things. Connection is di 
rect between the light that pours n 
at the window and that which shines 
in eyes, and smiles, in tones and man 
ners and in thoughts. In all its trans 
formations it is the heaven-force. 



how canst thou contend with horses? 
And though in a land of peace thou 
art secure, yet how wilt thou do in 
the pride of Jordan?" 

This is one of the uses of adversity 
— it is a training ground of charac- 
ter. Not at random, we may be sure, 
has our Father chosen the time and 
place of this experience. Why should 
we ask to have it postponed, claiming 
a present hour of ease at the cost of 
grievous future loss? No more seri- 
ous and urgent question can we ask 
ourselves than this — Do we desire to 
be trained by God's methods in His 
school? If we do, we shall be willing 
also to pay the price of present self- 
denial and suffering. 

Our sorrows and deprivations are 
necessary also to the progress of the 
race. How many of us hold our 
places in the world-order as if we 
were owners in perpetuity instead of 
tenants at will. We cannot imagine 
the world without us, although it 
went on for a long time before we 
came and will go on easily enough 
when we have departed. There is 
said to be an American man of wealth 
who refuses to speak or hear the 
word death. He is like the French 
king who lived as if he were only tje 
world's center, but also its eternal 
occupant. God teaches us the lesson 
of our own brief tenure in taking 
from us, one after another, those 
whom we know and love. With ev- 
ery loss there comes a still, small 
voice in our hearts saying, As these 
were, so also thou shalt be. The with- 
drawal of the death angel would be 
the signal for the stagnation of the 
world. Our strength and consolation 
are that we are related to the eternal 
forces and called to heroic lives of 
duty in God's companionship. There 
can be no destroying shadow for him 
whose life is hid with Christ in God. 
— The Congregationalist. 



LIGHT IN THE SHADOWED 
HOURS. 

Who would be content with an ab- 
solutely unheroic life? Yet heroism, 
for many if not most of us, consi?ts 
in cheerful endurance, rather than in 
deliberate venturing upon unknown 
and dangerous ways. Our training 
for the needs of new adventure comes 
from this familiar experience of cour- 
ageous bearing in the hours of trial. 
Not to whimper, not' to cringe, never 
to listen to the voice of despair, nev- 
er to make our burden an addition to 
the loads of other burdened men, to 
follow the gleam in darkness, to hold 
to God in grief, to obey with no rea- 
son when the law is made plain — he 
who can walk thus through the shad- 
owed way is arming himself for high 
adventure and great service. Shall 
we, like visionary children, neglect 
our present opportunity in looking 
for one which is higher, grander and 
better advertised? A lifetime spent 
in such a futile childishness is not 
the lifetime of a heroic soul. 

The shadowed hours reveal the in- 
ward light of courage and of hope. 
A lighted lamp is little noticed in 
full daylight, its opportunity comes 
with the dark. Then how we welcome 
it and use it for all the purposes of 
life! There is nothing remarkable 
in good cheer when the light is shin- 
ing on the way and all goes well with 
journeying. The Valley of the Shad- 
ow is the true test of our attainment. 
Until we have known an acquaintance 
in time of trouble, we cannot be sure 
of his real worth as a friend. Until 
we have measured ourselves by the 
test of the difficult hours, we have 
no claim to an established character. 
"If thou hast run with the footmen, 
and they have wearied thee, then 




THE 



OUTHERN" 
ROOFIHCXO 



outhern 



Climate demands our "Dixie 
Bran 1" Roofing. For 40 years 
we have studied the QUALITY 
necessary to cope with the heat 
of the "Sunny South," and have 
male our brands the most suc- 
cessful sold In the United States. 
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Box2L 



ATLANTA GA. 



REGRET 

does not abide in the home 
where is always a bottle of 
finwan's Preparation. It 
Cures Colds, Croup, Pneumo- 
nia. External. All druggists. 



CURED!* 0 CURE "o^- 1 " 



other words you do cot 
ff" I I .Ir^^ Pfcy oarsman prof »B8lonal fee until 

■ ■ ■ ^■^cured and satisfied. »3arm«n- 

■ AimrlDin Institute, 24Q Walnut St. . Kansas City. Me. 



CHAS. W. MOSELE Y, 3£C. D. 

Practice Limited to 

Diseases of Stomach and Intestines 

Opposite Guilford Hotel 
OVER FARISS-KLUTZ DRUG CO., 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Office Phone 571 * Residence 1345 
Office : 221 S. ELM STREET. 

Hours 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
2 p. m. to 5 p. m. 



I do believe in simplicity. It is as- 
tonishing as well as sad how many 
trivial affairs even the wisest man 
thinks me must attend to every dav; 
how singular an affair he thinks he 
must omit. When the mathematician 
would solve a difficult problem he 
first frees the equation of all incum- 
brances, and reduces it to its simp- 
lest terms. So simplify the problem 
of life, distinguish the necessary and 
the real. Probe the earth to see where 
your main roots run. — Henry David 
Thoreau. 



FROST PFOOF 



CABBAGE 
PLANTS. 

GUARANTEED TO S/ TISFY PURCHASERS 



Price: 1,000 to 5,000 at $1.50 per 1,000; 
5,000 to 9,000 at $1.25 per 1,000; 10,000 
and over at $1.00 per 1,000. Our cata- 
logue gives full instructions for grow- 
ing all kinds of fruits and vegetables, 
and mailed on request. Wm. C. GER- 
ATY CO., The Cabbage Plant Men, P. O. 
Box, 670, Young's Island, 6. C. 



Believe me, the world is a mirror — 
it reflects back to you the face you 
present to it, and you get out of the 
world just what you put into it. If 
you make no effort to let it know 
what you have done it makes no ef- 
fort to find out what you have done. 
Is not this the just working of the 
law? If you make no action, there 
will be no reaction. If you do not 
sing out, can you get an echo? — Dor- 
othy Quigley. 



To be angry about trifles is mean 
and childish; to rage and be furious 
is brutish; and to maintain perpetual 
wrath is akin to the practice and tem- 
per of devils; but to prevent and sup- 
press rising sentiment is wise and 
glorious, is manly and divine. — Isaac 
Watts. 



Men do not object to a battle if 
they are confident that they will have 
victory; and thank God, every one 
of us may have the victory if we will. 
— D. L. Moody. 



La Grippe 
Bad Colds 
Neuralgia 



\ 



Cured by using Johnson's 
Chill and Fever Tonic. 

The difference between 
a Bad Cold and La Grippe 
is this : 

A strong constitution 
will wear out a Cold, but 
Grippe will wear out a 
strong constitution. 

Don't take chances — 
take Johnson's Tonic. 

Made by The Johnson's 
Chill f n ' Fever Tonic Co., 
Savannah, Ga. 

25 and oO cent bottles. Trial 10 cent 
bottles sent on receipt of stamps. 



Every gift of God implies the duty 
of using and increasing it, of mak- 
ing it tell in the world. — Selected. 



Steel Alloy Ctrnrch and School Bells, tysend foi 
Catalogue- The C. 8-, BBUL CO., Hllljbtrt.O. 



January 28, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



5. 



Our Little Folks. 



CRACKED. 

'Twas a set of Resolutions, 

As fine as- fine could be, 
And signed in painstaking fashion, 

By Nettie and Joe and Bee. 
And last in the list was written, 

In letters broad and dark 
(To look as grand as the others,) 

"Miss Baby Grace X her mark!" 

"We'll try always to help our mother; 
We won't be selfish to each other; 
We'll say kind words to every one; 
We won't tie Pussy's feet for fun; 
We won't be cross and snarly, too; 
And all the good we can we'll do." 

"It's just as easy to keep to them," 

The children gaily cried: 
But mamma, with a smile, made an- 
swer, 

"Wait, darlings, till you've tried." 
And truly, the glad, bright New Year 

Wasn't his birthday old, 
When three sorrowful little faces, 

A sorrowful story told. 

"And how are your resolutions?" 

We asked of the baby, Grace, 
Who stood with a smile of wonder 

On her dear little dimpled face; 
Quick came the merry answer 

She never an instant lacked, 
"I don't fink much of 'em's broken, 

But I dess 'em's 'bout all cracked! ' 

— Selected. 



BIRDS SEEN IN JANUARY. 

A daily four-mile tramp out into the 
country in midwinter has proven to 
me that one may find much- bird life 
astir at that season of the year if his 
or her eyes are open to discover it. 

One mild day in January I was 
passing along the road when my at- 
tention was attracted to a large bird 
that had just lit upon the topmost 
branch of a leafless tree. It looked 
like a flicker; and when, after rest- 
ing a moment, it spread its wings m 
flight, the golden glory beneath theri 
unmistakably proved its identity. 

Two weeks previous, as I was walk- 
ing briskly along the same road, I 
saw a plump, well-groomed robin dili- 
gently seeking to unearth a worm 
• from ist winter quarters in a near-by 
field, evidently a belated or an un- 
willing migrant. 

Chickadees were as numerous as 
bees in a summer field of cloven. 
Sometimes a cheerful "Chick, chick, 
chick," denoted one's presence in a 
roadside tree; often a merry "Dee, 
dee, dee," made known its proximity, 
and occasionally a happy little fellow 
would give his black-capped head an 
upward tilt and bubble over in a rol- 
licking, jubilant "Chickadee-dee-dee ! " 

The diligent hammering of busy 
woodpeckers was no uncommon 
sound; while an occasional nuthatch, 
the woodpecker's sprightly cousin, en- 
tertained me with his wonderful gym- 
nastics as he darted up or down some 
tree trunk. 

Crows, singly and in flocks, soared 
in midair or walked like stately gren- 
adiers over the frozen ground of some 
sun-warmed meadow, and in harsh 
crow jargon discussed the weather or 
quarreled over some bright bit of 
grass or other object picked up in 
their wanderings; while a little far- 
ther on a screaming blue jay chal- 
lenged the right of a venturesome 
squirrel to scurry up its favorite tre^. 

One morning a peculiar and to me 
an altogether unfamiliar sound in a 
pine tree caused me to stop to inves- 
tigate; and there, right above my 
head, I discovered my first little 
crossbill friend. He was diligent'y 



snipping a pine cone, while his mate 
was doing all sorts of stunts by 
means of its parrotlike cross bill, 
which gives the bird its name. The 
pair were particularly friendly, and 
it seemed almost possible to take one 
of them in my hand. They afforded 
me every opportunity to examine 
their funny little bills which give 
them a decidedly freakish appear- 
ance. 

Down in a sheltered spot under a 
hill I surprised a flock of fifty or more 
juncoes sunning themselves among 
the bare branches. The surprise 
seemed to be mutual; for I might not 
have discovered the little creatures 
except for their excited twittering 
and flight at my approach. 

Goldfinches in their winter suits 
of brown and olive dipped and swung 
in the air above me and brought to 
mind the little balls of yellow loveli- 
ness that later on would flit and sing 
through the sun-warmed air of spring. 

A genuine bird-lover, I am con- 
vinced, finds almost as much to inter- 
est him among the leafless trees of 
winter as among the leaf-embowered 
branches of the summer months. For 
some unaccountable reason birds are 
not so shy in winter, and will fear- 
lessly pose upon bare twigs and fence 
rails, and do all sorts of gymnastics 
for the benefit of the onlooker. It is 
true that there is not the variety that 
spring lavishes upon us, and our win- 
ter orchestras boast no musical notes 
than those of the merry chickadees; 
but when the hills are bleak and bare 
or snow-crowned, even the sharp 
"quank" of the industrious nuthatch, 
the scream of the lordly blue jay, or 
the harsh outburst of the omnipresent 
crow is a welcome sound. — The Visi- 
tor. 



FATHER KNOWS. 

A gentleman was one day opening 
a box of goods. His little son was 
standing near, and as his father took 
the packages from the box he laid 
them upon the arm of the boy. 

A young friend and playmate of 
the merchant's son was standing by, 
looking on. As parcel after parcel 
was laid upon the arm of the boy, 
his friend began to fear his load was 
becoming too heavy, and said: "John- 
ny, don't you think you've got as 
much as you can bear?" 

"Never mind," answered Johnny, 
in a happy tone, "father knows how 
much I can carry." 

Brave, trusting little fellow! He 
did not grow restless or impatient un- 
der the burden. There was no dan- 
ger, he felt, that his father would iay 
too heavy a load on him. His father 
knew his strength, or rather the 
weakness of that little arm, and 
would not overload it. More than 
all his father loved him and there- 
fore would not harm him. 

It is such a spirit of loving trust 
in him that God desires all his chil- 
dren to possess. — Sunday School Ad- 
vocate. 



SECURITY. 



The largo capital and conservative management of this bank afford 
absolute security for all money entrusted to its care. 

4<y° Interest on Savings Deposits. 

We cordially invite your patronage. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE BANK. 

CAPITAL, $300,000.00. 

E. P. Wharton, President. U. O. Vattohn. Pushier. 

J. W. Soott, Vice Pretldent F. H. Nicholson, Assistant Cashier. 

J. W. case. Manager Savings Department. 



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GREENSBORO, N. C. 





Johnnie. "The wind will play with 
us. We can go out and fly a kite." 

"I'd like to know how you can f y 
a kite if you have none," said Robert. 
"Kites don't grow on trees; it takes 
money to buy kites." 

"But we will make one," explained 
Johnnie. 

In a short while the pretty kite was 
finished, and the boys went out on 
the vacant lot to send it up in the 
air. After a few attempts, it slowly 
rose on the wind like a huge bright 
bird. The boys ran down the strt-et 
unwinding more string as they went, 
At last a bright smile broke over 
Robert's hitherto cloudy and discon- 
tented face. 

"O, isn't this great sport?" he cried. 
"And aren't we having a good time?" 

And Johnnie laughed in great glee. 
—Child's Gem. 



THE IRON DONKEY. 

Bicycles are very strange things in 
Africa. The children chase after mis- 
sionaries who ride them, shrieking 
with delight. Amid yells of laughter 
they cry: "Look at the iron don- 
key!" Some of them call it "the road 
engine," "the ghost," or "the bird." 
Often the people will follow the mis- 
sionary as he rides along. When they 
reach the mission house or some 
shady tree, he will get off and talk 
to them about the love of thir hea- 
venly Father. So you see that the 
"iron donkey" helps to spread the 
good news. — Selected. 



ALWAYS SMILE AND TRY. 

"Come, let's go out to play," said 
Johnnie, with a bright little smile. 

"We have nothing to play wita," 
complained Robert. 

"O, but we will find something!" 
replied Johnnie. 

"My goodness, I would like to know 
how any one can play when they nev- 
er have anything to play with!" 
grumbled Robert. "Besides, the wind 
is blowing outdoors, and we can't 
play in the house.'* 

"O, I know what we can do!" said 



FINE POLAND GHINA 

. . AND . . 

MAMMOTH BLACK 

PIGS 

READY TO SHIP 

Order Before They Are Picked Over 



John A. Young 

GREENSBORO, N C. 



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can increase his income in a good, benevolent 
work ; not a book , not agency business. Write 

THE COLUMBIAN WOODMEN 

122 Peachtree St. Atlanta, Ga. 



Little Susie had always been deep- 
ly interested in mechanical toys, and 
numbers several among her choicest 
possessions. Recently the family cat 
having apparently eaten something 
which disagreed with her, began a 
mad race around the room, leaping 
chairs and turning somersaults. Su- 
sie's mother, much frightened, seized 
her small daughter and mounted a 
table. But Susie remained unscarecl. 
Clapping her hands in glee, she shout- 
ed, "Wind her up again, mamma; 
wind her up again." 




COPtRI.OHJ 



[iMSURANCE 

0. W. CARR & COMPANY, 

Office: McADOO BUILDING 

(Next to the Post Office. 



Tom, aged five, accompanied his 
father to church one cold Sunday 
morning, and upon their return his 
mother asked if he could repeat the 
minister's text. " 'Course I can," re- 
plied the little fellow. "He got up 
and rubbed his hands together and 
said: 'Many are cold, but few are 
frozen.' " — Chicago News. 

FOR SALE 

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1U 



N O U TL1 CAJtQ/JXA CHRISTIAN APVOCATK. 



January 38, 1909. 



Woman's F. M. Society: - A — to for the M °"- Di * ri <*- 



Conducted by Mr». L. W. Crawford, Win»ton-3»lem, N. C. 



Name of Charge 



THOSE FROM THE LANO 
OF SINIM." 

On distant .shores of Slnim 
Wakes 3 throng 
ro;n blackest night ot sin, 
Stirred by a song 
One who gave his life! 
^ That men might live. 
They seek to know if unto them 

He'll freely give 
This life eternal, which 
The song has told, 
"O, ehephera of the lost, lead them 
Into thy fold." 

—Ralph Welles Keclcr. 



Current events can be made a fas- 
cinating part of a monthly .program 
if a member is appointed in advance .t; ., 

P Mount Aliy s.allou.. 

to bring in "Watch Tower" items, or .Klkin ■fttttloni 

whatever you may choose to call 
Uh m. There are so many interest- 
ing things happening! Do you know 
how many thousands of dollars/ 
worth of rich robes and costly jewels 
were burned in connection with the 
funeral observances of the late em- 
peror of China? Do you know wh( re 



N . Wlltteshoro station, 

Wllkednr > station 

RockftSG Circuit 



Watauga Circuit 

Boone Circuit 

Vadklr|vllle Circuit .. 

Ml. Airy circuit. 

Rural liull Circuit... 



Wilkes Circuit 

Jetfe sou Circuit 

Kast Bend Circuit 

Crestoti Circuit 

the American fleet is, on its journey Bitot Mt. Circul 

hon:e,\ard from the Pacific? Do you sparta circuit ... .. 

, .. . , ., . . Itclton Circuit .. 

know the terms of the American- 



Japanese agreement, and wljat o tr 
United States Senators think of it? 
Do you know how many students 
China proposes to send here eajh 



A recent number of The Intercol- 
logian contains an exceedingly sug- 
gestive and well "written article by 

a new recruit on "How It Feels to year, and where the distinguished of- 

Be a Missionary.;',,. Did space permit, flcial-, who brings China's thanks for 

we would like to quote the article the return of the Boxer indemnify 

entire; we must confine ourselves, received his education? Do yoa 

ho ,vevcr, to' the closing paragraph, know what President Rooseviit 

After stating the negative side of thi thinks about China? Do you know — 

matter — that such ideas as being a but if you do not, read the recent 

feiartyr, being raised suddenly to a numbers of the Outlook, the Inue- 

grcat height of spiritual po.ver, be- pendent, the Review of Reviewaj'<CAtr> 

ing a superior sort of perron, are rent Literature, and the daily papers. 

jeliminated Soon after arriving upon ■ rj 

ithe field — the author continues: "Let a man take care that the cir-.^ 



Jonesvlllo Circuit ... _, 

Danbury Circul 

Laurel Springs Circuit. 



a. 

1 
_i 


So 

a e 

^ a 

<i « 

9 a 


M O 


Missions 


Church 
Extension 


■5 
u 


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u 


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JS 
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c 


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s 

a 
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m 

©J 

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s 


80 


117 


1117 


130 


75 


.80 


mp 


12 


0 


SC45 


8216 


20 


80 


110 


00 


50 


55 


15 


6 


4 


480 


1*2 


19 


71 


100 


80 


40 


50 


15 


6 


H 


MO 


128 


10 


40 


55 


45 


26 


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7 


5 


2 


•.'15 


70 


12 


40 


03 


60 


31 


28 


7 


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238 . 


85 


10 


40 


60 


'45 


26 


30 


7 


6 


2 


225 


70 


10 


40 


60 


. 45 


26 


80 


7 


6 


2 


. 225 


70 


10 


40 


55 


45 


25 


26 


7 


5 


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215 


70 


10 


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65 


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26 


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215 


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10 


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63 


44 


24 


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4 


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208 


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87 


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7 


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200 


70 


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86 


48 


40 


23 


28 


6 


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190 


70 


8 


82 


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21 


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6 


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2 


175 


65 


8 


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45 


35 


21 


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6 


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175 


55 


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85 


21 


23 


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175 


55 


6 


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35 


25 


17 


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135 


■ 40 


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18 


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21 


12 


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100 


35 


5 


18 


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21 




12 


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100 


35 


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85 


30 


210 1 928 


1174 


9:ifi 


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570 


155 


80 


43 | 4556 


1500 



J. F. HENDKK.V, Secretary District Stewards 



Assessments 1909, Waynesville District. 



Name of Charge. 



lirevard «tat on 

Can on Stat ion ...111' 

Waynesville.... • ... . 

West Ashevllfe 

Sulphur Springs ..r i. 



"What one does feel may be sug- cle of his petitions grows wider 'ev- jnu 3 eS | t i 'jver~ 



Clyde. 
Hay woo I _ 
Jonathan. 



Total . 



'gei ted in two words, Work and Fei- cry week. The pathos and the trag 

Ibwjghip. It is unceasing labor, edy in many Christian lives is this: 

Whether it be the man in a lonely their prayers are no bigger today Bethel 

station who has to' cobble his own than they were twenty or thirty *«a»*s i*°L tb Haywood. 

. . iry^fr Spring creek 

shoes or the man in the large cen- ago. Spiritual hospitality is^o^'ch- Brevard circuit. 

ter who has to carry a heavy finan- er; there are no more guestSy ; ta l; th«ir 

jcial and administrative burden, the hearts. Prayers of that^nd] .become 

trefrain is the same — work. The field very stale, for a man ipust lje/;qn,\e 

is terribly undermanned, the need is weary of the same company from day 

filiTialling, .opportunities are on every to day and from year to year. Let 

Stand, and; time is short. Men are Mm give himself a surprise by intro- 

'compi lied to a life of real labor, and ducing an outsider into the holy eir- 

lit is o life of joy. The question is cle, some neglected vagrant.', who 

!nnf, 'Can I or my organization do rarely comes within the, petitions of 



j Bishops. 


*i 
S° 
§3 


Foreign 
Missions. 


— _o 

c£ " 
£^ 
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Expense. 


Minutes. 


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8 15 


3 59 


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$ 3 $ l> 


$ 280 


3 10) 


15 


52 


41 


66 


38 


33 


• 6 


3 


6 


2ro- 


100 


20 


93 


39 


86 


56 


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160 


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354 


370 


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2975 


1005 



the saints. Let Christians scour the 
world for needy people, and let the.ii 
bring them under the influence of 
mighty intercession." — Rev. 3. II. 
Jowett, in the Congregationalist. 



No nobler words could be taken as 
our own for the new year than these 
of David Livingstone: "I place no 
value on anything I have or may 
possess except in its relation to the 
Kingdom of Christ. If anything I 



fhall most promote the glory of f Him 
to whom I owe all my hopes, both of 
time and eternity. May grace be 
given me to adhere to this." 



jihis better than any other?' but it is, 
"Csn I not add a little more to my 

daily schedule so that this work can 

b • done at all?' And it is one of trie 

greatest joys in life to be hard at 

work in a place where work is so 

much needed. The impression on 

returning to America is that of a be- 
wildering array of organizations wita 

money, science, and consecrated lives 

behind them, working to uplift me l, 

so that it seems as if no man need 

be sucked down into the whirlpool have will advance the interests of 
of sin. Out on the foreign field tne that Kingdom, it shall be, given up 
sources of, evil are intrenched and or kept, as by giving or keeping I 
powerful, jsien are falling by the 
thousands, and the hands sfretc'he i 
out to help, are bql pitifully few. that 
it is -a source of keenest satisfaction 
to work where tlje need is so urgent. 

"And it brings 'a new meaning to 
the .word fellowship. In the face of 
the need, .confronted by the blank 
wall of age-long .established custom 
and an indifference whose very iner- 
tia is appalling, a man in literally 
driven on .his knees to God. The 
task is hopeless for man, and no 
mortal power can accomplish It, and 
the only hope is in the great flood 
tides of God's inexhaustible resourc- 
es And being driven to him in thi; 
way, there j is the sweetest sense of 
communion; and fellowship. In 
America so much of success in num- 
bers and strength can be secure! 
for my movement by sheer unceas- 
ing labor that many men do not 
know the , sweetness and reality of 
a helplessness which drives one -.o 
God. It makes the hardest day seem 
bright, it turns the keenest disap- 
pointment into encouragement, an 1 
it. r'n,v-"te- the bitterness of humilia- 
' tion of self into the joy of victory for 
the Master," . 



fief: 

7t.<-> : 



and It still is, an edifying sight to see relation possible. What more can" 
the completeness of the Samaritan's you be asked to do than to love tho^e- 
attentions-^-to see him kneeling with you have to do with? It is that which 
the interested, anxious eye of a friend alone will enable yoa to fill all Wiiy ' 
by the side of the Jew, gently rais- to them. You need not ask, What 13 
ing his head, cleansing his wounds, due to this man or that, how' -tnucii . J ; 
mollifying them with oil, binding service, how much assistance, how ' 
them with strips torn from the the much substantial help? These are 
first thing that came to hand, restor- very useful questions where there l? 
ing in him the grateful desire of life, no love, but they are never sufficient, 
and greeting his return to conscious- and they are therefore all summaril/ 
ness with the strength-giving congrat- dismissed by Paul in his brief ruH;, 
ulations of genuine affection. We 'Owe no man anything, but to love 
might suppose he had now done one another,' — that is the one debt 
enough. How is his own business to always due, never paid off, always re- 
go forward if he thus delays? But newed and that covers all others, 
love is not so soon satisfied. He sits You are meant to live happily arid 
by him till he is strong enough to be strongly and sweetly; the relations 
set on his beast, and does not resign of society part to part are meant to 
his charge to any other. He does net move as sweetly as the finest machia- 
feel that the robbed man is oft his ery, and love alone can accomplisn 
hands when he has got him to an inn. this. It is a mere groping after har- 
He. : has himself to go on his journey, mony and order and social well-being 
but be will not on that account, nor that we are occupied with while « r e 



God has done all, and I nothing. 1 
have worked hard, that is all; and 
I have never refused God anything. 
— Florence Nightingale. 



try to adjust class to class, nation to 
nation, man to man, by outward laws 
or defined positions." — From "The 
Parables of Our Lord." 



There is, a place in Christ's army 
for every soul that belongs to him, 
and a r.pot on the battlefield where 
each soldier is needed.— Van Dyke. 



The world belongs to him who 
wills and loves and prays; but ae 
must will he must love and he must 

pray. — Balzac. 



on> any account, disconnect himself 
from the man; he will disconnect 
himself from him only when he needs 
no more assistance. This Is love s 
way. To be asking, How far am 1 
to go in helping others? shows we 

have not love. To be asking, To We shall find that the love of na- 
what extent must I love? Where can ture, wherever it has existed, has 
I stop? Whom can I exclude? and been a faithful and sacred element 
From what sacrifices may I reason- of human feeling; that is to say-, sup- 
ably turn away? is simply to prove posing all the circumstances ofher- 
that we have not as yet the essentiai wise the same with respect to two in- 
thing, a loving spirit; for love asks dividuals, the one who loves nature 
no such questions, but ever seeks for most will be always found to have 
wider and wider openings. more capacity for faith in God than 

"This, then, is our Lord's answe- the other. — Ruskin. 



That land is henceforth ray coun- 
try which most needs the gospel.--* 
Count Zinzendorf. . , ,. : :a 



THE LOVING SPIRIT. 

Dr. Marcus Dods, in a sermon ■ n 
"The Good Samaritan," says: 

"Love does not ask, What claim 
has this man and that pjairorrnre, but 
What does this or that Tr an hee'/I that 
I can do for him? It must-ha^'Q been, 



to the question, How shall I inherit 
eternal life? The answer is, Love as 
this Samaritan did. You will not re- 
ceive eternal life as the reward of 
doing so, in the sense that, having 
now helped men and sacrificed "for 
them, you shall enter into an eternity 
in which yo»i may cease doing so, anj 
live in some other relation to them. 
Not so. But by loving men thus you 
hereby enter into that state of spirit 
and that relation to your fellow men 
which is eternal life, the only eternal 



Jesus is in himself aware of every 
human pain, He feels it also. In 
him, too, it is pain. With the energy 
of tenderest love be wills his brothers \ 
and sisters free, that he may fill 
them to over owing with that essen- 
tial thing, joy. For that they were 
indeed created. . But the moment . 
they exist, becomes the first thing, 
not happiness; and he must make, 
them true.— George Macdonald. - , 

vt* 5i:f» .,•!,'•» z?di;i- Oil Hi t*>.% 8a 



January 98, 1»0«. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



11 



Woman's H. M. Society. 

Mrs. W. L. Nichol»on, Editor, Charlotte, N. C. 



A card from the hospital brings 
the cheering news that the. Editor vi 
convalescing. Let us remember bur 
often these weary days, and com- 
mend her to Him who alone can com- 
fort. 



My dear Sisters: — Do we realize 
we are near the close of our confer- 
ence year. Many auxiliaries will 
hold only one more meeting in Feb- 
ruary, so we must face the facts 
squarely, and come up to that meet- 
ing ready and willing each to do her 
part. 

When all who have subscribed tit 
the annual meeting in Winston, to 
the Scarritt Scholarship Fund have 
paid, we will still need $13.50 to com- 
plete the $180.00 necessary. Who 
will hear this call and respond this 
quarter, so we can go up to this an- 
nual conference with no balance to 
raise? 

Will you hear me this once moro, 
plead for the one dollar extra per 
member? We have only received 
$103.00 the last three quarters. 
Where are the remaining nine hun- 
dred and more members? Sisters, the 
call is loud, the need is great, as this 
fund is used to enlarge our wor>[. 
May you each one hear and answer 
prayefully. 

Faithfully yours, 
MRS. R. L. SWAN, 
Treasurer. 



paid dues and expense fund. But 
what of you and me? Have we sun- 
ported this church institution when 
we have paid our extra dollar? By 
no means. We must pay her extra 
dollar, too. The edict is as old as, 
"ye that are strong ought then to 
bear the infirmities of the weaic/' 
There is not an auxiliary in this con- 
ference whose members are not aola 
to make the extra dollar average and 
when it is not done somebody has 
failed to measure up to the privilege, 
aye, more! Somebody has broken a 
promise made to the great God him- 
self. "Will you support the church 
and its institutions?" Oh! We will 
redeem our promise, Father, w^ 
meant what we said. Forgive us for 
ever having put so low an estimate 
on thy love for us or our love for 
those whom thou so lovest. Never 
again, never again! We will "sup- 
port the church and its institutions." 

MRS. T. . J. COPELAND. 



THE "EXTRA DOLLAR." 

"Do you promise to support the 
Church and its Institutions?" Do 
you remember that day? The day 
you answered that question, "I do, bv 
the help of God?" Don't you remem- 
ber just how the sunlight slanted 
through the windows? Don't you re- 
member the worn Bible on the old- 
fashioned Bookboard? Was the man 
of God an old man, on whose kindly 
face the great Atrists Tim*i, Suffer- 
ing and Burden-bearing had painted 
the story in hieroglyphics that then 
you could not read — But, Oh! You 
have been to school since then; y-ju 
know those characters now, ye3, 
know them "by heart." I say and I 
mean by heart. I like that old school 
term — but I wander. Was your 
mother there, and did she come with 
the rest to shaite hands with you? Oh 
did she? Well, if she did, you and 
I are kin forever more. Well, meant 
every word of it, didn't we? "Sup- 
port the Church and its Institutions." 
Say a little prayer there, "its insti- 
tutions." And now we have paid 
our dues up through this last quar- 
ter We have paid our conference 
expense fund, ten cents a month the 
first, and twenty-five cents the last. 
Now have we supported this institu- 
tion of the church? Have we, Man 
of God, who heard us promise? Have 
we mother, who was so glad her girl 
was going to be of those "ho enter in 
through the gates into the city." 
Have we, dear Savior, who first 
loved us? We have paid $1.45. Say 
you who are sick and sad and kno^v 
not our Lord and his loving kindness, 
have we? We have paid $1.45, Oh! 
And is it so cheap as that? Heart, 
answer the question, Have I support- 
ed the "Church and its Institutions ."' 
This institution of the church, The 
Home Mission Society, asks for one 
dollar per member more than the 
above named $1.45. Are there wo- 
men among you who really are una- 
ble to pay an extra dollar? Then, 
sister mine, she has supported the 
church and its institutions when she 



THAT EXTRA DOLLAR. 

We are now in the fourth quarter 
and in about six weeks all books 
will have to be closed and the re- 
ports for the year rendered. 

I hope the treasurers will be veiy 
busy gathering up the dues, confer- 
ence expense fund, all pledges for 
scholarships, etc., and that "extra 
dollar" that our finances may be in 
good shape, bur work well rounded 
up, that we may show ourselves 
workmen that needeth not to be 
ashamed. 

Of course every member expects 
to pay her dues 10 cents per month, 
and conference expense fund 25 cents 
per year, but strange to say, some- 
times she expresses herself that we 
are asking too much when we ask 
for that extra dollar. 

Now sister, you, who do not want 
to pay that "extra dollar", are the 
ones I want to talk to for a few min- 
utes. ' 1 

The dues are used for building par- 
sonages in our own conference f>nd 
other needy places. In our own con- 
ference we have some where near 
40 charges that have no home for the 
preacher, so we need every dime that 
we can get in dues. The conference 
expense fund is used for the expense 
of carrying on the work locally and 
in the conference. That "extra dol- 
lar" is sorely needed in education^ 
and spiritual uplift. 

There are the mountain schools, 
the Cuban schools in Florida, Chi- 
nese, Japanese and Korean schools on 
the Pacific coast. The board issued 
the call to the constituency for an 
extra dollar per member, putting the 
amount so low that any one could 
pay it, and of course as much more 
as they will. Just think of it, 2 cenrs 
per week. Who would withhold such 
a mite when it is frought with ao 
much good. 

Suppose there are 20 members in 
one auxiliary, and that auxiliary 
should send to the treasurer $20.00, 
undirected, that is, to go into the 
general treasury. Now if that auxil- 
iary sends only $5.00 or $10.00, you 
see it is not fair to those who pay,- 
for then the average instead of be- 
ing $1.00 per member, is only 25 
Cents or 50 cents per member. 

■One dollar is a small amount to 
give to help bring the world to 
Christ, and yet if every member will 
give it we will have about $1,400.00 
extra dollars in the treasury this 
year. 

My dear sister, think seriously 



No Land So Rich That Fertilizer 
Cannot Make It Better 

You use fertilizers for the profit you get out of them — and the 
better the land the more profitably a good fertilizer can be used on it. 
Do not imagine because land will produce a fair crop without 

Virginia- Carolina 
Fertilizers 

that these fertilizers cannot be profitably used on it, or that they were 
made only for land too poor to produce without them. If poor land 
will show a normal increase when fertilizer is used, good land will 
show at least double the increase. Use Virginia Carolina Fertilizers 
to increase the quality., as well as the qtiantity of the crop— and you 
will increase the profits from your land. 

"I have been using your fertilizers for a number of years" says 
Mr. William Fraiser, of Glasburg, La., "and find that it not only pa)S 
to fertilize, but to do plenty of it, and use the best fertilisers to be 
had, such as your brands. I have used a number of them and found 
them to be as recommended and to give better results than any other 
fertilizers that I have ever used." 

Every planter and farmer should have a copy of the new 1009 
Virginia-Carolina Farmers' Year-Book. Get a free copy from your 
fertilizer dealer, or write our nearest sales office. 



Virginia- Carolina Chemical Co. 



Salts Offices 

Richmond. Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Mem. -his, Tenn. 




Sahs Offices 

Durham, N. C. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Columbus, Ga. 
Montgomery, Ala. 
Shreveport, La. 



about this and pray over it and see 
if you don't think it not only a duty 
but a happy privilege to give to '-he 
Master through this channel. Give 
gladly that you may be thrice bless- 
ed,- not grudgingly or of necessity, 
but be happy in the giving. God our 
Father wants us to be willing-heart- 
ed. He says: "Every beast of the 
forest is mine and the cattle upon a 
thousand hills. If I were hungry 1 
would not tell thee, for the world is 
mine and the fulness thereof. Offer 
unto God thanksgiving, and pay thj 
vows unto the Most High: and call 
upon me in the day of trouble; I will 
deliver thee and thou shalt glorify 
me." 

If given to help His little ones on 
earth in the name and for the sake 
of our Savior, then we will be the 
ones to receive good measure, press- 
ed down, shaken together and run- 
ning over, from the bountiful hand 
of a loving father. 

MRS. F. E. ROSS. 



A GREAT MANUFACTURING PLANT. 

The development of the new South is 
nowhere more conspicuously illustrated 
than in the immense establishment of 
the DeLoach Mill Manufacturing Com- 
pany, manufacturers of high grade mil! 
machinery. at Bridgeport, Ala. The 
plant occupies forty acres immediately 
on the Tennessee river and its products 
are shipped not only to all parts of this 
country, but all over the wo-ld. Its out- 
put embraces saw mills of all kinds, corn 
■crushers, corn mills, Hour mills, meal 
bolters and almost everything in the line 
of high class machinery. The head of 
the concern, Mr. A. A. DeLoach, is the 
inventor of the variable friction feed 
that has made DeLoach machinery fa- 
mous. The Company has just issued a 
handsome 250-page illustrated catalog, 
which will be sent free to any one in- 
terested in machinery. Address De- 
Loach Mill Manufacturing Company, 
Box 777, Bridgeport, Ala. 



THE NOBLEST CULTURE. 

I will this day try to live a simple, 
sincere and serene life; repelling 
every thought of discontent, anxietv, 
discouragement, impurity, and sel."- 
seeking; cultivating cheerfulness, 
magnanimity, charity, self-control, 
and the habit of holy silence; exer- 
cising economy in expenditure, care- 
fulness in conversation, diligence in 
appointed service, fidelity to every 
trust, and a childlike trust in God. — 
From a calendar by Bishop John H. 
Vincent. 

SOUVENIR PCST CARDS FREE. 

• Thrp° choicest anistie Souvenir Tost Cards, 

• beautiful colors, absolutely free, if you petid 
stamp for postage. W. H. Gates, 104 W. 8th St. , 
1 peka, Kan. - 



STIEFF'S 

LATEST WONDER! 



THE 

Miniature Grand 

Just think, — a wee little 
grand piano only 5 ft. long! 
A wee little grand piano, so 
small it requires only a little 
more space than an upright, 
yet contains all the tonal 
beauties and the perfect ac- 
tion of the large grand and 
a wonderful volume. 

Small enough for the 
smallest parlor; tone enough 
for the largest parlor. 

Costs little more than an 
upright piano, and within 
reach of the most economi- 
cal buyer. 



CHAS. M. STIEFF 

Manufacturer of the 
ARTISTIC STIEFF, SHAW, & 
STIEFF SELF-PLAYER 
PIANOS. 



Southern Wareroom 

5 West Trade St. 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

C. H. WILMOTH, Mgr. 



$65 



PFR MONTH "tralgh salary and ex- 
1 Lilv Mll/ll 1 11 ponses. io men with 
rig. 'o Intro lice our Poulty Iteine- 
dles. Ban'; ref's given. Don't an's. unless you 
mean bus n ess. 

Lnreka Poutry Food Mfg. Co.,_Depl. 58, East St. Loo : s, m. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



January 28, 190i). 



The Sunday School Lesson. 



HUSBAND INSISTED 



Some ladies allow a simple little 
trouble to grow into a big one, just 
for lack of the right medicine. 

Too much trouble; too much ex- 
pense; don't know what medicine 
to take. 

All excuses ; and poor ones, too. 

Such ladies need some one, with 
their own best interests at heart, who 
will see to it that they begin to take 
Cardui at once. 

Now, Mrs. Rena Hare, of Pierce, 
Fla., luckily for her, had a husband, 
who, she says, "insisted on my tak- 
ing Cardui." 

In describing her plight, she uses 
these words : "I was a sufferer from 
severe female trouble. I had pains 
in my side, drawing pains in legs, 
fainty spells, could not sleep. In 
fact, it was a general break-down. I 
found no relief till I took Cardui, 
when the first bottle helped me and 
now I am almost well." 

Your druggist will gladly sell you 
a bottle of Cardui, with full direct- 
ions for use. 

• It is purely vegetable, non-intoxi- 
cating, and reliable remedy, for all 
women, young and old, who suffer 
from any of the common female 
troubles. Try Cardui. 



AN ACTIVE FORCE. 

The church of Jesus Christ is a 
factor is history, but it is also meant 
to be a factor in the world. It is 
intended to sustain reformatory and 
remedial relations with society, and 
to be helpful in making the world a 
more habitable place in which to 
live. No church can content itself 
with being a mere passive reality, 
but should become an active . force 
in social, economic and political life. 
A local church is properly a point of 
departure for broadly reaching relig- 
ious, philanthropic, and missionary 
efforts, and when it is faithful to this 
prospectus of spiritual efficiency it 
will also be sure to effect very prac- 
tical reforms in society and the state. 
— New York Observer. 



BLESSED MEMORIES. 

They of blessed memory help us; 
for they make it easy for us to be- 
lieve in goodness and God and eter- 
nal life and heaven. They are even 
our last stand in the evidence for 
personal immortality; for we cannot 
believe that all that power of loving 
and all that wealth of grace and all 
that beauty of character have ceased. 
He lives a poor attenuated life who 
has never thrilled to the mystic un- 
ion, who does not know that — 
"There are two societies alone on 
earth ; 

The noble living, and the noble 
dead." 

And sometimes even we see that they 
are not two but one great society, 
the one irrefragable bend of souls, 
the one communion of the saints. 
The memory of the just is blessed, a 
blessing to us more than, we can put 
into words, not only in stimulating 
us to emulation, not only exicting us 
and guiding us to all good, but also 
establishing us in faith in good and 
faith that we too have the same real 
vocation, to which we are called to 
walk worthily. — Professor Hugh 
Black. 



One of Dr. Johnson's ingredients of 
happiness was, "A little less time 
than you want." That means always 
have so many things you want to see, 
to have, and to do, that no day is 
quite long enough for all you would 
like to get done before you go to bed. 
— Helen Hunt Jackson, 



LESSON V.— JANUARY 31, 190J. 
The Trial of Peter and John. 

(Acts 4, 1-31.) 
Time — A. D. 30. Place— Jerusalem. 



Golden Text. — They were all filled 
with the Holy Ghost, and they spake 
the word of God with boldness. — Acts 

4, 31. 



Opposition. 

The healing of the lame man fur- 
nished a text for Peter from which 
he preached with great effect a risen 
Christ for the healing of the world. 
The religious leaders took exceptioa 
to the revival. It was all right to be 
religious and to be serious about re- 
ligion; but there must be no noiso 
about it and the proprieties of wor- 
ship must be observed. Moreover, 
sound doctrine was being set at 
naught. Heretics in behalf of the 
truth may comfort themselves in tne 
fellowship of Jesus, of Peter, James, 
John and Paul. Peter preached the 
resurrection of Jesus. Just that was 
needed to crown the sum of his of- 
fending. That he should preach at 
all was an offense to the hierarchy. 
There was no place in the notion of 
religion for the public witness of a 
lay and unofficial ministry (4, 13>. 
That he should be eloquent to the 
point of moving the crowd to inter- 
est was an offense to "the commander 
of the temple," who thought proprie- 
ty in worship to be God's first law. 
That he should proclaim the resur- 
rection of Jesus was an offense to the 
Sadducees, who contended that 
"there is no resurrection" (Matt. 22, 
23). Poor Peter! Surely, his was a 
hard lot! And all because he had 
done a "good deed" to an impotent 
man. 

It is worth observing about all this 
that (1) being good and doing good 
does not necessarily exempt a man 
from adverse criticism; (2) that re- 
ligion when unspiritually held tends 
to narrowness and cruelty; (3) and 
that officialism almost inevitably 
tends toward arrogant assertion of 
official opinion as the standard and 
test of truth. 

Persecution. 

The authorities apparently weie 
skilled in the art of persecution. They 
arrested Peter and John first and ar- 
gued with them afterward. A nignt 
in prison is ordinarily a specific for 
moderate speech and the cure of va- 
garies. For the truth which they 
maintained Peter and John were im- 
prisoned. In the same truth five 
thousand believers who were without 
the prison walls rejoiced (v. 4i. 
Which was the happier? Who shall 
say? 

In the morning the two were sited 
before the Sanhedrin. The arraign- 
ment had to do with the miracle. 
Peter answered. His address is a 
model in its way. Noticeable are 
the three steps in its development. 
Peter presents the lacts lucidly (vs. 
8-10a) ; he makes a swift, inevitable 
deduction and applies it manfully (v 
10b-ll); he exhorts to action hope- 
fully (v. 12). All successful preach- 
ing proceeds upon these lines. His 
audience, unwilling and critical, were 
greatly impressed; they marvelled. 
More than that. The fact silenced 
them. They had no reply to make. 
To prosecute the two criminally was 
to invite a popular riot. To let them 
go untouched was to make them pop- 
ular heroes. Hence the order of re- 
pression. "Let us stop them by 
threats from spreading any further 
among the people the knowledge of 
this Name" (v. 17). To which- Peter 



aud John, with Peter, probably, for 
spokesman, replied: "Judge whether 
It Is right in God's sight to listen 
to you Instead of listening to 
God. As for us what we have seen 
and heard we cannot help speaking 
about" (vs. 19, 20). Whereupon the 
court, adding further threats, let 
them go. 

Prejudice. 

1. The court is a useful and always 
needed lesson against prejudice. They 
were the representatives of God to 
the nation and they had not yet learn- 
ed that God was never afraid of be- 
ing investigated. Objections to the 
resurrection of Jesus were based up- 
on traditional prejudice. But the res- 
urrection of Jesus was a question of 
fact, asserted as such and open to 
full and free and personal investi- 
gation. Nearly all the members of 
the court knew Jesus, had consented 
to His death, were cognizant of His 
crucifixion and fully informed as to 
the report of His resurrection. Why 
did they not satisfy themselves of its 
truth or falsity? 

2. Moreover, they were confronted 
with another fact bearing upon the 
truth of the resurrection which they 
were content to. ignore. Here were 
men consenting to forsake home and 
occupation and to go to prison for the 
sake of a risen Jesus, who if He had 
not risen, could never have moved 
them from the comfortable routine of 
the usual. The fact of itself needed 
investigation. One has need of per- 
sonal and intimate introspection to 
realize how the sin of the priests 
and of the Sadducees was not of an 
age but for all time. Seven-eighth3 
of religious controversy might be 
avoided if people could only be. per- 
suaded to face and investigate simple 
questions of fact. We are slaves of 
use and wont. Slovenly thinking, in- 
dolent acquiescence in inherited opin- 
ions, these are the source of preju- 
dice. To be passionate in their de- 
fense becomes the hall mark of or- 
thodoxy; to test them in the presence 
of fact a tendency to atheism. But 
God has no favor for such. He is 
ever with those who, like the dis-:i- 
ples, listen to His voice and speak 
out whether men hear or whether 
they forbear. 

Secret of Courage. 
The boldness of Peter and John is 
associated in the minds of the per- 
secutors, with their having been with 
Jesus. It was not alone the thought 
of past association with Jesus that 
gave Peter his courage. It was the 
thought of a present Christ who at 
that very moment was fulfilling in 
Peter the promise: When they deliv- 
er you up, be not anxious how or 
what ye shall speak, for it shall be 
given you in that hour what ye shall 
speak (Matt. 10, 19). In v. 8 it is 
distinctly said that Peter, "filled witii 
the Holy Ghost," spoke to the coun- 
cil. Here then is the secret of cour- 
age. To be with Christ in the full- 
ness of the Spirit One needs not to 
be an apostle for fellowship so rare 
and so noble. God knows that the 
need of courage is as great for the 
disciple today as for Peter and John 
in the day of their trial. To keep our- 
selves true to the .Christlike ideal In 
the home, in business, in the study, 
in social life, that requires courage of 
the highest order. We may lower 
our standards without great fear of 
reproach on the part of the world; 
but we live in constant self-reproach 
at, our own pussilanimity. Who or 
what shall save us from that? Only 
companionship with Jesus. Perfect 
fellowship r with Him breeds in man 



THE CHILDREN 

will eat anything- that is good, but they 
have their preferences, as their elders 
do. They all like 

JELL-O 

fand it is good for them. 
Seven flavors : 
Strawberry, 
Lemon, Orange, 
Chocolate, 
Cherry and Peach. 
Approved by Pure 
Food Commissioners. 
10c. a package, 
at all grocers. 
Illustrated Recipe 
Book. tree. 
The Genesee Pore Food Co, 
Le Roy, N. Y. 

the spirit of perfect love, and perfect 
love casteth out fear. — New Yorit 
Christian Advocate. 



THE COMPLETE CHARACTER. 

It was Goethe who said, "Life Is 
a quarry." He does not mean the 
life outside of youroelf. He means 
your own life, that separate part of 
God's universe over which he has 
set you as supreme master, king to 
rule the dominion. Goethe says that 
this life, your own life, his life, ev- 
erybody's life, is a quarry. A quar- 
ry is a place where stone is gotten. 
The value of a quarry is always in 
the quality of its stone. The Rut- 
land marble quarries are framed all 
over our own country. Now, life, if 
it be a quarry, is simply a place con- 
taining a something that is valued, 
unformed, but with skill may be 
wrought into what is valuable. The 
stone from the quarry is chiseled into 
form. A greater value comes from 
the chiseling of this stone. Michael 
Angelo's "Moses" is witness of what 
a great artist may do wih a chisel 
upon a block of marble. Really, 
then, if your own life is a quarry, 
you yourself must be the artist and 
out of the material of the quarry you 
are going to make what is beautiful 
and worth while to the world. — John 
T. McFarland. 



"HE'S JUST THE SAME TODAY. 

The religion of Jesus consists pri- 
marily in the relation between a hu- 
man soul and a person. When Jesus 
was on earth, He said, "Come unto 
Me," "Follow Me," "Abide in Me." 
These commands were not simply 
for the Hebrews of Palestine during 
those short years of the first half of 
the first century. They are perpet- 
ual calls, opening perpetual privi- 
leges, because He who spoke them is 
still living, and invites men today to 
the fellowship that He offered the 
first disciples. All that Jesus was 
on earth to men, all that He became 
to men by His sacrificial death on 
the cross, is available for . men 
through the channels of personal fel- 
lowship with the living Jesus. — Dr. 
George B. Horn. 



"No, I wasn't discouraged. 'Twould- 
n't have been any use; I had to keep 
right on any way," simply answered 
a plain, practical woman to an in- 
quiry as to the way she had won 
through a hard time in her life. 
"When you just have to do things, 
you don't stop to think whether you 
have courage to do them or not, you 
go ahead because there is nothing 
else to do. I suppose the folks that 
get discouraged are the ones that 
have a chance to stop and study 
themselves to see how they are feel- 
ing. When something has got to be 
done and you have to do it, you're 
not watching your courage, you're 
watching your chance." 



January 28, 1909, 



NOitTH CAROLINA CHKtS* tAK ADVOCATE. 



The Farm and Garden. 



GET TO MAKING A GARDEN too common In poisons! Recent an- 
RIGHT NOW. alyses show that one brand of arse- 
Garden making over practically all nate of lead contains only 4" to 5 per 
of the South should be a continuous cent, of arsenous oxide instead of the 
performance. There is scarcely a 12 or 15 per cent, it should have, 
month in the year when something Paris green is often similarly adul- 
fresh from the garden cannot be had, terated; and much of the prepared 
to eat, and scarcely a month in the Bordeaux offered for sale is very low 
year when something should not oe in its per' cent, of copper sulphate 



going into the ground. 



and correspondingly inefficient. Write 



No one can get half the benefit he to your Congressman and tell him to 



should from his garden who expects support 
one or two plantings a year to keep Farmer, 
it going. 

Indeed the way to have a good 
garden is to keep up the supply of 
each vegetable and the variety of 



the measure. — Progressive 



THE FIRST DUTY OF SOUTHERN 
STATESMANSHIP. 

In an agricultural state such as 
the different ones by regular and ours is, too much stress cannot be 
successive plantings. placed upon agricultural education, 

* * * as a great majority of our people live 

Cabbage plants should be growing upon the farm. A man good in his 
now all' over the warmer portions of avocation or profession, whether far- 
the South, and onions and turnips mer, doctor, blacksmith, or any other 
or kale or rape for greens. You may useful laborer, is apt to be a good 
not know that rape makes greens of citizen, and the possibility of success 
the first quality, but it does — and ail and contenment is largely in his fa- 
these things can be planted -right vor. The skilled man in his line of 



now,' too. 



work adds rapidly to the wealth of 



Set out some cabbage plants this the state, and thus strengthens the 



week, some three or four weeks la- 
ter, and so on. 



revenues upon which the state de- 
pends for all the great work she'uii- 



Sow some, lettuce now, and plant dertakes. 
some radishes, in a cold frame or With telephones, rural free delivery 
even in a siinny location, with a light of mail, and good roads, there is need- 
covering of brush. Then in two weeks ed to make country life more prbfita- 
sow some more. In this way you can ble and enjoyable, a knowledge corn- 
have both these vegetables until hot prehensive and accurate as may be 
weather comes; and then in the fall of agriculture, of preserving and in- 
you can begin again and have thorn creasing soil fertility, of 'plant selec- 
practically all the winter. They come tion and plant life, of rotation, drain- 
so quickly and cost so little to grow age, diversifiation, farm economies 
if you have a suitable place that the ana comforts and other matters to 
loss of one or two sowings amounts make happier and more remunerative 
to very little indeed.' A very small the business of those who woo neces- 
bed of either is all that is needed for sities of human life from the soil with 
an ordinary family; and neither is patience and toil, 
good after it gets old. 



Irish potatoes, the "first eariies," 



Not a dozen great colleges can ade- 
quately supply it to the people. We 
recognize the great value of those 
may also be planted now, and then men here and there in the state, some 
a few weeks later some more, and of them graduates of our instituions, 
so; on until the "second crop" for whose intelligent, practical and pro- 
seed-is planted next summer. Early gressive farming is an example and 
potatoes always bring good prices; an inspiration to whole communities, 
and it; makes one feel good to dig Doubtless in the long years the de- 
out ' potatoes" worth $1.00 to $1.75 a sired results will be reached under 
bushel when he gets at the rate of the present processes of progress, but 
200 to 300 bushels to the acre. Have the magnitude and the magnificent 
a rich, loose soil for the early crop, possibilities of our agricultural inter- 
plant rather shallow, fertilize liber- ests justify every reasonable effort to 



ally and keep them well- cultivate. 



quicken them. I shall encourage a 



Garden peas can also be planted policy already adopted, urging that 

now, and they also come quickly and the simple essentials of agriculture 

last but a little while. Beets, too, be thoroughly taught in our public 

are in season both for eating and schools. 

planting, and if you had planted some With such essentials taught to the 

salsify and some parsnips last fall boys I predict a thirst in them for 

they would be getting good just now. more information which will increase 

The more tender vegetables may the attendance upon our • Institutes, 

also be had much sooner than we the subscription to agricultural pa- 

commohly have them. It will pay pers, and the study of farm bulletins 

to risk a dozen or so very early to- and other farm literature, all of which 

mato plants, a row or two of beans will promote the pleasure and profit 

•of "a little patch of sweet corn. Pro- of agricultural life. — Prom the Inaug- 

tectipn can be given these little ural Address of Governor W. W. 

patches if they need it, and the first Kitchin, North Carolina, Raleigh, 

of : anything always tastes good January 12, 1909. 

enough to repay the little extra care ■ 

necessary to produce it. • 



done or evil done, for God has "blott- 
ed out all our transgressions," and 
through the atoning blood of Jesus 
Christ we have a knowledge within 
that God is patient, loving and kind. 
He "remembers that we are dust," 
and by mercy and justice God has 
pardoned our sins. "By grace we are 
saved." 

Through the mists of the years, the 
battles of life, we have come to the 
resting place before we enter into 
the great Beyond, and, lingering on 
the verge of eternity, we gaze into 
the future, desiring to part the veil 
asunder, and enter into the life of 
the blessed. Earth is daily receding, 
death has lost all its terrors, the fu- 
ture life beckons us away, and, look- 
ing intently, we behold God, our Cod 
and Father, with outstretched hands, 
standing just within the portals of 
the heavenly home, eager to welcome 
us to the shining home of our loved 
ones gone before. The poet sang 
the truth, and we now feel it true 
as never before: 

"I shall steer my bark where the 
waves roll dark, 
I shall cross a stranger sea; 
But I know I shall stand on that 
bright strand, 
Where my loved ones are waiting 
for me." 

Here the conception of God has be- 
come a source of comfort. Long 
since we have repented of our sins; 
long since we have ceased to doubt 
his eternal kindness; long since we 
have committed to his care our eter- 
nal 1 * destiny, and are patiently wait- 
ing the summons, "Come up higher." 

From the eminence of old age we 
are thus prepared for the great 
change, so that when the voice is 
still, the eyes are closed, the hands 
folded across the breats and the sil- 
ver locks carefully parted for the last 
time, we look into the face of the 
dead; and see the heavenly smile 
thereon, we, the living, are given a 
new and better conception of the 
eternal fitness of things; and instead 
of tears of bitterness, we weep tears 
of joy and gladness, because we know 
that whatever there may have been 
of joy in the present life, there may 
have been of sorrow, here, there shall 
be no more, for God "shall wipe all 
tears from their eyes," and they shall 
rejoice without fear. The best con- 
ception of God has come te us 
through the light of knowledge, and 
in the latter days of the world we 
know God better, love him in a purer 
way, and worship him in faith. Out 
of the past shadows may arise, but 
as for us, we will cling to the pres- 
ent attitude of love, mercy and truth 
as the new and higher conception of 
God the Father. — Christian Work. 



Broken Down 

Over-work, worry, mental ef- 
fort, sickness or any strain upon 
the nervous system affects the 
whole body. All the organs de- 
pend upon the nerves for strength. 
If they don't get it they can't do 
the work demanded of them. 
Dr. Miles' Nervine restores nerv- 
ous energy, and builds up the 
uroken down system. 

"Two years ago my wife was almost 
at the point of death with nervous pros- 
tration. I shall never forget how she 
Buffered, It was night and day, until w» 
commenced to use Dr. Miles' Nervine 
and she speedily began to recover. To- 
day she is enjoying as good health as she 
ever did. 

REV. J. H. HERSHET, I.ltitz, Pa. 
11 first bottle fails to benefit, money back. 
MILES MEDICAL CO., Elkhart. Ind. 



Post Cards Ree 

Borne of Andrew Jackson, State Capitols, hunt- 
ing scenes, and other souvenir cards of national 
interest, TEN in all, FREE to persons who send 
Jno. F. Draughon, Nashville, Tenn., names and ad- 
dresses of 4 or more young people most likely to 
attend business college or take lessons Bv Mail. 

IF YOU want TO P!GEfrom the DOLLAR-A-DAY 
class into the FIVE-DOLIAR-A-DAY class, then 
START RIGHT by asking for FREE catalogue 

DRAUCHON'S 

Practical Business College 

Washington, Raleigh or Co omnia 



TO DRIVE OUT MALARIA AND BUILD 
UP THE SYSTEM. 

Take the Old Standard Grove's Taste- 
less Chill Tonic. You know what you are 
taking. The formula Is plainly printed 
on every bottle, showing It is simply 
Quinine and Iron In a tasteless form, 
and the most effectual form. For grown 
people and children. 60c. 



WANTED. 



Responsible man with horse and bug- 

fy in each community, salary $5.00 to 
10.00 per day, to take orders from own- 
ers of Farms, Orchards, and Home Gar- 
dens. A splendid opportunity for far- 
mer's sons, also fruit tree and sewing 
machine agents, to make a business con- 
nection which will become more profita- 
ble each year. Address P. O. Box 670, 
Young's Island, S. C. 



THE SUPREME FRIEND 
God loves us, in some mysterious 
way, for ourselves. He knows the 
worst of us, and yet his love does not 
fail. A true friend has been denned 
as "one who loves us in spite of our- 
selves." In this sense, we indeed find 
in Jesus Christ the supreme Friend, 
who will not let us go, and from whose 
unchanging love nothing can separate 



GOD AND THE EVENING OF LIFE. 

After the storm comes the sunshine 
Adulterated Spraying Materials. and calm. After the strenuousness of 
Representative' Lowden, of Illinois, youth and manhood comes the years 
has introduced in Congress a bill to of calm and beautiful worship and 
prevent the adulteration of fungi- communion with God. The light has 
cides and insecticides, establishing come, questions have given way to 
recognized standards of purity and faith, and our doubts have resolved 
providing for its enforcement by the themselves into certainties. We are 
Secretaries of Agriculture, the Tread- no longer filled with fear; we ap- 
ury and Commerce and Labor. proach God with filial love, and eut 
The bill follows the lines of the of hearts filled with loving gratitude 
pure food law in its essential feat- we bow before him in humble ador- 
ures— and is one in which eveiy ation and worship. We are" no long- 
trucker and fruit grower should be er tormented by thoughts of punish- 
interested. Widespread frauds are all ment awaiting us for duties left un- 



" 'One of the things that I am 
thankful for every day that I live is 
for my share in the world's work,' 
said a wise and busy woman. 'I am 
thankful that my hands are full.' The 
blessing of the full hands and the full 
days is one that we sometimes fail 
to appreciate until illness or some 
misfortune forces us to stand aside 
for a time while the eager, useful pro- 
cession passes by without us. A vi- 
tal part in the world we live in, a 
head and a hand for its work, a heart 
for its needs, its joyr its burdens, 
and faith for its outlook — these are 
the best gifts that can be ours for 
healthful and happy days." 



A little girl of old New York de- 
scent, in whose presence the family 
glories were often talked about, was 
overheard lately rebuking her pet 
kitten. Holding pussy by her fore- 
paws, and looking her full in the 
face, she remarked: "I'm ashamed 
of you, Kitty, for being so naughty, 
and just think, your grandmother 
was a Maltese!" — Harper's Bazar. 



A high conception of the beauty 
and glory of the church will save us 
from that foolish vagrancy that is one 
of the perils of our time; we shall 
cease to treat the church as a shop 
to which we bring our custom, but 
shall regard it as a sanctuary and a 
home in which love and faith display 
their richest gifts.— Rev. A. T. Gut- 
ery. 



Little three-year-old Mabel went 
out for a walk with her father one 
morning, and as they started to re- 
turn her father asked: "Shall we 
walk back, Mabel, or take a street 
car?" 

"I'd razzer walk," she replied, "if 
'ou will tarry me." — Our Young Folks. 



Some Christians are like the well 
of a man I know. The well is all 
right, with two exceptions; it freezes 
up in winter and dries up in sum- 
mer.— Moody. 



Love never asks, How little can I 



give? 



but, How much? It never 



seeks limits, but always outlets. — 
Rev. T. May, M. A. 



mjktii <.;akumna cukistian auvucatk. 



January IS, 190». 



Our Dead. 



"I am the resurrection and the Life." 
— -Jesus. 

We will Insert an obituary of 150 words 
free of charge. For the excess of 150 
words we charge one cent per word. 
Count the words In excess and send the 
money with obituary. Observe this rule, 
please. Do not put In original poetry. 

The above also applies to Tributes of 
Respect. 



Hill, — Brother Isaac Hill departed 
this life January 9, 1909, at the age 
of 72 years. The funeral services 
was conducted at Mt. Pleasant Sun- 
day following, where in former year3 
lie had held his membership. 

For several years he had been in 
failing health. The sufferings were 
no doubt a blessing in disguise. Last 
May tho writer, with several of his 
neighbors, held service in his home 
at Providence Cotton Mill. Duriug 
this precious . service Brother Hill 
again joined the church at May's 
chapel. Since that time he has been 
a happy man, though suffering all 
the while. I do not know just how 
long before this that Brother Hill re- 
newed his covenant with God. "O, 
death, where is thy sting? O, grav:;, 
where is thy victory?" Thanks be 
unto God, who giveth us the victory 
through our Lord Jesus Christ." May 
the bereaved take comfort in hope 
of this victory. 

T. S. COBLE, P. C. 



children were born, all of whom are 

living. 

His death followed a protracted 
and painful sickness, but he endured 
it with a Christian courage and resig- 
nation. He was calm and composed 
to the last and expressed no fear 
whatsoever of death, but a tender 
father's regret and sorrow over lend- 
ing his family. The last days of 
Brother Wilson were replete witn 
the fruits of an unbroken life. 
Often scripture was upon his dying 
lips, especially the 23d Psalm. 
His pastor, 

G. E. EAVES. 



Some £lad day beyond the tomb. 
We shall meet some golden day. 
Time speed on. 
Angels guard our weary feet, 
Pearly gates wide open be. 
Dear wife and mother waits on our 
coming with welcome sweet." 

W. R. BLACKBURN. 



Hewitt. — Mrs. Essie Keener Hewitt 
was born October 26, 1881, and de- 
parted this life January 15, 1909. 

Mrs. Hewett was the daughter cf 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Keener. Sep- 
tember, 1904 she was married to Mr. 
Doras Hewett. In 1895 she professed 
faith in Christ and joined the M. E. 
Church, South. For several months 
she had been a constant sufferer 
from dropsy, yet patient in it all. Her 
life was a beautiful example of de- 
votion to her parents to her family 
and her church. Many times during 
her illness she expressed a willing- 
ness to go at the good summons. Not 
long before she died when asked by 
the writer, "Are you ready to go'f 
she said: "Yes, sir; I am saved. U's 
all right with me." She sang, "My 
faith looks up to Thee." Soon after 
she bid farewell to her loved ones 
and passed peacefully away. 
The funeral service was conducted 
by the writer. May the bereaved be 
comforted with these words. 

T. S. COBLE, P. C. 



A GOOD WOMAN GONE. 

On the 23d of December, 1908, «»t 
McAdenville, N. C, the summons 
came to the home of Rev. C. H. Ca"- 
iness and called away his beloved 
companion who was a daughter of 
the late A. "W. and Carey Leonard, of 
Bear Creek township, Chatham coun- 
ty. 

Mrs. Caviness professed faith In 
Christ when but a girl and joined 
Pleasant Grove Christian Church, of 
which she remained a member until 
after her marriage in 1895, when she 
joined the M. E. Church, South, of 
which her husband is a minister. 
She was buried at Pleasant Grove, 
Randolph county, December 26th, in 
the presence of a large concourse of 
relatives and friends who came to 
pay the last tribute of respect to one 
they loved. 

I remember the deceased as a kind 
and affectionate schoolmate and 
friend, and a cheerful- devoted Chris- 
tian. She leaves gja -sorrowing hus- 
band and four little child, three 
brothers, two sisters' and a host of 
relatives and friends* who mourn 
their loss, but not as those who haro 
no hope, for she died, we are told, 
in the full triumph of faith in Him 
of Whom she used to love to sing: 
"It may be far, it may be near, 
There is a hope, there is a fear. 
But in the future waiting I 
Shall Jesus see, yes, by and by." 

R. H. D. 



RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT. 

Whereas, God In His infinite wis- 
dom has removed from our churoli 
our much loved sister, Mrs. Lucy 
Carter Wright, who at the age of 31 
years departed this life on December 
21, 1908,. and 

Whereas, she, during her illness, 
exhibited that Christian patience, for- 
titude, fidelity to every duty and loy- 
alty to church and absent friends; 
therefore be it 

Resolved 1. That we have lost one 
of our most faithful members. We 
fully realize this loss, but are will- 
ing to submit to the will of Him who 
knoweth best, and who never makes 
• mistakes. 

Resolved 2. That we extend to the 
sorrowing husband, fond mother and 
dear little daughter our heartfelt 
sympathy, and recommend them to 
the comforting promises tender mer- 
cies and loving kindness of our hea- 
venly Father. 

Resolved 3. That these resolutions 
be spread upon the Sunday school 
record, and a copy be sent to our 
county papers and to the North Caro- 
. lina Christian Advocate for publica- 
tion. 

This January 7, 1909. 

M. D. HOLDERBY, 
MATTIE E. WORSHAM, 
ALLEN E. WHARTON, 
NANNIE E. MITCHELL, 
VIRGINIA A. ALCORN, 
Committee. 



FRANKLIN DISTRICT.— 1»t Round. 

R. M. Taylor, F. B„ Franklin, N. C. 

Webster, Webster Jan. 2-3 

Uayesvllle, Oak Forest " 30-31 

Hlawasgee circuit. Ranger.. ..Feb. 6-7 

idurphy aLallon " 7-8 

Wtilttler, Whlttier " 13-H 

CHARLOTTE DISTRICT.— 2d Round. 

H. K Boyer. P. H., Charlotte. N. C. 

Dllwo'th and Big Srlpng Jan. 17 

North Charlotte " 31 

i'.r. vard Street " 81 

Unlonvllle. Grace chapel Feb. i 

Monro,', Central " 7-8 

LlleHvllle. Shlloh... " 13-14 

Polklnn. Hop.well " 20-21 

M,.rv..ii. Iril..n " 27-28 

Prospect, Carmel Mar. 6 

North Monroe and Icemorlee, 

Center " 7-8 

Ansonvllle, Cedar Hill " 13-14 

Wadesboro " 14-16 

Weddlngton, Weddlngton " 20-21 

Waxhaw, Honda Grove " 27-28 

Plnevllle, Harrison April 3-4 

Calvary *' 4-5 

Derlta, Hickory Grove., " 10-11 

Tryon Street " 18 

Mount Zlon " 2&-2S 

Trinity ." May 2 

Chadwlek " 2-3 

Matthews " 15-16 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

W. R. Ware, P. E., Greensboro. N. C. 

Liberty. Liberty Jan. 3-4 

Asheboro ct. , Cedar Kails, Jan. 30-31 

Asheboro station Jan. 31-Feb 1 

Randolph, Trinity " S-7 

Wen I worth, Salem " 13-14 

Relclsville " 14-15 

Uwharrle, Concord " 20-21 

Denton, Denton " 22 

Rtrffin, Lowe's Feb. 14-15 

llandleman and Naomi . " 27-28 

MORGANTON DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 
R. M. Hoyle, P. 15., Marlon. N. C. 

Forest City, Forest City Jan. 2-8 

Morganton station (at night).. " 29-31 
Morganton circuit. Glen Alpine, " 30-31 
Hartland ct., Mt. Pleasant ...Feb. 6-7 
Table Rock ct.. Llnvllle " 13-14 



Wilson. — W. H. Wilson was bom 
April 4, 1852, and fell asleep in our 
Lord in Asheville, January 31, 1903. 

Brother Wilson was converted in 
early life and joined our church in 
which he has ever been a most faith- 
ful and devoted member as well as 
a most useful one. He was one of 
seven brothers and the first to oe 
called to a better land. 

Brother Wilson was trained in a 
good Christian home and continued 
the same life round his own family 
fireside. Before all who knew him 
he lived an upright and unques- 
tioned life, and in his home life his 
beauty and tenderness of character 
was felt most. His large family of 
children loved and honored him 
most beautifully. His relation to 
his family was not one of sternness; 
but one of pure, deep, steadfast love 
and in this way his children followed 
his desires. In the. life of his dauga- 
ters he has given to his generatioi 
that salt and savor that will continue 
and multiply the good work of -his 
life. 

Brother Wilson was married to 
Miss Hattie Chambers, of Buncombi-, 
July 26, 1880, to which union nine 



IN MEMORY OF MATTIE E. 
BLACKBURN. 

While I sit alone at night, think- 
ing of the past and looking out into 
the dark future I want to thank my 
many friends and neighbors for their 
kindness and helping hand during 
the long illness of my wife, Mrs. Mat- 
tie E. Blackburn; who departed this 
life on December 23, 1908.' I feel 
I can never repay these good friends 
and neighbors for their kindness dur- 
ing the last month of her sickness. 
She suffered for the past two years 
with that dreadful disease, consump- 
tion. We fought it with all earthly- 
weapons we could command, but on 
the night of December 23, the shades 
of the black hand, death, came into 
our humble home and claimed its 
victim. I am left with five children 
to fight the battle of this life. Whi.e 
we are surrounded with a host of 
sympathizing friends, it is impossi- 
ble to sound the depths of our agony 
and grief. Yet we are taught that 
God doeth all things well. It is hard 
for us to understand this when our 
loved ones are taken away, yet this 
will some day He made plain to -us, 
and we shall know and understand. 

While my,, home is shrouded in 
gloom because of the, departed one, 
we are assured * that she has gone 
before to prepare for our coming, 
"Some glad morn not far away, 
Just beyond the twilight -dim, 

We shall greet the golden day. 
With the everlasting hymn, 
"When flowers shall bloom no mor« 
to fade and die, 



WEBSTER SUNDAY SCHOOL RES- 
OLUTIONS, 

Whereas, it was the will of our 
heavenly Father to call from the la- 
bors of this world our beloved Sun- 
day school superintendent, Brother 
James W. Terrell, be it therefore 

Resolved 1. That while we as a 
Sunday school bow with reverence 
and submission to the will of God, we 
feel most keenly our loss. 

Resolved 2. That, while we deplore 
his loss and feel that his loss can- 
not be supplied, we shall ever hold 
dear the memory of our departed 
brother. 

Resolved 3. That in his death the 
school has lost one of its most ar- 
dent supporters, the church a worthy 
member, the community a noble cit- 
izen, and his family a most devoted 
and loving father and affectionate 
husband. 

Resolved 4. That we as a Sunday 
school tender to the family of our 
deceased brother our heartfelt sym- 
pathies. ■ 

Resolved 5. That these resolutions 
be spread upon our minutes and con- 
ies be sent to the Jackson County 
Journal and the North Carolina 
Christian Advocate. 

GRACE HALL, 
. JULIA FRIZELL, 
. J. J. WILD, 

COLEMAN HALL, 
ETHEL LEATHERWOOD, 
Committee. 

Quarterly JKCeetings. 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

f D. Atkihs, P. S3., Asheville. N. C. 

Swannanoa, Swannanoa Jan. 2-3 

Burnsvilh;, Burnsvtlle . " 9-10 

" Heridersonv'e ' ct., Moore' s : G've, " 16-17 
HendersonvHle. . . ... " -47 

Central " 24 

North Ashevllte..; ... ... .. .. " 24 

Fairview. Tweeds- . i.-. . " 30-31 

Marshall, Marshall .......Feb. 6-7 

Hot Springe, Hot Springs... ... " 13-14 

The district stewards will meet In Cen- 
tral church, Asheville, - December l«th, 
at 11 a. m. 



SHELBY DISTRICT. — 1st Reund. 

C. F. Sherrlll, P. E.. Shelby. N. C. 
Lincolntou circuit. High Shoals, Jan. 2-3 

South Fork, Ebenezer " 30-31 

Lowesvllle, Hill s Chapel Feb. 6-7 

Mt. Holly " 7-8 

Polkville. Rehobeth " 13-14 

Belwood, Palm Tree " 20-21 

Second Round, in Part 

El Bethel, Salem Feb. 27-28 

Shelby " 28-29 

Cherryville, St. Paul's Mar. 6-7 

Crouse, Pleasant Grove " 7-8 

Gastonia, Main St " 13-14 

Gastonla, Ozark " 13-14 

Lincoln circuit, McKendree ... ■ 20-21 

Lincolnton station " 19-21 

Kings Mountain " 27-28 

Shelby circuit, Earl ... ... ...April 3-4 

Dallas ;..,v. " 4-6 

Lowell, South Point " 10-11 

McAdenville ; " 10-11 

Bessemer City " 17-18 

West End and Franklin Ave.. " 17-18 

STAT ESV I LL E DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

J. N. Huggins, P. E., Statesvllle, N. C. 

Stony Point, Marvin Jan. 2-3 

Catawba : " 30-31 

Hickory ct., West Hickory Feb. 6-7 

Hickory station " 7-8 

Newton " 13-14 

WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

W. H. Willis, P. E., Waynesvllle, N. C. 

Bethel. Bethel Jan. 2-3 

Leicester, Leicester... ... " 30-31 

Haywood, Mt. Zlon ..Feb. 6-7 

Brevard ct.. Greenwood " 13-14 

Brevard station " 14-16 



WINSTON DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

T. F. Marr, P. E., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Farmlngton, i-armington Jan. 2-3 

Lewisviile, Concord " 30-31 

Davidson. Good Hope ... '..Feb. 6-7 

Davie. Hardison " 13-14 

Mocksvllle " 14-15 

Cooleemee " 14 

The district stewards will meet In the 
pastor's study of Centenary church, 
Winston. N. C, Tuesday, December 29, 
at 11:30 a. m. 



MT. AIRY DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

W. M. Bagby. P. E., Mt. Airy. N. C. 

Rural Hall, Trinity Jan. 2-3 

Creston. Big Laurel ... " 39-81 

Boone. Fairvlew Feb. 3-4 

Watauga, Valle Crucls " 6-7 

Wilkes ct.. Cnlon " 16-11 

Second Round, in part 

Wilktsboro ...Feb. 14-15 

N. Wilkesboro " 14-15 

Yadkinville at Booneville " 17-18 

Jonesville, Ebeneier " 20-21 

Elkin " 21-22 

Rockford, Slloam " 24-25 

East Bend, Prospect ... 2v-i:8 

Rural Hall, Germanton Mar. 3-4 

Danbury, Davis Chapel " 6-7 

Pilot Mountain ... " 10-11 

Mt. Airy circuit ... " 13-14 

Mt. Airy " 14-15 



It takes love to see. Love saw 
more in Matthew than anybody; 
and sees more in you than anybody 
else; a.nd if no one wants you, He 
does; and if no one loves you He 
does. If no one cares, He cares ; and 
if you think there is not a friend in 
the world, you have more friends 
than you think, and they are closer 
than you dream. — Gipsy Smith. 



>Wmkry 28, 190S. 



NORTH CAROTiTNA CHRTRtlAN AD VOC A T K 



15. 



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whether there really Is a successful 
remedy for catarrh will be glad to 
learn that Dr. BlOsser, of Atlanta, Ga., 
ha? discovered a method whereby ca- 
tarrh can be eradicated to the very 
last symptom. 

He will send a free sample by mail 
to any man or woman suffering wita 
catarrh, bronchitis, asthma, catarrhal 
deafness, chronic colds, stopped-up 
feeling in nose and throat, dif.cult 
breathing, or any of the many symp- 
toms of catarrh. 

Dr. Blosser's Remedy is radically 
different from all others, being sim- 
ple, harmless, inexpensive and requir- 
ing no instrument or apparatus of any 
kind. 

If you wish a demonstration of whit 
this remarkable remedy will do, send 
your name and address to Dr. J. W. 
Blos'ser, 204 Walton street, Atlanta, 
Ga., and you will receive by return 
mail a free package and an illus- 
trated booklet. Write before you for> 
get it. 

Trinity College Notes. 

The students are now in the midst 
of mid-year examinations. The sec- 
ond' term will begin Monday, Febru- 
ary 1st. 

Dr. W. I. Cranford, of the Depart- 
ment Philosophy, left today for Wel- 
don,. where he will deliver an address 
tomorrow : oefc-re the county teachers' 
association. . 

Prof. A. H. Merritt delivered an ad- 
dress before the Edgcmont Graded 
School, and Prof. Edwin Mims before 

■ the West Durham Graded School in 
January 19. At each of these schools 
exercises were held in commemora- 
tion of Lee's birthday. 

Dr. W. P. Few has an engagement 
. to deliver an address at Elon College 
next Thursday evening oh Edgar AP 
lea Poe. This address was to have 
h?en" delj v ; ered last Tuesday evening, 
but -circumstances made it necessary 
- to postpone until- a later date. i« 
^ President KilgO has an engagement 
to preach next Sunday at Edentou 
i Street Methodist Church, Raleigh.' 
The college community is especial- 
ly, gratified by the re-election'of Hon. 
Lee-S, Overman to the United States 
Senate. The endorsement of the rec-' 
ord he has made as member of the 
national congress is a great honor 
to him," and the state is to be congrat- 
ulated that it has been so faithfully 
and creditably represented. -Mr. 
Overman is a graduate of Trinity, a 
member of the Board of Trustees, 
and President of the Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

Last Friday evening was "Poe 
night," with the Fortnightly Club, a 
local organization of the college. Mr. 
-~H. E. Spence read a paper on the 
."Poetry of, Poe." - Mr. E. S. Mcln- 

■ tosh > discussed "Poe as a Writer of 
Short Stories"; Mr. M. A. Briggs pre- 
sented "Tributes to- Poe." The occa- 
sion was a most interesting one. Pro- 
fessor W. H. Wannamaker presided 
at the meeting. 

At a recent meeting of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, the fol- 
lowing officers were elected, for the 
year: President, C. W. Fulford, of 
Georgia; Vice-President, Willis Smith 
of Elizabeth City; Treasurer, E. ' <l. 
Stephenson, of Fayetteville, Tenn:; 
^Secretary, W. G. Matton, of High 



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abide rather than those that perian 
with the using. A large heart rather 
than a large purse; a trained will 
rather than a crammed brain; worth 
rather than fame; undying deeds 
rather than fleeting words; power to 
souls for Him rather than to win 
friends for myself; faith rather than 
doctrines, hope rather than satisfac- 
tions, love rather than achievements. 

To remember: That, as God is in 
the material world fashioning his uni- 
verse, so is he in each human soul 
fashioning a man after his likeness; 
that all things, whether joy or sor- . 
row, success or disappointment, Vis- 
ions of the truth or veilings of the 
truth, are but elements in that.univer- • 
sal travail which is destined to work 
out a far more "exceeding weight, of 
glory than- has yet been revealed-, 
even in the glory of the only-bego|^n " 
Son of the Father. — Thomas Curtis 
Clark, in Evangelist. 



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14 



NOftTfl CAROLINA CHMSTIAN ADVOCATE. 



.'January 28, 1909. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY. 

N. B. — Following schedule figures pub- 
lished only as Information, and are not 
guaranteed: 

10:18 p. m. — No. 38, dally, New York and 
New Orleans Limited, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Pullman draw- 
ing room sleeping cars, observation, 
and club cars to New York. 

3:45 a. m. — No. 45, dally, Local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Atlanta and 
points south. 

4:10 a. m. — No. 38, dally, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles sleep- 
er for New York. 
12:45 a. m.— No. 112, dally, for Raleigh 
and Goldsboro. This train handles 
Pullman sleeper from Greensboro to 
Raleigh. 

7:10 a. m. — No. 8, dally, for Danville 
and Richmond. 

8:15 a. m.— No. 237, dally, for Winston- 
Salem and dally except Sunday for 
Wllkesboro. 

7:50 a. m. — No. 154, daily except Sunday, 
for Ramseur. 

7:20 a. m. — No. 37, dally, Washington 
and Southwestern Limited. Pullman 
drawing room sleeping cars, observa- 
tion and club cars New York to New 
Orleans. Pullman drawing room 
sleeping car New York to Atlanta. 
Solid Pullman train. Dining car ser- 
vice. 

7:50 a. m.— No. 11, daily for Charlotte 
and Atlanta, connecting for Asheville 
and Knoxville. 

9:25 a. m. — No. 44, dally, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles day 
coaches Atlanta to Washington. 

9:25 a. m. — No. 144, daily, for Durham, 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. 

1:15 p. m. — No. 36, dally, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles Pull- 
man drawing room sleeper New Or- 
leans to New York. Pullman drawing 
room sleeper Birmingham to Rich- 
mond, Va., and day coaches to Wash- 
ington. Dining car service. 
12:30 p. m. — No. 21, daily, for Salisbury 
and Asheville. Handles parlor car to 
Asheville. 

12:55 p. m. — No. 7, daily, local train for 
Charlotte. 

2:20 p. m. — No. 207, daily except Sunday, 
for Winston -Salem, making connec- 
tions for Wilkesboro. 
12:50 p. m.— No. 130, daily, for Sanford 
and intermediate points. Through for 
Fayetteville and Wilmington. 

3:20 p. m. — No. 22, daily, for Durham, 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. Handles par- 
lor car to Goldsboro. 

2:30 p. m. — No. 151, daily except Sunday, 
for Madison. 

3:30 p. m. — No. 230, dally except Sunday, 
for Ramseur. 

4:55 p. m.— No. 131, dally, for Mt. Airy. 

6:15 p. m. — No. 35, daily, for Atlanta and 
oolnts south. Pullman drawing n>om 
sleepers to New Orleans and Bir- 
mingham. Day coaches to New Or- 
leans. Dining car service. 

6:35 p. m.— No. 235, dally, for Winston- 
Salem. 

12:20 a. m. — No. 29, dally, for Columbia, 
Savannah and Jacksonville. Pullman 
drawing room sleeper and coach to 
Jacksonville. Dining car service. 

10:20 p. m. — No. 233, daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

9:35 p. m. — No. 12, daily, for Richmond 
and local points. Handles sleeper for 
Richmond. 

C. H. ACKERT, V. P. & G. M. 
S. H. HARDWICK, P. T. M. 
W. H. TAYLOE, G. P. A., 

Washington, D. C. 
R. L. VERNON, T. P. A., 

Charlotte, N. C. 
R. H. DeBUTTS, P. & T. A., 

Grei»nsb^ro. N. C. 



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This Great World History. 

SENT TO YOUR HOME FREE ^ 

Just send your name and address on the coupon below — that is all you need to do. It does 
not cost one penny and as soon as your name and address is received a set of the world famous 
Library of Universal History will be sent to you prepaid. 



HERE '* the K rcateB t opportunity ever ottered — an oppor- 
tunlty for our readers to secure at less than half price 
these fifteen beautiful volumes all printed from large new type, 
embellished with over 100 double page maps and plans, 700 full page 
illustrations, many of which are In colors, and over 5,000 pages of 
reading matter. 

This offer Is made possible by the failure of the publishers, the 
Union Book Co. of Chicago. Hundreds of sets of this work have 
been sold at $60.00 eaoh and they are worth every cent of It, but we 
now name you a rock-bottom bankrupt price of only 50c after ex- 
amination and $3.00 per month for 14 months. It is Impossible to 
name a lower price for cash In full, as this Is less than half the 
publisher's price and is made only to close out the few remaining 
sets quickly. 

Before you decide to buy we Invite you to examine this work in 
your own home for an entire week absolutely tree of charge, and 
should you not want the books after examination we will have 
them returned at our expense. We earnestly request you to ex- 
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No better set of books could be placed In the hands of children 
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connected History of every country, nation and people from the 
beginning of time to the present year; the grente.t World History 
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Prof. George Fellows, of Indiana, says: "Most histories of the 
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send the books back at our expense, and re- 
member, too. this bankrupt rock -bottom 
price of $28.50 for this $60.00 Library 
has been made possible only on ac- 
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YrVTYER, 
CHURCH' 



Mail Orders for Stationery Sent to The Christian Advocate, Receive Prompt Attention. Send for Samples and Prices 



fSSeSz Christian Atoocate 



H. M. BLAIR. Editor. I 
W. L. SHERRILL, Assistant. I 



ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE OF THE M. E. CHURCH, SOUTH. 



191. SO PER ANNUM - 
1 In Advwc< 



ESTABLISHED 1855. 



GREENSBORO, N. C, FEBRUARY 4, 1909. 



VOL. LIV.-NO. 5. 



OPPORTUNITY TO DO GOOD 



A word unsaid seems a little thing, 

But, alas, I may never know 
If the coming days to a soul may bring 

The truth that I fail to show. 

A song unsung seems a little thing, 
But the heart that I left today 

May pine for the songs that I did not sing, 
As it goes on its cheerless way. 



A deed undone seems a little thing, 

But the burden I might have shared 
Has left a heart with a bitter sting, 

Of the thought that "nobody cared." 

So the little things that we leave undone 

Are the things that men hold dear; 
Life's battles are reckoned lost or won 

By a smile, or a falling tear. 

— Edith Virginia Bradt. 



CT><5 



HAT ARE WE IN THIS WORLD FOR? TO 

Whave a good time? To fold our hands and sit 
down and wait for the sun to set? No. We are 
here to to do good. Why do we seek knowledge? 
Why do we read books? That we may be some- 

what distinguished above our neighbors? No. We 

should do these things to equip ourselves for use- 
fulness. The world needs men and women who are willing to 
serve. We have enough and more than enough who are seeking 
to be served, but where are they who will lay out their strength 
doing good to others? 

Opportunities to do good are everywhere, but they are not 
always recognized. When Isaac Watts was a youth he went to 
church with his father, and was thoroughly disgusted with the 
character of the hymns used in public worship, and ventured to 
criticize them severely. His father asked him what could be 
done about it. This challenge kindled into a flame the spark 
of genius in the breast of the young man, and he sat down and 
composed a hymn which he thought suitable for use in the con- 
gregation. That was the beginning of a life-work which has 
wonderfully enriched the hymnology of the Christian Church. 
Charles Wesley, Augustus Toplady, William Cowper, and other 
modern hymn-writers caught their inspiration from Isaac Watts 
and lighted their torches at the flame he kindled. He saw his 
opportunity, and improved it. 

Solomon says, "The wise man's eyes are in his head; but 
the fool walketh in darkness. ' ' If Isaac Newton had been a fool 
the apple falling at his feet would have been nothing more than 
an unimportant accident. But the man whose eyes were in his 
head saw back of that phenomenon a profound principle, and 
he did not rest until he had discovered and made known to the 
world the secret of the order of the material universe. He had 
eyes to see his opportunity and a soul to improve it. Colum- 
bus also saw that the time was ripe for the enlargement of the 
boundaries of man's knowledge of the world he inhabits. Gal- 
ileo saw that behind the vibration of a chandelier there was a 
great principle which the world was waiting to comprehend. 
Florence Nightingale heard of the sufferings of the soldiers in 
the camp and in the hospital, and her heart was touched as the 
heart of any woman would be touched. But she saw an oppor- 
tunity to help suffering humanity, and out of that thought a 



great benevolent movement has grown. She saw her oppor- 
tunity to do good and did it. 

Do we see our opportunity ? Are we looking for it ? Will we 
embrace it if it shall be made known to us? 

Youth is an opportunity to do good. It has been dinned 
into the minds of young people that youth is an opportunity to 
prepare to do good, but how few of them imagine that it is a 
fine opportunity to be useful? The influence of young people 
over young people is amazing. If it were used for good, how 
much better the world would be. Education is an opportunity 
to do good. It is not merely a little polish. It is an equipment 
for service. An educated mind is worth more than all the dia- 
monds in South Africa. Office in church and state is an oppor- 
tunity to do good. Too many look on it merely as an opportun- 
ity to gratify a worldly ambition or an opportunity for graft. 
One seeks to be mayor, not because he thinks he can preside over 
the affairs of the municipality better than anyone else, but be- 
cause he longs to be addressed as "mayor." One seeks to be 
bishop, not because he honestly thinks he can manage ecclesias- 
tical affairs better than others or oversee the flock of God bet- 
ter than others, but because he longs to be called "bishop," and 
to enjoy the honors and emoluments of the office. It is not the 
opportunity of service that is sought, but the honor. 

Wealth is an opportunity to do good. Poverty and affliction 
afford a fine opportunity to do good. The times in which we 
live are fraught with opportunity to do good. Our fathers did 
much for the world with their meager facilities, how much more 
may we do with the amazing facilities of this day! They were 
compelled to trudge on their weary way in the old stage coach, 
while we may fly all abroad on the wings of the lightning. The 
Christian religion furnishes the finest opportunity to do good 
the world has ever seen. If there were no other reason why 
one should be a Christian, this one thing, that thereby one may 
serve his generation more effectually than in any other way, is 
enough. Think of the forces it puts in the hands of the fel- 
lowers of Jesus: the knowledge of things unseen, the power 
of prayer, the power of Christian character. Equipped with 
these spiritual forces, anyone may go forth like the apostles of 
our Lord, and shake the gates of hell and make the wilderness 
sing for joy. "As we have therefore opportunity, let us do 
good." — New York Christian Advocate. 



2 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 4, 1909. 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 

Entered according to the Postal -Laws and Regula- 
tions in the Post Office in Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year............'. ?1.50 

Six Months 75 

To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.00 a year. 

Office: 110 East Gaston Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

This paper will be continued to subscribers at 
the expiration of the time paid for unless the office 
is notified to the contrary. Watch your label, and 
unless you intend to pay for the paper, do not allow 
it to be delivered to you over the time; If you wish 
your paper discontinued, notify us by postal card. 



; EDITORIAL. 

We are indebted to Rev. W. L. Cuninggim, the 
faithful and efficient secretary, for a copy of the 
minutes of ' the North Carolina Conference. The 
seventy-second session was held in Durham Decem- 
ber 9 to l'4 ; 1908. This copy of the journal is a 
model of neatness, reflecting great credit on both 
the secretaiiy .who edited and Edwards, Broughton 
& Co., who did the printing. 

* * * 

We have had time only to make a hurried exami- 
nation of tlie journal, but have been much inter- 
ested in comparing note£ in some particulars with 
our own Conference journal. For instance, they 
report 74,548 members and local preachers, while 
we report 86,543. They have nine presiding elders, 
receiving last year an average salary of a little 
more than $1,800, while we have eleven receiving 
last year an* average of a little ov-er $1,500. They 
have one hundred and eighty-one pastors who re- 
ceived last year an average salary of about $750,- 
while we h|ive 220 ' pastoral charges paying last 
year an averkge of about. $625. In both Conferences 
there are signs of progress and much to encourage, 
for which all North Carolina Methodists should be 
devoutly thankful. . 

One thing *that will impress the reader on a com- 
parison of these journals is the fact that the North 
Carolina Conference has not multiplied pastoral 
charges by cutting up and dividing as we have. This 
explains largely the fact that the average salary 
paid the pastors in that Conference is so much 
larger than durs. We are suffering in many places 
because we jhave had too much division. The re- 
sult is that w ; e have not 'the men to supply so many 
charges, while' many of the men. we have are suf- 
fering because of too meager support. It is cruel 
to our men to; require them to go to a field and re- 
main there y|hen there is no hope of adequate 

support. if «d "*•■ ! ' •"'* 

| / y I 

|] a case; in. point. , $ 

The recentj calamity which befell the people of 
Southern Italy! has afforded an opportunity for the 
demonstration; ;of Christian charity. Over $3,000,000 
have been contributed for the relief of the earth- 
quake sufferers, and of this amount nearly 
one-half was ! given by, .tire people of the United 
States. It is significant that- the .largest expression 
of sympathy jdame across the Atlantic from Protr 
testant America. It is 1 safe' to say that no "pagan 
country has iiade an - effort to relieye the suffer-' 
ing caused bjiithe disastrous earthquake. 

Christianity^ the one religion which recognizes 
the brotherhood of the race and the only one that 
puts into the. heart of humanity the impulse of 
charity. So while we look with' horror on the awful 
visitation of calamity, may we not see in it the 
providential o-pportunity for •■ the demonstration of 
that spirit of llove that Christ came to, teach? Jesus 
said of the man born blind, "Neither hath this, man 
sinned nor his parents; but that the works of God 
should be made manifest in him." There is some- 
how, in the providence of God, a disguised blessing 
even in the catastrophes which cause human suffer- 
ing, and the appeal is not made in vain to Chris- 
tians and Christian nations. 

WHAT SHALL BE OUR POLICY? 

We raise this question with reference to our pros- 
pective Children's Home. The trustees have, we un- 
derstand, appointed a building committee and plans 
will soon be drawn for the first buildings. 

Right in the beginning we desire to put in a plea 
for a Children's Home as far removed from the 
prison idea as possible. It w ; ill be a great mistake 



to build large structures of many stories and crowd 
the children into these like so many hapless jail- 
birds. Their condition is pathetic enough without 
adding the horror of being imprisoned for years dur- 
ing the formative period of childhood. 

Of course it would be more expensive in adminis- 
tration, but the benefit to. be derived will justify 
increased expense in order to place children in such 
small groups in cottages as to make them seem like 
isolated families. There should be no thought of 
detaining children in an orphanage on any other 
than the cottage plan. But why detain them at all 
longer than it may require to find for them homes 
in Christian families? By all means let our Chil- 
dren's Home be arranged so that those who are 
detained there may find it as nearly approaching the 
ideal home as possible, but, first of all, let it be 
the policy of the management to place out as many 
as can be provided for in real homes, where they 
may be brought up under the normal conditions of a 
real home. There is nothing that tends to develop 
real manhood and womanhood more than the influ- 
ence of a Christian home, while nothing gives a 
surer prophecy of failure in life than the lack of 
such influence. Let our orphanage set the good 
example of giving emphasis to the work of finding 
homes for these unfortunate ones. 



THE SUNDAY SCHOOL AND SOUL-WINNING. 

The one great opportunity for soul-saving which 
overshadows all others is the Sunday school. It 
has required nearly two centuries to bring the 
Church up to anything like an adequate conception 
of its opportunity in this respect. The earlier con- 
ception of the Sunday-school was rather secular 
than spiritual, and there still remain many who 
have not fully conceded the spiritual function of 
the Sunday-school teacher. 

There is, however, little division now among those 
who take active part in promoting the Sunday-school 
work as to the providential call to make it first of 
all a soul-saving agency. This being true, every 
teacher should feel very sensibly the responsibility 
which rests upon him in reference to the personal 
salvation of every pupil under his care. He should 
know that in whatever else he may fail there can 
be no excuse for a failure to deliver his soul in 
prayerful effort to lead each pupil to an experimen- 
tal knowledge of sins forgiven. 

With this conviction of his duty and responsibility 
each teacher should be as careful of his preparation 
as the minister who goes to his pulpit every Sunday 
morning. He can no more afford to allow himself 
to go before his class without earnest prayer for the 
salvation of his pupils than can the preacher with- 
out earnest prayer for the awakening and conver- 
sion of the unsaved in his congregation. In fact we 
believe that the key to the mighty, sweeping revival 
which we so much need everywhere, is held by the 
teachers in our Sunday schools. Suppose each one 
of this great army 'were to get upon his heart the 
burden of the souls committed to him. Suppose 
they were to become seized with the conviction that 
they must be under God the instrument or agency 
through which these are to be led to salvation, so 
that day and night they would cry unto God for it; 
would there not be the condition for the most 
sweeping revival this world ever witnessed? With 
all the improvement that we have witnessed in the 
work of the Sunday-school in the last quarter of a 
century, we fear that the weakest point is our 
failure to utilize the opportunity as we should in 
saving the souls of those committed to us. "He 
that wipneth souls is wise," and there is none 
wiser than the Sunday-school teacher who knows 
how to make the most of his opportunity in soul- 
saving. ' " . ■ ■ .. .- . ,!. 



THE PROBLEM OF THE UNEMPLOYED. 

We have heard much during the season of. finan- 
cial depression about the unemployed, and there is 
no doubt, that. the. multitudes of wage-earners have 
felt the situation keenly. But there is always this 
problem of the unemployed, and in times such as 
we have been passing through, especially, this cry 
is "worked for more than it is worth, and the public 
generally should be warned not to expend their 
sympathy^ or cash trying to champion the cause of 
thousands of good-for-nothings who are always suf- 
fering from hard times and panics brought about by 
themselves. The country is full of men out of a job 
for the most part because they have not been 
willing to show the industrious turn which would 
make their employment of any advantage to their 
employer. 

The editor of the Western Christian" Advocate 
says what we desire to say in the following, which 



deserves to be carefully read, marked and inwardly 
digested: , a 

.'•''Unemployment,' it is to be feared, is becom- 
ing almost a fad in some communities. In Cincin- 
nati, the other day, just after a heavy snowfall, 
when a good, able-bodied man could have earned 
any amount of money shoveling paths, the 'unem- 
ployed' were holding a 'meeting' in the Vine Street 
Congregational church. Such weighty topics as 
clean bed linen in lodging houses, and the quality 
of free soup were discussed, and by the time the as- 
sembly adjourned, a lot of honest fellows who were 
not afraid of work, had pocketed amounts ranging 
all the way up to five dollars. 

"This endless talk, talk, talk, is not going to 
solve the problem of unemployment. There is a 
time for talk, but there is a time for work, too, and 
a six-inch snowfall ought to be regarded by the man 
out of a job as a dispensation of Providence. 

"For many wage-earners these times doubtless 
may be hard. It may be true that many laborers 
have been laid off, and that good jobs are just now 
at a premium. It may be necessary for a man to 
run fast after a coal wagon if he wants to be em- 
ployed at putting in the coal. At the same time, 
if he gets there first, he is hardly liable to be 
spending the remainder of his life doing the same 
kind of work. 

"The trouble is, with many of the 'unemployed,' 
that they are not 'men' out of work, but butchers, 
bakers and candlestick makers looking for a job. 
Not finding any vacancies to their liking, they be- 
come professional chair-warmers. They are too 
proud, they say, to accept charity. They are like- 
wise too proud to shovel snow, wash dishes, or to 
put in coal. They like to speak in meeting and 
tell what they would do under certain circum- 
stances, but they do not work. It is the same ex- 
cuse that the tramp gives when he wants a hand- 
out. He can not get work at his 'occupation.' Aak 
him what his occupation is. In the winter it is 
mowing lawns; in the summer it is shoveling snow. 

"We have carefully modified our statements. 
Doubtless there are many .honest and honorable 
men who are out of work and suffering, who would 
gladly accept any employment by which they could 
earn their bread; and they would work at it faith- 
fully. They deserve great sympathy, but should be 
helped as soon as possible to help themselves." 



NOTES AND PERSONALS. 

— Rev. and Mrs. H. H. Robbins, of Statesville, 
visited at Maiden for a few days last week. 

— We are glad to learn that Dr. V. J. Palmer, of 
Polkville, who has been seriously ill for some time, 
is much improved. 

— Rev. E. M. Hoyle, of the North Carolina Con- 
ference, and pastor at Lumberton, is now in the 
midst of a revival meeting. 

— <Capt. G. T. Roth and family have gone to Flor- 
ida, where they will spend the remainder of the 
winter. They left last week. — Elkin Times. 

— Rev. R. L. Fruit, of the Coleridge circuit, writes 
that he is in the midst of a gracious revival at Col- 
eridge. The services were continued from the quar- 
terly meeting. 

— The many friends of Hon. M. O. Sherrill will 
be sorry to know that he has been right sick at his 
home in Raleigh. We trust this good brother may 
soon be entirely well again. 

— On Friday evening of last week Rev. W. O. Da- 
vis, pastor of Carraway Memorial, at White Oak, 
and family were generously pounded by members of 
his congregation and other friends. 

— -On Wednesday of last eek Capt. John A. Ram- 
say, one of the best known citizens of Salisbury, 
passed away in that city. Captain Ramsay was a 
Confederate veteran and had many friends through- 
out the state. 

— Mrs. Kirby, wife of Rev. George F. Kirby, is 
reported to be getting on as well as could be ex- 
pected. Her condition is now favorable. She is 
still at St. Leo's Hospital, and will likely remain 
there for some time. 

— -Rev. L. T. Cordell will begin a meeting at the 
Methodist church here next Sunday, January 31. He 
will preach at 11 o'clock a. m. and at night. The 
meeting will continue through the week following. — 
Marshaville Our Home. 

— A press correspondent writing from Thomas- 
ville, says: "The North Thomasville Methodist con- 
gregation is building a beautiful $2,000 parsonage 
on .the lot recently given it by Mr. J. E. Wyche, 
near the center of town. Work has already started 
on the building, and it will be completed this spring. 

— At an. informal conference at Main Street Meth- 
odist church Wednesday night, it was decided to 
tear away the old parsonage and build a comforta- 



♦ 



February 4, 1909. 



NOtlTtt^MbWk CtmT^TAN ADVOCATE. 



ble modern parsonage of not less than nine rooms. 
The matter is to be submitted to the congregation 
as a whole next Sunday morning.^-Webster' , s" 
Weekly. '*•'*•' ' 

—Rev. Dr. J. C. Rowe, presiding elder -"'of- the 
Salisbury district, was in the city on Friday of" last 
week and made a much appreciated call at the Ad- 
vocate office. Dr. Rowe reports everything moving' 
on pleasantly on the Salisbury district. He is :; 'just 
completing his first round. 

— Capt. J. W. Todd, of Jefferson, Ashe- "Comity, 
passed away at his home' in that place "6n 'Wednes- 
day of last week. Captain Todd was a gallant"' of- 
ficer in the Confederate army and had a wide circle- 



srs get closer to nature, stating that unless this 
was done the American nation would do as other 
nations' had done— fall while at the height of its 
civilization. He urged that the people go back to 
'fife farm for moral strength and to have a closer 
contact with nature. 

" ; — RevVDr. T. N. Ivey, editor of the Raleigh Chris- 
"tian Advocate, was in the city on Thursday of last 
week and made the Advocate office a pleasant calh 
Dr. I'vey'was' brought up in the western part of tht 
State, arid naturally feels a very keen interest in 
-ail'th'at occurs on this side of the line. He is mak- 
ing a fine' paper -for his Conference, but admits that 
in the matter of circulation we have about over- 



of friends. The Advocate joins in expressions of' taken' him. ' Now why should we not lead in circu- 
sympathy for the bereaved family. ••' lafion since -we 'have some 12,000 more members 

— Rev. A. S. Raper, of East Greensboro' charge, than they have. Let every pastor hustle for the 
was called to his old home in Davidson comity last ' next six weeks and we can possibly for the first 



week on account of the illness of his father, who is 
not expected to survive long. He is more than eighty 
years old and has been failing for some" time." ' •' **• 
— We learn with sorrow of the death of Mr. Lbgan 
B. Abernethy, of Rutherford College. ' " He was^the 
father of Rev. R. S. Abernethy, of our' Conference; 
and brother of the late Dr. R. L: Abernethy,' presi- 
dent and founder of Rutherford College. ; Ift%a§ a 



time say that' we have distanced the "Old Raleigh." 
— ■— A correspondent of the daily press writing from 
WilSon on this 29th -inst, - says: "Rev. G. F. Smith, 
pastor Of the Wilson Methodist church, who was 
called to the sick bedside of his aged father, Mr. 
Alfred " Smith, who resides at Jackson Hill, in Da- 
'vidsb'tf' "county, returned to his charge today. He 
■i aYs his father, who is now eighty-five years old, lies 



good man and leaves to his children- the 'heritage lii a" critical condition, and that he would not be 
of a good name. -- : **6s* - s "'"stff prised at any {ime to receive tidings of his 
— Prof. J. A. Bivins, who was some tihre %g6" df- " ''cteath. 'The only nourishment , the old gentleman 
fered the position of supervisor of thcv ribrmtff" work ' "has-been able to retain for the past twenty-five days 
of the Department of Education at 'Rareigfi, "'has " J n'as -been milk. Paralysis of the bowels seems to be 
been partially released by the graded sch'661' bdkfd ' the trouble, and his prysician says that on several 
in order that he may begin his- new ''wOrk. '- He" will" former occasions Mr. Smith- received -slight strokes 
give each Friday and Saturday- to 'the- wOrk'at' Ral J -"- ; of i?ixralysis.-'t: '.v.' as 2 i 

eigh till April 1st, when he will be' releaseo ehtfrel'y^"' " ^-RevrJ. W. Heidt, D. D., one of the leading mem- 
from the work here. — Monroe Journal'. 1 ^ u ~'" 1 ;i 'b^Vs' -6 : f 'thesfiiNorth Georgia Conference, and for 

— Rev. J. A. Bowles, of West Green'sborb' 'charge^ , '' J nYariy' years ite^secretary, died at his home, near At- 
is having a beautiful calendar printed at the S'dvo- ""laiita; on;* January 4v234 after a. brief illness. Dr. 
cate office which he will distribute among 1 h'is'pec^ 'Heldt 'iva's at- the tteie of • his. death the presiding 
pie. The calendar shows the date and hour -of e'acri' '%ldcr of 'the lAugusta^district. He was about sixty- 
preaching service as well as the Sund'ay>schbrjl, h&£* ? ' seven' years old, and had been an active itinerant 
the picture of the pastor, is printed- in" colors^aird' since 1SG6. He -gave. some; years of service to school 
will be a valuable souvenir of his Work. 'The wOfk'in' (Georgia- aiid later in Texas, where he was 
pense is insignificant and other preachers'" wrJuld do ''-rfegenf {fr Southwestern University. He had been at 
well to follow his example. - " •>* ui 1 ' - different times one of 'the assistant secretaries of 

— Rev. B. F. Hargett, pastor of our church at t'bte GfSneril Conference. His was a large and gen- 
Wilkesboro, reports everything moving oh pleasant-' %r6us nature'.-.,. His face disclosed a sunny view of 
ly and satisfactorily in his char^/'- ,, tte*lrepbr , ts*'d' i, 4i^r'aiia' hisufceanty -laugh- was always infectious. — 
live Woman's Home Mission Society ^ and"" J EpW6^?tH "''Nashvilft' Advocate. .: - 

League, and that the young men and wom'e 1 h'"6f the"' 1 '' ■" ' ' " ■>•- ■ - - - - .<■. 

town have united in the organization"^ 1 a-'ChrlS-^"""-* ' 
tian Endeavor Society: The" pe<^le n havff'' ; shfrira v ' 5 '" " 



THE' CHILDREN'S HOME. 
Treasurer's Report. 



great kindness to the pastor by geheroUs'poUndihgsr '™ j^y irtfovember 
Best of all, he reports conversions -an^dnitiorts: to- ;> re 4usly' retried r 
the church at regular services. •••• a sea*** 'wjj^g Si~i ' "" "" ' '" ' 

—Since the death of Rev. Dr. SahiuolM.ahfterY tKe liberty " ^'"*' ; ' "" ' "" " " 

founder of Lander College, Greenwood, 8?fj.fWiiir , %^S^ 1 ^i|^V 
been the custom to observe January 30, .b^birth- ygg* ^ ^Qircutt [[]]['.'.:. 
day, with appropriate exercises. "On- test' ^u* aa .y Bethel "g^joft-' i W - '■ - 
evening, January 30, at the college ^Gr^ehw^bd* * : sJ - -'^ ' ' •" 

S. C., Prof. J. G. Clinkscales, of Wofford^Co'llege 1 , "' f^V^k^ "ivv V;^ ; v T " 
delivered the address and Rev W, Merrill; oar" Snow Hm> g ^ Springs' Circuit 
junior editor, read the sketch.of the life of^, Lan-,: Randleman , SL Taui's '\ ° ' 
der, printed on our fourth page. . Dr. Lande^. .w : as . -ghdal" Creek "*''' ffi " ' " ' =• 
a native North Carolinian, and well' and '"favorably '„. Z 1,^, jjiiiVjii.' •."'*:' 'iW-'.r.' " 

..mtm .W :-<filast- Be»d< Macedonia 

known to many of our readers. ., ,„. . w ,-„;.,- , - . ^. . 

n i . , , x • ■ MA* ^.ii-i-- ''¥an<ierbuf%, Troutman Circuit 

— Great sympathy is felt m Greensboro and vicin- 
ity for Mrs. J. B. Scarboro, in the death of h.eyr son, 
Mr. A. E. Scarboro, who died in San tean'drb^ QjiC, ' 
on Wednesday morning of last week. Mr.,.' Scarboro 
had been in failing health for several! months and 
went to California last fall with the hope of ^repov- 
ering his health. His wife, who was .the daughter 
of Rev. Dr. Frank H. Wood, died some two' years ' 
ago. He was a young man of exemplary character, 
a member of West Market Street church, and had 
many friends who will be grieved to hear of his 
death. . ■: •. ., -- s i „ >.*'■ - 



— We are glad to learn from press reports that 
Prof. M. A. Yost, so long and favorably known ai a , , ,. . ;] 
member of the faculty of Weaverville College; was' ^ 

last week elected president of the -college." Th-er'e iV^h \ v 

no better man in the world than- Prof .Yost, 'and tie' *| ™ "™ <VifJ- ' " 1 

has been thoroughly trained in- the practical %ofTt / vfflW* t^c ' ' 

of the college for some twenty ifb^^^m^tW^^^^tt^^ ' 

press correspondent says: "Professor- Yost -has-'been 'A'l/r*'' ' W$&'* V ''■ ' "■' 

connected with the college -for the- past tw^t^'^'^^^^' ' ' ' • ' 

years. He was for nearly ten years '--pfe&idfeM- 1 boi °2#£.. '-■l c ^-.£.:. ' V.'*' •' " ii--* •* 

. „,„ .„. ,, ... Randleman, NaofQi 

mg elected soon after the organization of the col- -vw .„ a. : 

lege. He was appointed president nra .tern." . wbetf * m -x r - •-. \ L- " 

President Abernethy resigned in, December.'** - t: .^'iu e i Ll f" <1 -..V " • 

^spencer . .... 

-Rev. Dr. John C. Kilgo, president *f Trinity : Wj £? p^aht, fcltmore Circuit.; 
College, delivered an address at the A. 'fe^Mr-'Ool- '-'^ntiocn, riuWi 'Yjalf Circuit ... . 
lege for. the Colored Race in this ;: cityr ori' ; Fridair-^i^ ^gj. k - J -' 1 """ " 

right of last week. His subject was "Civilization, Norwood '''' -'' ' ' '' '""' 

snd the speaker was given an -enthusiastic- leafing, ^ntenaryi Davidson Circuit ' Y. V 
As is always the case, Dr. Kilgo talked- good hard 'fe^gn '"Circuit^'f '. '.. . . ' 
sense. Among other things he urged that his hear- 



$114.02 

. .. ; 2.21 

1.S5 

.... 1.10 
.GO 

..... 1.50 

1.1.02 

... . ' 1.03 
.... 90 

..jy . jr. 50 
Ifk. l.po 
. .2^10 

.J'.? ' "L22 
.... " 1.02 
40 
.88 

fi . 2,00 
... . .. . 1.00 

1.13 

. . 1.00 
.30 
.48 

.... 16.82 

. 15.25 

1.68 

2.5.5 
12.36 

j| Grove, ; Table' Rdck 'Circuit 1.07 

1.65 
.45 

.... 4.00 
2.68 
.... .1.00 
... 11.35 
... 1.56 
... 6.50 
s ".'.:'; 3.18 
... 8.40 
'. T. 2.55 
. . .. 3.50 
4.50 
. . . 10.00 ' 
.60 

. . 2.00 



. : Giike7'-'( A 

Hildebrand>' . ". '. .'. .', .... .'.' 
Gftin;«,.:;:. a/- . .';?. \V. . . . . 

■mt. mu »a . . . . ................... 

-PahnJTree-/ Souffi' Fort 'Circuit 
:■Le.banon:' ! . , '-^'. . .'i .' . . 

Charlotte- i- ! . '.*:\' 

:,Palnaerv-ilfe ; . '. .'!', . . .'. . ". .'.". .... 
Salem/ ForIet' : City' Circuit. ......... 

Statesville, BrSad Steet '. 

Merita .].\ I . 

Ziqn, Haywood "Circuit '. . . , 

Asbury, Sulphur Springs Circuit ... 



Wilkes Circuit 3.15 

Brevard 1.64 

Swannanoa Circuit 5.00 

Lenoir Circuit 9.24, 

Moore's Chapel, Mt. Holly Circuit 4.50 

Salisbury, Baraca Class 10.00 

Pleasant Grove 80 

Moore's Grove, Hendersonville Circuit 2.00 

Pleasant Garden 1.00 

Arney's Chapel, Table Rock Circuit 2.20 

Albemarle 3.44 

Danbury 2.90 

Madison 4.37 

Greensboro, Spring Garden 4.44 

Pleasant Garden 6.86 

Total $331.75 

Thanksgiving Offering. 

Thermal City $ 2.00 

Lenoir 21.92 

Bethany 4.70 

Waynesville 6.75 

Greensboro, Centenary 3.81 

Tryon and Saluda 4.29 

Shelby ,. 31.17 

Shoal Creek 3.10 

Rutherford College 5.00 

Morganton 30.00 

Mocksville 6.00 

Mt. Pleasant 9.87 

Greensboro, Spring Garden 4.01 

Gastonia 4.-20 

Danbury 1.10 

Total $137.92 

Other Contributions. 

G. C. Goodman, Kanapolis charge $ 5.00 

Mrs. C. G. Barrett, Leicester Circuit 1.00 

Frank Gurrley, High Point 10.00 

J. P. Rodgers, agent 231.00 

Total ' '.$247.00 

Grand total 700.67 

G. F. IVY, Treasurer. ' 
Hickory, N. C, Jan. 31, 1909. 



CAMPAIGN FOR NEW SUBSCRIBERS. 

Report to February 2nd, 1909. 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT. 

Riverside, A. E. Harrison 1 

Weaverville, T. E. Smiley 6 

CHARLOTTE DISTRICT. 

Dilworth, A. L. Coburn 1 

\Vadesboro, J. H. West 1 

Tryon Street, G. H. Detwiler 1 

Trinity, E. L. Bain 9 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT. 

Coleridge, R. L. Fruit 3 

Pleasant Garden, R. A. Taylor 1 

Washington Street, J. Ed. Thompson.. 2 

South Main Street, O. P. Ader 3 

MORGANTON DISTRICT. 

Cliffside, S. E. Richardson 2 

Rutherford College, W. E. Poovey...... dy 2 



12 



m 



Cola" Springs .'.' . .' 2.36 



SALISBURY DISTRICT. 

Albemarle Circuit, J. T. Stover 1 

First Church, S. B. Turrentine 1 

Woodleaf, E. G. Pusey 3 

SHELBY DISTRICT. 
Cherry ville_ Circuit, A. C. Swofford 1^ 

STATESVILLE DISTRICT. 

Lenoir Circuit, J. O. Erwin 13 

Rock Spring, W. F. Elliott 1 

Hickory, Phoenecia Britten 1 

WINSTON DISTRICT. 

Summerfield Circuit, C. P. Goode 1 

Walnut Cove, C. H. Clyde 2 

WAYNESVILLE DISTRICT. 

Waynesville, J. H. Barnhardt 1 

Jonathan Circuit, J. B. Hyder 11 

Sulphur Springs, J. W. Campbell 5 

Bethel, C. A. Swift 9 

West Asheville, R. E. Atkinson 1 

MT. AIRY DISTRICT. 

Rcckford Circuit, T. J. Houck 13 

Grand total 



15 



27 



13 



98 



I. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 4, 1909. 



dents is but the sentiment of the many women 
whose characters have been strengthened through 
contact with this noble man. He was all of a 
gentleman, all of a scholar, and all of a Christian, 
cultured, chivalrous, consecrated. There were 
blended in him in just proportion those elements 
which go to make a nobleman. 

North Carolina has furnished to the church and 
state a large number of useful men who have dis- 
tinguished themselves In peace and war, but I 
am sure that few of her sons, when final results 
are measured, have rendered to mankind a service 
bo far-reaching and uplifting as did this humble 
and unpretentious but truly great man, who to 
the end of his days was busy in season and out of 
season, striving to prepare the young women of the 
land for larger life and nobler service. He is no 
longer with us, but his holy in uence abides and 
his work continues, for when God buries the work- 
man he still carries on the work. 



P. S. — I made an error in saying I had paid into 
Brotherhoods for 30 years — it should have been 

24 years instead. H. F. C. 



A PICTURE OF GOD. 



S. D. Gordon. 



REV. R. M. TAYLOR AND THE BROTHERHOOD. 



I beg, Mr. Editor, space for a few words in ref- 
erence to Brother Taylor's article in last week's 
Advocate. Letters have poured in from all di- 
rections making various inquiries anent the Meth- 
odist Benevolent Association and the Brotherhood. 
In all my replies I have advised no one to leave 
the Association. A number, like myself, have with- 
drawn, and at their suggestion, I have undertaken 
the re-organization of our conference brotherhood. 
Not that said Brotherhood has ever disbanded. 
We have considered the organization intact as an 
auxiliary to the Methodist Benevolent Association, 
but the term re-organization refers to a re-adjust- 
ment of the articles of organization to suit lay and 
clerical as suggested in this week's Advocate in 
the outlined constitution. 

In this I am trying as best I can to devise some 
way of undoing any wrong that I may have done 
in advising the merging of our Brotherhood in the 
Methodist Benevolent Association. Some of these 
brethren are invalids, others worn out and aged. 
Their income will not warrant the increased as- 
sessments adopted by the association. If I can 
succeed in inducing a few hundred laymen to be- 
come interested, I can make it alike beneficial to 
lay and clerical to join our re-organized brother- 
hood. 

Brother Taylor says 'Brother Chreitzberg says 
he has been paying into some Brotherhood for thir- 
ty years, only to let it lapse at last. This is just 
where I think he made the mistake. He let it 
lapse. Why not keep it up?" To this I reply, sim- 
ply because I could not afford it. I do not often 
jump with my eyes shut. To continue with the 
Association I would be required to pay at my age 
153.20. If the payment were made quarterly it 
would be $56.00, or $14.00 each payment. This 
$56.00 would have to be paid as long as I lived. 
Upon consultation with insurance tables I found 
that if I would invest $56.00 annually at 7 per cent, 
compound interest, that in ten years I would have 
$945.28; in twelve years, $1,071.84; in twenty years 
$2,456.16; but if I remained in the association 
twenty years I would have paid in in fact the 
equivalent of $2,456.16, while my estate would real- 
ize only $1,000. In other words, I would have paid 
$1,456.16 for the privilege of letting my estate 
receive $1,000. But should I drop out for inability 
to meet the annual payment (or quarterly assess- 
ments) my estate would get nothing; on the other 
hand, if I should take the business method of in- 
vesting my own money at 7 per cent, compound in- 
terest at any stage I, or in the event of my death 
my estate, would draw all put in and its accumula- 
tions. How does Brother Taylor like that for bus- 
iness? Remember the re-organization of the as- 
sociation is on a business and not a benevolent 
plan. Its purpose now is to create a large sinking 
fund. 

Again: If I desire a paid-up policy at my age 
I can get a $1,000 for $660.73 cash payment; $284.- 
55 cheaper than if I should run with the Associa- 
tion ten years, and only the remotest chance of its 
being lost. 

Brother Taylor at his age will pay $46.00 an- 
nually into the re-organized association, which, at 
7 per cent, in ten years, will be equivalent to 
$776.48; or in twenty years, $2,017.56, anly at the 
end of those periods to let his family receive $1,- 
000.00. Is it the wise thing for him to run counter 
to the facts unless, he has money to burn? 

Mr. Editor, my explanation is made. Thank you 
for courtesies. This may wake up snakes; how- 
eyer let them come. 

H. F. CHREITZBERG. 



It is fairly pathetic what a stranger God is In 
his own world. He comes to his own, and they 
who are his own kinsfolks keep him standing out- 
side the door while they peer suspiciously at him 
through the crack at the hinges. 

To know God really, truly, is the beginning of 
a normal life. One of the best pictures of God 
that I ever saw came to me in a simple story. 
It was of a man, a minister, who lived in a New 
England town. He had a son, about fourteen 
years of age', going to school. One afternoon the 
boy's teacher called at the home and asked for 
the father, and said: 

"Is your boy sick?" 

"No. Why?" 

"He was not at school today." 

"Is that so?" 

"Nor yesterday." 

"You don't mean it!" 

"Nor the day before." 

"Well!" 

"And I supposed he was sick." 
"No, he's not sick." 
"Well, I thought I would tell you." 
And the father said, "Thank you," and the teach- 
er left. 

Add the father sat thinking. By and by he 
heard a click at the gate, and he knew the boy 
was coming, so he went to open the door. And 
the boy knew as he looked up that his father 
knew about those three days.. And the father 
said: 

"Come into the library, Phil." And Phil went, 
and the door was shut. And the father said: 
"Phil, your teacher was here this afternoon. He 
tells me you were not at school today . . nor 
yesterday . . nor the day before. And we sup- 
posed you were. You let us think you were. And 
you do not know how badly I feel. I have always 
trusted you. I have always said, 'I can trust my 
boy Phil.' And here you've been a living lie for 
three whole days. And I can't tell you how badly 
I feel about it." 

Well, that was hard on Phil to be talked to 
quietly like that. If his father had spoken to 
him roughly, or — had asked him out to the wood- 
shed for a confidential interview, it would not have 
been nearly so hard. Then, after a moment's 
pause, the father said, "Phil, we'll get down and 
pray." And the thing was getting harder for Phil 
all the time. He didn't want to pray just then. 
And they got down. And the father poured out 
his heart in prayer. And the boy knew as he lis- 
tened how badly his father felt over his conduct. 
Somehow he saw himself in the mirror on his 
knees as he had not before. It's queer about that 
mirror of the knee-joints. It does show many 
things. Many folks don't like it. 

And they got up. And the father's eyes were 
wet. And Phil's eyes were not dry. Then the 
father said: 

"My boy, there's a law of life that where there 
is sin, there is suffering. You can't detach those 
two things. Where there is suffering there has 
been sin somewhere. And where there is sin there 
will be suffering. You can't get those two things 
apart. Now," he went on, "you have done wrong. 
And I am in this home like God is in the world. 
So we will do this. You go up to the attic. I'll 
make a pallet for you there. We'll take your 
meals up to you at the regular times, and you stay 
up there as long as you have been a living lie — 
three days and three nights." 

And Phil didn't say a word. They went up- 
stairs, the pallet was made, and the father kissed 
his boy and left him alone with his thoughts. Sup- 
per time came, and the father and mother sat 
down to eat. But they couldn't eat for thinking 
about the boy. The longer they chewed upon 
the food, the bigger and drier it got in their 
mouths. And swallowing it was clear out of the 
question. Then they went into the sitting room 
for evening. He picked up the evening paper to 
read, and she sat down to sew. Well, his eyes 
were not very good. He wore glasses. And this 
evening he couldn't seem to see distinctly — the 
glasses seemed blurred. It must have been the 
glasses, of course. So he took them off and clean- 
ed them very deliberately and then found that he 



had been holding the paper upside down. And she 
tried to sew. But the thread broke, and she 
couldn't seem to get the needle threaded again. 
You could see that they were both bothered. How 
we do reveal ourselves in the details! 

By and by the clock struck nine, and then ten, 
their usual hour for retiring. But they made no 
move toward retiring. She said, "Aren't you go- 
ing to bed?" And he said, "I think I'll not go yet 
a bit; you go." "No, I guesB I'll wait a while, 
too." And the clock struck eleven, and the hands 
worked around to twelve. Then they arose, and 
locked up, and went to bed, but — not to sleep. 
Each one pretended to be asleep, and each one 
knew the other was not asleep. By and by she 
said (women are always the keener) "Why don't 
you sleep?" And he said, gently, "How did you 
know I wasn't sleeping? Why don't you sleep?" 

"Well, I just can't for thinking of the boy up 
in the attic." 

"That's the bother with me," he replied. And 
the clock in the hall struck twelve, and one, and 
two. Still no sleep came. 

At last he said, "Mother, I can't stand this any 
longer; I'm going upstairs with Phil." And he 
took his pillow and went softly out of the room, 
and up the attic stairs, and pressed the latch-key 
softly, so as not to wake the boy if he were asleep, 
and tiptoed across the attic floor to the corner 
by the window, and looked — there Phil lay, wide 
awake, with something glistening in his eyes, and 
what looked like stains on his cheeks. And the 
father got in between the sheets with his boy, and 
they got their arms around each other's necks, 
for they had always been the best of friends, fath- 
er and son, and their tears got mixed up on each 
other's cheeks. Then they slept. And the next 
night when sleep time came the father said, 
"Goodnight, mother, I'm going upstairs with Phil." 
And the second night he slept in the attic with 
his boy. And the third night, again he said, 
"Mother, goodnight. I'm going to sleep with the 
boy again.' And the third night he slept in the 
place of punishment with his son. 

You are surprised to know that today that boy, 
a man grown, is telling the story of Jesus with 
tongue and life of flame in the heart of China. 

Do you know, I think that father is the best pic- 
ture of God I ever saw. God could no* take away 
sin. It's here. He could not take away suffering 
out of kindness to man. For suffering is sin's 
index finger, saying, "There's something wrong 
here." So he came down in the person of His 
Son, and lay down alongside of man for three 
days and three nights. That's God — our God. And 
beyond that he comes, and puts His life alongside 
of yours and mine, and makes us hate the bad, 
and long to be pure. To be on intimate terms 
with him, to live in the atmosphere of his pres- 
ence, to spend the day with him — that is the true 
normal life. — Exchange. 



NOT OUR OWN SAVIOR. 

The things pertaining to God are much more im- 
portant than the things pertaining to men, for 
they are the things which concern your soul, which 
is immortal. ... In the things pertaining to 
this life, a man can to a certain extent manage 
for himself if he likes. But the things pertaining 
to God, no man can handle properly himselef. You 
cannot be your own savior. You cannot forgive 
your own sins. You cannot blot out one single sin 
that is set down against you, and one unforgiven 
sin is enough to destroy your soul forever. — F. S. 
Webster. 



THE ACCESSIBILITY OF GOD. 

The swing-door of prayer stands always waiting 
for the touch of faith to press it back. If our 
Father's presence chamber were opened to us only 
once in a year, with how much greater reverence 
would we enter, how much more store would we 
set on it! We should anticipate the honor and 
privilege of that interview for the whole year, and 
eagerly avail ourselves of it. Alas, that familiar- 
ity with prayer does not alyaws increase our ap- 
preciation of its magnificence! — F. B. Meyer. 



Waste no strength dreading obstacles. Many a 
one disappears as we walk up to it. The Red Sea 
seemed a formidable obstacle to the Israelites, 
who knew the hosts of Pharaoh were behind them, 
but they crossed it on dry land. 



No retreat is commanded in God's army. The 
hosts of the Lord are always ordered to go for- 
ward. — Ex. 



February 4, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



Contributions. 

REV. SAMUEL LANDER, D. D. 

(Read by Rev. W. L. Sherrill, at the I Lander Anniversary, 

Greenwood, S. C,,Jan»30, 1909)- 

I was highly honnored when the pleasant task 
of preparing a paper bearing on the life and work 
of Dr. Samuel Lander was laid upon me, but I ap- 
proached the duty with a feeling of embarrass- 
ment for with such a wealth of material out of which 
to construct the sketch, I hardly knew what to 
choose, it being difficult to consider only a few of 
the traits of this good man in the brief time allot- 
ted to the subject. 

If time would allow me, we could enter Into an 
extended and exhaustive study of hia life to our 
interest and profit He was of Irish descent for 
his father, the late Rev. Samuel Lander, and his 
mother, Eliza Ann Lander, were born in Ireland 
in 1791 and 1793, respectively. They were married 
in the city of Cork in 1812, and on account of 
Catholic persecution, came to America in 1818, 
living for a time in Boston, then at easy stages 
they journeyed southward and finally settled per- 
manently in Lincolnton, N. C, and it was there on 
January 30, 1833, that Samuel Lander, the founder 
of Lander College, was born. 

It is an interesting fact that the South Carolina 
Conference was in session in that town on that 
eventful day. Bishop Andrew presided, and Dr. 
W. M. Wightman (afterward a Bishop), was the 
secretary of that conference. 

Samuel Lander, the first, was a man of remark- 
ably strong mind and rugged honesty. He was a 
lover of truth, a hater of sham, the very soul of 
honor, who followed where conscience led, and 
stood for what he thought was right at any cost. 
He was converted in middle life, joined the Meth- 
odist church, heard and heeded the call to the 
ministry, and was, for forty years, a very useful 
local preacher. His wife was a woman refined by 
nature, of deep piety, with a brilliant and well-fur- 
nished mind, and a memory so acute that she nev- 
er lost an incident or a date. Her knowledge of 
history was so accurate and her conversational 
gifts so attractive, that she could entertain her 
friends by the hour relating the romances and 
daring deeds of the English celebrities from the 
time of Alfred the Great even down to Victoria. 

The home life of these people was beautiful and 
their children were trained to fear God and to 
love the church. One of the most sacred recol- 
lections of my early childhood are the days I spent 
in that home. And I never shall forget when, at 
the morning and evening hour, the family gathered 
for worship, how the old people sat, one on each 
side, of the fireplace, with the other members of 
the household between and the slaves in the rear, 
and the patriarch read the lesson from the Holy 
Book and prayed. It was of such parentage that 
Dr. Lander, the founder of this college, came and 
it was in such a religious atmosphere that his ear- 
liest years were spent. 

He was an obedient child. His mother never 
had cause for trouble on account of his behavior. 
Like Samuel the prophet, or Timothy, he was good 
from his childhood. He never sowed wild oats. 
He sowed only the seeds of truth and soberness. 
Brought up in a religious atmosphere, trained in 
the way of righteousness, he had faith in God, but 
not until he was fifteen years old did he confess 
saving faith in Christ. This was in 1848, a little 
while before he entered college, when visiting one 
of his siters in Beaufort, N. C. During this visit 
a revival meeting was in progress there. He at- 
tended the services, became very serious, sought 
for salvation, was converted and joined the church. 
So obedient and good outwardly had he always 
hitherto been that his mother often remarked 
that the only change she could notice in Samuel 
was that after his conversion, he ceased to engage 
actively in boyish sports. 

He was a very small boy when first he went to 
school and after learning his letters and how to 
form them into words, it was his good fortune to 
be placed under the tuition of Mr. J. W. Murphy, 
who was a kinsman (by the way from Ireland), 
and an accomplished scholar and linguist. 

When but six years old he was studying Latin 
under Mr. Murphy, but he made rapid progress 
in the course, and the habits of thoroughness 
which pervaded all his lifework are due, next to 
native tendencies, to the accurate knowledge of 
root principles acquired under this teacher, for 
when he entered the Sophomore class at Randolph- 
Macon College at sixteen he was exceptionally 
well prepared and easily kept up with and led his 
classes, finally carrying off the honors on his grad- 
uating day. 



At one time during his college career, just be- 
fore examination day, a fellow student asked him 
if he was prepared in Geometry, and he replied: 
"I can demonstrate every proposition in the book 
except the 12th and the 8th." Then on being ad- 
vised that he had better prepare on that also, he 
at once went to work and before he retired that 
night understood it so clearly that the next day, 
when the professor submitted that very problem, he 
was able promptly to demonstrate it and when 
he did, he received from his teacher the highest 
praise. 

This conscientious student never passed over a 
lesson until he had mastered it. He knew thor- 
oughly and accurately what he studied, and this 
habit of thoroughness acquired in youth grew with 
his growth until it became a distinctive trait in 
his life. Thus consciously he was preparing for 
his lifework, for when he found the truth, he was 
capable of imparting it and illustrating in his own 
life the lesson of thoroughness. 

When a tiny boy t not long after he first entered 
school, he fell in love with the only sweetheart 
he ever had, and when he was hardly twenty-one 
years old, he married her, and no lovers in youth 
were ever more constant and true than these 
were through all the more than fifty years God 
spared them to each other. The little woman who 
was such an inspiration to him and help in all 
his undertakings, still abides with us, but she is 
too modest to claim any of the glory which came 
to him. He was fortunate in his parentage, in his 
religious advantages, in his educational opportun- 
ities and in his marriage. But he conserved all 
these in such a way as to prepare himself for the 
largest measure of usefulness. 

Fresh from college at nineteen, he was first a 
surveyor, law student, and then a teacher. First 
an instructor in Randolph-Macon College till he 
earned his Master's degree, then he taught in Ca- 
tawba College, at 'Newton, N. C. He later was 
Professor of Latin and Mathematics in Greensboro 
Female College, and Principal of High Point Semi- 
nary. In 1861 he surrendered to the call to preach 
and was admitted on trial into the South Carolina 
Conference in 1864. In 1865, he was principal of 
Lincolnton Seminary, and 1866 and 1867, was pas- 
tor of Lincolnton station. In 1868-1870 he was 
president of Davenport College. But when the 
'conference boundary was changed in 1870 and 
that territory was transferred to North Carolina 
he felt that the partonage of Davenport would be 
largely reduced so that he went to South Carolina 
and labored there during the remainder of his 
life. He was 41 years old, in the very prime of 
life when he went to Williamston. All the years 
had been preparing him for his work and now a 
ripe scholar, well furnished in head and heart, he 
was ready to do better work than ever before. 
From that time you well know his history and the 
wonderful service he rendered to the church 
through the college at Williamston. 

Among the strong points in the character of 
this good man I would say that he had faith, an 
unswerving faith in God and in Jesus Christ, His 
Son, and his whole life to the minutest detail was 
built on that truth. He knew in whom he believ- 
ed, and he considered it his only business in this 
world to fear God and keep his commandments. 
Life to him therefore was a serious fact, an eter- 
nal truth, and to be faithful and consequently use- 
ful he regarded as the service due from him to God 
and to his fellowman. The possession of such a 
faith quickened to the tensest degree an already 
sensitive conscience. He was painstaking in all 
he did and was never guilty of shoddy work, for 
be put his conscience into every task. If it was 
writingg a copy, or preparing a lesson, or teaching 
a class, or preaching a sermon, he, for conscience' 
sake, and love for righteousness, was careful of 
details; appreciating the great value of what we 
are pleased to call little things, he magnified duty, 
and did his best, and hear me, he who lives by 
this rule, is charged with righteousness even to 
the finger tips, for his common work becomes sanc- 
tified service and he worships God in all he does. 

He was a good man, guileless, unsuspicious — he 
had confidence in humankind and every man who 
knew him well loved him for his goodness'sake, 
and while he, like all men, was subject to huaian 
infirmity, yet I have never personally known a 
man whose life was so nearly ideal, so free from 
blemish, so full of commendable traits, so rich in 
good works. His motives were never questioned, 
and from his childhood even down to old age, I 
never heard of an act of his that deserved or call- 
ed forth adverse criticism. 
He came to his own when he came to the class 



room. He possessed all the requisites of a great 
teacher, viz: faith, humility, magnetism, strong 
common sense, accurate and wide scholarship, 
broad culture, and unusual capacity to impart 
knowledge. If he taught a lesson, absolute thor- 
oughness was his aim, and I shall never forget 
how, when a very small boy, in the reading class, 
he kept us during the whole recitation hour on 
one sentence until we had learned to observe cor- 
rectly the punctuation. 

Not only was he skilled as a mathematician, but 
he was also the master of seven languages. In 
1878, when the honorary, degree of Doctor of Di- 
vinity was conferred on him by Trinity College, 
he felt that he did not deserve the honor unless 
he was alble to read the whole Bible in the origi- 
nal. Already versed in the Greek, he at once 
took up the study of the Hebrew and made rapid 
progress in it, so that it was his rule in all the 
after years to only read portions of the Old and 
New Testament Scripture in the original Hebrew 
and Greek. A student from his youth, his inquir- 
ing mind never ceased to search in new fields and 
all fields where truth was hid, and in his maturer 
years his rare and ripe scholarship and varied 
learning was hard to duplicate. He not only had 
the capacity for details, but also for great under- 
takings. During the time of the Civil war when 
communication with the outside world was cut 
off and necessity became the mother of invention, 
books were scarce his thorough knowledge 
of mathematics enabled him to prepare Lander's 
Common School Arithmetic, which was the stan- 
dard in the earlier days of my school life, and 
which was used in his school up to recent years 
until the edition was exhausted. 

Dr. Lander was also a preacher of superior gifts 
— a teaching preacher. His pulpit ministrations 
were full of instruction to his hearers. He was a 
man of prayer and deep spiritual discernment, with 
a heart overflowing with love for sinners. In his 
earlier ministry, in 1867, when pastor in his na- 
tive town of Lincolnton, he conducted a revival 
meeting which lasted for six weeks and a great 
multitude was converted and fully 100 joined the 
church. It was the greatest meeting ever held in 
the history of that congregation. The people had 
faith in and loved him both as pastor and friend. 
His humble spirit was a source of power as it al- 
ways is with preachers and other men as well. 

An old gentleman, capable as a critic, once told 
me that many years ago in company with a friend 
returning from church after hearing for the first 
time a sermon by Dr. Lander, his companion re- 
marked that "when Mr. was here he 

stood before the pulpit and his whole demeanor 
suggested his self-importance, but Mr. Lander tries 
to hide behind the cross and seems to feel that he 
has nothing to do with the matter but to be a 
voice, a mouthpiece for his Master." That 
was his spirit, he never forced himself to the front, 
he never sought preferment. He was clothed in 
humility. He desired not to be ministered unto 
but to minister. 

All honors which came to him came unsought 
and were an appreciation of his work and charac- 
ter. Resting in the consciousness of duty faith- 
fully done, he cared nought for recognition. He 
knew that honest work was righteousness and 
that God would take knowledge ot it and he was 
too busy with his work to think of the applause of 
men. 

Through his long life as a teacher the impress 
of his personality was marked upon the thousands 
of young women who came under his tuition. His 
gentility, his pure life, his guileless nature, his 
sturdy adherence to principle, his thorough and 
honest performance of duty, all these together 
with his faith in God which was the foundation of 
all the rest, appealed to and affected the conduct 
of his pupils, and they carried back to their homes 
and through their lives those larger conceptions 
of duty and service which they learned from him. 

One of his old Davenport girls of the sixties re- 
cently wrote me as follows: "I was devoted to 
the sainted Dr. Lander, and shall ever feel that 
my whole life has been made better by having 
been his pupil for three years. He was my ideal 
of a perfect Christian gentleman, courteous and 
affable in his manner, chaste and faultless in his 
walk and conversation. During his stay in Lenoir 
there was a revival in the college and there was 
only one sermon ten minutes long. Nearly every 
girl in school professed conversion, and I heard 
Mr. Lander say that the numerous incidents con- 
nected with that revival did more to confirm his 
faith and hope than almost any other experience 
of his life." This tribute from one of his old stu- 



NORTH CAROLINA C I J Rl STjl AN* i A t) VOC A T E . 



February 4, 1909. 



From The Field. 



Rev. J. M. Terrell's Itinerary in the 
Charlotte District. 

Calvary (Charlotte), February 8, at 
7:30 p. m. 

Morven, February 9, at night. 

Lllesville, February 10, 11 a. m, 

Wedesboro, February 10, 7:30 p. m. 

Marshville, February 11, 11 a. m. 

North Monroe, February 11, at night. 

Waxhaw, February 12, 11 a. m. 

Unionville, February 12, at night. 

Matthews, February 13, at night. 

Brevard Street, February 14, 11 a. m. 

Tryon Street, February 14, 7:30 p. m. 

The Sunday school superintendents 
and lay leaders are urged to assist the 
pastors to secure a good attendance 
upon the services held by Brother Ter- 
rell. You will need, this year, the in- 
formation and inspiration which he 
will give you. 

H. K. BOYER. 



Canton Station. 

The first quarterly conference for 
Canton station was held by Presiding 
Elder Willis January 28, 1909. 

The report shows that all the con- 
ference collections had been paid in 
full, with some surplus to be reported 
on foreign and domestic missions. 
During the quarter there had been 
purchased $311.00 worth of furniture 
for the new parsonage. All salary ac- 
counts were up to the day, and a new 
system of lights placed in the church. 

A splendid League for the Seniors, 
with Rev. Howard E. Walter as presi- 
dent, has been instituted. A Junior 
League having a large membership, 
and a Woman's Home Mission Society 
have been started under splendid pros- 
pects. Every outlook for our church 
here is good. Pastors who know of 
Methodists that have come to Canton 
would do a good service by writing 
the Canton pastor, giving him infor- 
mation that would aid him in looking 
after these people. 

L. B. ABERNETHY. 



Hendersonville. 

We wish merely to say that Hender- 
sonville Methodism flourishes. The 
church is united, growing and zealous 
for the Master. Finances are kept up 
in full regularly, congregations fill the 
church, our Lord's disciples are in- 
creasing and He is adding to the 
church and edifying in the church, 
such as are being saved. 

The Sunday school demands more 
room, while the four missionary socie- 
ties are enlarging and doing real work 
for Christ. 

The Laymen's Movement is organiz- 
ed and plans are made to accomplish 
a full share of service. For a year the 
second Sunday in each month has been 
set apart as missionary day, and the 
spirit of missions is beginning to per- 
vade the entire congregation. This 
gracious spirit has recently expressed 
itself in providing for the full individ- 
ual support of the Rev. M. B. Stokes in 
Korea. This has been done with great 
joy and has already proved a genuine 
inspiration to the church. Cordially, 
JOHN W. MOORE. 



Wadesboro Station. 

We are glad to report to our readers 
of the Advocate how we are getting 
on in our church work in Wadesboro. 

Our station paid up all her demands 
for the past year and about $200 over 
on salary. We used the envelope sys- 
tem for each Sunday morning service, 
and it worked well. The stewards had 
not near so much to do. I advise every 
church to try the envelope system. 
It is so much easier to pay the amount 
and never miss it, and at the same 
time helps the preacher. Our preach 



er last year was Rev. J. II. West. We 
are glad to say he has been returned. 
He is a good preacher and a good pas- 
tor. We all love him very much. I 
don't think we could have done bet- 
ter if we had been allowed to pick the 
conference. He is a noble man.. The 
report he presented to the Conference 
last year exceeds any report in the 
history of our church. . Our preacher 
came here last year and found the par- 
sonage in a very bad condition. He 
saw the situation, went to work, sold 
the old one and today has one of the 
best in the Conference. The mem- 
bership since he came to us has in- 
creased from 346 to 421. Out of this' 
number 45 joined by certificate. The 
prospect for this year is good. P. 



From Ansonville. 

At our last Annual Conference I was 
appointed to the Ansonville charge, 
and while we regretted to leave Mor- 
ganton, where we had spent a pleasant 
year in obedience to the authorities 
of the Church, we came, and although 
the people hated to give up the former 
very popular pastor, Brother M. T. 
Steele, who had served them faithfully 
for two years, we have been kindly re- 
ceived and I am well pleased with the 
outlook. There is in this charge a fine, 
type of loyal Methodists, who seem to 
be willing .to enter heartily into ^ve.ry 
good work. 

Our first quarterly meeting was held 
soon after my arrival on the work. Re- 
ports were encouraging, and we, are 
hopeful for a successful year.' Brother 
Boyer, our new presiding elder, preach-, 
ed two good sermons at Ansonville and. 
made a fine impression on the people. 
Quite a number of our members are 
taking the Advocate, and most of them 
will doubtless renew, and we hope by 
the last of February to get the num- 
ber of new subscribers allotted to this 
charge. We are sure if the church pa- 
pers are taken and read, they will help 
us in our work of extending the Mas- 
ter's kingdom and in building up Chris- 
tian character. 

One of the great needs on our work, 
as we see it, is to get the revival fires 
kindled in every church in the charge. 
For this we urge our people earnestly 
to pray. Fraternally, 

P. L. TERRELL. 



Rock Spring Circuit. 

I have now made just two rounds in 
my nsw field of labor, the Rock Spring 
circuit, and I have found that it is a 
fine people whom I have been sent, to 
serve this year. They gave us a- very 
cordial welcome, and since our arrival 
have not ceased to show us kindness. 
I . most sincerely hope that my minis- 
try among them may be as helpful as 
it now seems to be appreciated. 

7 /erything seems hopeful. The work 
starts off in a very encouraging man- 
near. The first quarterly meeting has 
just been held and the visit of our lit- 
tle Irish presiding elder was greatly 
enjoyed. His preaching was of the 
sort that does good — both scholarly 
and spiritual. A building committee 
was appointed at this conference 
w'hose purpose is to build, this sum- 
mer, a nice brick, church at Bethel 
Considerable repair work on the inside 
of the parsonage will be done this win- 
ter. The benevilent collections were 
reported 85 per cent.- secured in cash 
and good subscriptions. The pastors 
salary was fixed at $900. 

Rehobeth church has suffered a sad 
loss in the death of two of its. young 
members. On January 5th Miss Lucy 
E. Abernathy, aged 13 years, died of 
penumonia, and on January 27th Mr. 
Charles E. Sherrill, aged 24 years, died 



pf acut.e. aypendicitis, which was fol- 
lowed by, blood poisoning. It is pecu- 
liarly, sad .the sudden taking away qf 
these yoiuig •people. May , the. . Lord 
giye grac.e„ to , the sorrowing relatives 
and frieuds. . *<•<•> 

I .expect tofUiake FebWary ; Advocate 
nionth, an.d',will do my 'besV to secure 
the number, pf.new fcWWserlberf,' allotted 
to this, chargp,. "• ' s V "* '• 

With all good 'wishes? to the Advo- 
cate family,, ,,, * "• * *«"<• ' i> I 
, . WILLIAM F. ELLIOTT. 



urge in behalf of the school that those 
who' are responsible for these scholar- 
i ships be as prompt as possible in send- 
. ing. thpm in. As pastor of the church 
here, and being, therefore, so intimate- 
ly corfneeted with the school, I feel 
that I "Will be excused for taking it 
upon myself to make the foregoing re- 
marks. Very truly yours, 

R. G. TUTTLE. 



Methodism in Transylvania. '-'"* ' ' 

"'' ;*£«•„ fit iMf '*-'r' *9+ i '; 

There arc-not a great many, Metho- 
dists in the beautiful county of Trail: 
sylvania;' our i'friepds, the Baptists, be- 
ing very numerous in thisj section and 
composing -a. 'large part of the popula- 
tion -except ''fir Brevard, where t the 
Methodists are equally strong,, if not 
in the majority. t f 

• We have four churches in the coun- 
ty outside «tf the town^ ap,d tyvo. pr 
three other regular preaching places. 
Brother J. 'F. Starnes . did excellent 
work on the Brevard circuit, last year, 
and the 'prospects 'are good Jor r growth 
in the country churches this, ..year. 
There 1 'are some points at which we 
ought to establish preaching^ .places, 
which would give us a. brQader3a.se pf 
operation in the county 
. Methodism ^"'in Brevard is. growing 
slowly, but surely. We have.^op,d eon,-, 
gregations,' a good. Sunday ^school, a 
splendid Woman's Home Mission So.- 
ciety, an' active"- Lig|it Bearers' , Society 
and a very -good Ep worth League,, jve 
are just organizing ,a, . "Men's Brother- 
hood, which' we hope will , he, a great, 
blessing to the ; men of, the. church., I 
feel sure that the men of .. the church 
are becoming 'more ,mt erested.. in. the 
Kingdom -of God • and are. Jjecoming 
more efficient Servants .'of 'the^ .church 
in 'her great work. '" '' "* .... ' .< 

Blit One of - the greatest ' things, of 
-Methodism and for' Methodism in this 
county and section, is iMe Brevar^ In- 
stitute, 'and ' I ""wish to ..sDeaj": of, the 
work of this- noble scnoo]. n '^%e Home, 
Mission 'Society .conferred, a,, great 
blessing ■■■ on Western North, ^Carolina 
■Methodism - by' 'Sending Mr. and .Mrs. 
C. H. Trowbridge into our midst. Pro- 

'«&»-"? •-•'..* fit *•"' ■•'••:* 

fessor : Trowbrodge," with his strong 
Christian character ' and fine' prepara-. 
•tien for work, is a' pillar of strength, 
not only ' in" the school,, but jn .. the 
church.' and:, community.' He' has gath- 
ered about him an unusually, strong 
faculty, an-d Lifeel safe^ni saying that 
the ' institute shas never done better 
work than, is -being d6ne ...at present. 
The spiritnal"life of the school, which 
is -always' healthy, 'has just recejyeii". 
added' impetus • through' "severa], ser- 
vices conducted in Tne chapel by the" 
Rev. J. W. f Moore, '"pT Hen^e^sdnyille,. 
Quite .a number o'f "pupils professed 
faith" in Christ as the re'sjfl't of these 
cervices. And immedfMely on the i close 
of these 'Services every heart 'in the 
school - was made giatd' by the ..arrival 
of Miss Bennett"' and Miss Head," who. 
are. to spend two or "three days at. the 
institute. ! • ' ' 

Now while speaking of the institute, 
- , -.. T -i. ■-»- ******* 9< 

let me 'call attefltio'tftO the collection 

-for Brevard Institute on the first Sun- 
day in; March; -We tr'ust that every, 
pastor- will secure a feood offering on 
that flay. A1;<1 there.fe" another. 'mat : 
ter that I wish* "to hjerJtion. that 5 Pro- 
fessor Trowbridge's inbjlesty will ..not 
allow him to press. Tfjere t are quite 
•a number of young woih^n" anil' girls in. 
the institute on .-scholarships "pledged 
by districts,- -societies*," e'tfcV." T find that 
this money- usaallyf -cdin"|§ _ in slowly 
for' lack, I -suppose, ' of s sonde "One to 
press the -collection.' Now.'.jaV' we' 
know, this school-- Is run 5 at" the "lowest 
passible cost- so that 'there Js no mar- 
gin, to cover these: scholaVships f' that "do 
not come up ^;:time,''there-fore , lef me" 



Trinity College Notes. 

The Athletic Council has secured 
the services of Dr. Merle T. Adkjns, of 
Baltimore, as coach for the baseball 
team for the coming season. Dr. Ad- 
kiiis is a graduate of Beloit College, 
and of the medical department of 
Johns Hopkins University. He gave 
1 the greatest satisfaction last year as 
coach. He is not only one of the most 
proficient coaches, but he is a man 
whose influence in any college com- 
munity is beneficial. He is exceeding- 
ly popular with the student body. The 
record made by the baseball team last 
year gave Dr. Adkins such a reputa- 
tion as a successful coach that efforts 
have been made by several institu- 
tions to secure his services this year. 
He expects to begin his work the first 
*of February: 

: - It has. been the custom at Trinity 
for a number of years to hold a se- 
ries of religious services under the 
"auspices of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association. These services are 
•held just after the mid-year examina- 
tions. The association has requested 
President Kilgo to conduct them this 
year. The first service will be held 
Sunday, and will be continued each 
'••evening during the week. 
I The lectures by Bishop E. E. Hoss, 
of Nashville, Tenn., under the auspices 
. of the Avera Department of Biblical 
Literature, will be held the 4th, 5th 
jand Gth of April. The lectures will be 
I given- in- the Craven Memorial Hall, 
and the public is invited to hear this 
distinguished speaker. 
■ -The publication committee of the 
* faculty, is now at work on the cata- 
logue for. the year 1908-'9. The cata- 
logue will b& ready for distribution 
j earlier than hitherto. 
- - President Kilgo spoke to the colored 
Agricultural and Mechanical College, 
in Greensboro, last Friday evening. 
On Saturday evening, in the Angier 
..Du.kec-gyninasium, was played the first 
of a series of basket ball games with 
Wake Forest College. 

The mid-year- examinations closed 
■on: -Saturday, and the second term will 
-.begin Monday; February 1. 



' fceath of Aaron Tucker. 

In the' death Of Aaron Tucker Surry 
couniy loses one of its best citizens. 
' Mr. Tucker died on Tuesday of last 

■^eek at his home near Zephyr of erye- 
sipela's and heart trouble. The re- 

; m'airis were interred in the cemetery 
of the Methodist church, of which he 

-Tvas a faithful member, on Friday, Jan- 

a uary 22d. ' 

Mr. Tucker was 70 years old on the 

"4th day of this month. He was a suc- 
cessful farmer and had a good farm 
and a^itice home. Mr. Tucker has long 

"bee'S "a member of the Methodist 
Church, and a steward in that church. 
We are informed that he first united 
hh.'.M-jf with the Methodist church 
hor'e in Elkin, having been a member 
hero 'when the congregation worship- 
pe'd in the old church on the hill near 

'Mr.' John Madison's. 
"'The county, community and the 

oh'Urch £11 sustain a heavy loss in the 
death' Of Mr. Tucker. — Elkin Times. 



-"'"If "we" spent as much time trying 
to overcome our faults as we do to 
bide them, they would have been 
'tftre'd long ago." '• 



February 4, 1909. 



MORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



7. 



Logan B. Abernethy Dead. 

In the death of Logan B. Abernethy, 
which occurred January 24th at Ruth- 
erford College, the county loses one of 
its best citizens and old-time Southern 
gentlemen. 

He was a brother of the late Robert 
L. Abernethy, founder of Rutherford 
College, in whose early efforts for the 
promotion of education for the masses, 
"Uncle Logan," as he was known to 
thousands of students, shared in great 
measure. He was the twin brother of 
Moses S. Abernethy, of Hickory, who 
survives him. They were born August 
17, 1824, and were, up to the time of 
Logan B. Abernethy's death, perhaps 
the oldest living twins in the United 
States. 

"Uncle Logan's" was a life that ty- 
pically exemplified the Christian life. 
Like Christ, he was a carpenter; like 
Christ he carried with him to his daily 
duties the image of his God and Fath- 
er, and he lived each day as if it were 
to be his last. 

Eulogies at best are fulsome things, 
often set down as empty trinklets to 
men of great estate. We shall build 
no towering monument to Uncle Lo- 
gan, no marble shaft may kiss the sky 
above his slumbering ashes, but in the 
lives and memories of his neighbors, 
in the reverence of his devoted family, 
whose hands never lacked succor for 
surcease to his dying pains, in the rec- 
ognition of an honorable citizen, a 
loyal Christian, a patriotic soldier, a 
gentle father, a provident and faith- 
ful husband, Logan B. Abernethy has 
closed a life that might well be the 
envy of mitred priest or coroneted 
king. A FRIEND. 



Stephen Bundy. 

In the year of 1849, the 26th day 
of February, Stephen Bundy was born 
on a farm lying along the banks of 
Deep River. Here he grew to man- 
hood with his brothers, Shubal, Har- 
mon and Henry, and with one sister, 
Mrs. Marian Lamb. At the age of 
21, June 28, 1870, he was wedded in 
the holy bonds of matrimony to Miss 
Eliza Caudle, with whom he lived 
nearly forty years a very happy life. 
He fell heir to a portion of his fath- 
er's farm bordering the northern lim- 
its of the thrifty little village of James- 
town. On this he built, in the pro- 
cess of time, a very comfortable res- 
idence, into which seven bright, in- 
telligent children were born and rear- 
ed. Bascom, the oldest son, married 
a Miss Johnson and lives in High 
Point. Oscar and Robert married vil- 
lage girls with whom they had play- 
ed on the lawn and village school 
yard from childhood. They hold re- 
sponsible positions of bookkeeper and 
shipping clerk respectively in the 
Oakdale mills, while residing in beau- 
tiful cottage homes in Jamestown. 
Carle is a prosperous merchant of the 
same place. Eva married Zolie March, 
leaving Dora at home to care for and 
comfort a widowed mother's heart, of 
which home Carle now naturally be- 
comes the provider and protector. 

Mr. Bundy was a faithful and ef- 
ficient overseer in the Oakdale mills 
for thirty-seven years. His home was 
situated one and three-fourth miles 
away; this he walked twice, and often 
four times each day, for these many 
years. If the same steps had been 
taken in a trip around the world, he 
would have gone around twice. The 
time keeper's records show that in 
all these years he was absent from 
his daily work only a few times. 

The day of his funeral, which took 
place from his home Tuesday, Jan- 
uary 12, 1909 (he having departed 
this life the previous Sabbath at 6:40 
p. m.), the Oakdale mills were closed 
down in honor of this faithful man. 
It was a beautiful sight, and withal 



pathetic scene to witness the men and 
women, the boys and girls, that had 
known him all their lives, march in, 
one by one, to view the remains of 
their friend and co-laborer. The heav- 
ing breast and tear-stained cheeks 
showed forth clearly how they loved 
and respected the man who had ten- 
derly and yet firmly guided the daily 
toils of many of their hands from child- 
hood; for the operatives of this mill 
have never been of the roving kind 
peculiar to many mill people. The 
management is so generous and fair 
that there is now and then but little 
restlessness which creates" a disposi- 
tion to move. It reminds us more of 
one family working harmoniously in 
one common interest. The silent in- 
fluence of such a life as Mr. Bundy's 
inspired by the sainted founder, with 
his unsullied character of supreme hu- 
man kindness, now being perpetua- 
ted and exemplified by his successor 
and honored son, help create such 
pleasing conditions and amiable sen- 
timents between proprietor and oper- 
ative, capital and labor. Here you find 
a solution of that perplexing problem 
fully demonstrated how to settle the 
estranged relations that exist between 
money ind labor. Let the golden rule 
prevail and the problem is solved. 

Mr. Bundy was a very quiet, un- 
assuming man. He assidiously avoid- 
ed ostentations to the extent of mark- 
ed timidity. He obstinately refused to 
be influenced by shams or hypocrit- 
ical appearances. To be rather than 
seem to be was the motto of his life. 
He never spoke ill of any one. If 
nothing good could be said, he was 
dumb — a noble habit as well as a love- 
ly virtue that! He strictly attended to 
his own business, and when that task 
was accomplished he retired to leave 
others to do likewise. A good man, a 
useful citizen, a kind father, and a de- 
voted husband has gone from us. Shall 
we ever see his like again? Peace be 
to his ashes. His funeral was conduct- 
ed from his home by the writer, in the 
presence of the largest gathering of 
citizens, friends and neighbors we 
have seen in many a day. The inter- 
ment took place at Deep River, there 
to sleep the silent sleep of death till 
the unfolding glories of the resurrec- 
tion morn. J. A. BOWLES. 



MOTHER'S DAY. 

Miss Anna Jarvis, who lives in the 
city of brotherly love, has suggested 
a "holiday the whole world can enjoy 
as one nation" — the second Sunday in 
May is Mother's Day. Mother is rec- 
ognized as one of the sweetest words 



in the English language. • 

There is inspiration, pathos and 
poetry in Miss Jarvis' suggestion. It 
breathes the spirit of our holy reli- 
gion. 

The thought appeals to my imagina- 
tion and heart. It involves a princi- 
ple that appeals to the great heart of 
universal humanity — to people of 
every tribe and tongue on this bab- 
bling earth. Imagine all the men, 
women and children on all the earth 
paying a loving tribute to motherhood. 
Would not such a scene interest celes- 
tial intelligences and send a thrill of 
sympathetic joy through the ranks o\ 
angels and saints in the Eternal City? 

It was the son of Mary who honored, 
exalted and glorified womanhood and 
motherhood when here on earth. In 
the very climax of his agony on the 
cross he committed his mother to the 
care of the evangelist John, his be- 
loved disciple. I close with an ex- 
cerpt from an editorial in a recent is- 
sue of The Woman's National Daily: 

"The first Mothers' Day was observ- 
ed last year. It is to be observed 
again this year and through all of the 
succeeding years throughout the centu- 
ries. Thousands wore the little white 
flowers that made 'heart speak to 
heart' over the civilized world, on the 
second Sunday of May, 1908.' Millions 
will wear it on the second Sunday 
of next May, for there is back of this 
observance a principle so deep that it 
strikes to the very foundations of the 
human heart. There is none so cruel, 
none so debased in nature, none so 
forgetful of the old home ties, that 
they do not now and then recall ten- 
der memories of the childhood days 
when a toddling, helpless creature 
called a whole wide world by the name 
of mother. It matters not how far one 
may have wandered from home, it 
matters not whether the mother re- 
mains in the flesh to bless and encour- 
age and advise, Mothers' Day has spe- 
cial significance for every man and 
woman and child who has been horn 
into this world of trial and trouble. It 
is a day for each — a day for all. 

"For generations we have been hon- 
oring men. In the language of Miss 
Jarvis: 'We strew the graves of our 
brave soldiers with flowers, and flow- 
ers are scattered on the waters in lov- 
ing memory of our naval heroes. 
Every class and race of "our country- 
men have been honored and rewarded 
for valor, but no class of our country- 
women has been recognized as heroes 
and patriots by a grateful nation. Yet 
who will dispute that as pioneers, as 
patriots in war and peace, as 'best 



citizens at air="€Tmes,' nobfe mothers 
have not endured hardships as faith- 
fully and heroically as any soldier 
of the battlefield?' We can not have 
national cemeteries for these heroic 
women, we may not even give them 
the respect and love in their lifetimes 
that is their just due, but on this one 
day of each year we may pin a little 
white ower on our breasts and thus 
silently testify to the loving memo- 
ries that linger in sons' and daughters' 
hearts. 

"Fortunate, indeed, will be those 
who on the second Sunday of next 
May still have mothers whom they 
may greet in the flesh. For them, the 
privileges of the day may be doubled 
by brightening the lives of the living 
mothers with sympathetic letters or 
with words of kindly cheer and appre- 
ciation. For the others, those whose 
mothers have been called to the Great 
Beyond, there may be a visit to the 
little mound in the old cemetery, the 
scattering of the sacred grave with 
sweet flowers, and the wearing of the 
flloral badge that signifies the heart 
o'erflowing with filial love and ever- 
lasting gratitude. Let the second Sun- 
day of May be for you 'arid for all man- 
kind, insofar as it lies within your 
power to make it such, a day of unsel- 
fishness. For through a mother's un- 
selfishness you are here." 

T. F.' GLENN. 



TheSto!z Electrophone— A New, Scientific and 
Practical fnverttion for Those Who Are 
Deaf or Partial! y Deaf— May Now 
be Tested in Your Own home. 

Deaf or partial] y deaf people niay now make a month's 
trial of the stolz Electrophone at home. This is in 
usually important nev/s for the deaf , ror by thisplan 
tliifinal sel cti m of tlio one completely satisfactory 
hearing aid is made easy 2nd inexpensive lor everyone 
Tli s new Invention (U.S. 
S?l Pa en fc No. 103,676) renders 
/ uniuri'Fsary suell clumpy 



unsi'erlity and frequently 
- harmful devices as trum- 
f-'K-BBfr'Pet;!, ilcrn3, tubes, ear 
~ I drums, fans, etc. It is a 
tiny electric telephone 
that fits on the car, and 
Tfhlch. the instant it is ap- 
plied, magnifies tho sound 
vravea in such manner as to 
carse an astonishing increase 
ill the cl -arness of all sounds. 
It overcomes the buzzing: and 
roaring" car noises, and also so 
constantly and electri- 
r|^~3 cally. exercises the vital 
_-rJ J parts of the ear that, 
s. O. LidSctoV' 238 13th Lsuslly. the natural, un- 
I'iecSpSSne 1 Leslcflti- .Mod hearing itself is 
e a o u 5 1 1 r.\a_ S}'_^}'_^^',^J gradually restored. 




Prominent, Business Man's Opinion, 

STOLZ K F EOT B O P H Oil H < O.. Clue- - o .— I am pleased 
-o say tlint t 
Heine* smft.ll in sizi 



nakesitrnF.FFRA 
L have tried ali-ol 
onshavi iff defe< 
ale Grocer, Mich 
Write cr call n 

<W pf ESO'tal ho-. 

indorsees who 



F, TO Als'Y 1 1 



an < 

AVKTZiiED, and I believe 



i rccon mend it to al 1 prr- 
igr.— M. W. HOY T, Whole' 
• d EivcrSt., Chicap 
go oiTiee for particulars of 
i &- d list of prominent. 
Huiries. Physicians 



cordially invited 6? investigate. Address or call 

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I pifctsbursr, Scftttio. J>*'s 
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. Toronto. 



Egg Production 



- 





Childress* S. C, WMS2" ?«;f:orns 
World's BesSEgg r^cc-acers 



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generally in a condition ; to yield you a profit. 

Note what Jno. F. Childress, the White Leghorn Specialist of 
Sweetwater, Tenn., writes: "I feel it my duty to state to you the 

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V 4 




s. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 4, 1909. 



The Christian Life. 



It was Goethe who said, "Life is a 
quarry." He does not mean the life 
outside of yourself. He means your 
own life, that separate part of God's 
universe over which he has set you 
as supreme master, king to rule the 
dominion. Goethe says that this life, 
your own life his life, everybody's 
life, is a quarry. A quarry is a place 
where stone Is gotten. The value of 
a quarry is always in the quality of 
its stone. The Rutland marble quar- 
ries ar famed all over our own coun- 
try. Now, life If it be a quarry, is 
simply a place containing a some- 
thing that is valued, unformed, but 
with skill may be wrought into what 
is valuable. The stone from the quar- 
ry Is chiselled into form. A greater 
value comes from the chiselling of 
this stone. Michael Angelo's "Mo- 
ses" is witness of what a great artist 
may do with a chisel upon a block 
of marble. Really, then, if your own 
life is a quarry, you yourself must be 
the artist, and out of the material of 
the quarry you are going to make 
what Is beautiful and worthful to the 
world. Let me complete the entire 
quotation: "Life is a quarry out of 
which we are to mould and chisel 
and complete a character." — John T. 
McFarland, D. D. 



HER ONE REGRET. 

Some years ago there passed away 
one of those lovely souls whom we 
call "saints on earth." Her whole 
life had been one inspiration and 
help to all around her, and her end 
was not less triumphant. One by one 
her friends were summoned to her 
bedside to receive her farewell bless- 
ing, and each felt, as she left her, that 
she had been on hallowed ground. 
One day her neice, who careri for her, 
said, "O aunt, what a wonderful 
thing it is that you can look back 
over your long life and find that there 
is absolutely nothing you have ever 
done that could cause you regret!" 
The feeble old lady smiled a little 
sadly, and said: 

"But there are things I regret." 

"You, aunt!" cried her niece, in- 
credulous. "What could you find to 
regret?" 

"I regret," she replied, "the good 
times I might have had and did not." 

There is a deep lesson in this. The 
conscientious housewife is apt to be 
a Martha, "cumbered with much serv- 
ing," and in her absorption in her 
daily routine she lets the opportuni- 
ties for change and recreation slip by 
her. This is wrong to her household 
as well as to herself. She owes her 
family the cheering atmosphere that 
can only come from a happy, well-bal- 
anced nature. To keep at her best 
the home-maker must have an out- 
side stimulus. So begin this domes- 
tic year with the resolution that you 
will not let imaginary obstacles stand 
in the way of your enjoyment. — Har- 
per's Bazar. 



THE NEW NAMES. 

When Bishop Brent was visiting in 
Japan, he was asked to officiate at a 
baptism of Japanese converts. There 
were three people who desired to be 
baptized. The first to come forward 
was an old man. 

"What is your name?" asked the 
bishop. 

And the old man answered "Sim- 
eon;" and then he smiled, and add- 
ed, "For mine eyes have seen thy 
salvation." 

The second man was young and 
strong. 

"Thy name?" said the bishop. 



"Cornelius," the young man an- 
swered. 

And the bishop looking on him in 
his youth and enthusiasm, understood 
why he had chosen the name of the 
centurian, that "just man," whom Pet- 
er baptized in Caesarea so long ago 
— "Of a truth, God is no respecter of 
persons; but in every nation he that 
feareth him, and worketh righteous- 
ness, is accepted with him." 

The third to come to the front was 
a child, a little lad ten years old, 
clinging to his father's hand. 

"The name of the child?" asked 
the bishop. 

And the father answered: "His 
name is Isaac. I give him to the 
Lord." 

And the bishop marveled at the 
wisdom and simplicity and reverent 
understanding of this people.-Youth's 
Companion. 



THE HOPEFUL VIEW. 

There is a great difference in the 
way different people endure their sor- 
row. Some look only down — down in 
to the grave, down into their own 
breaking hearts, down at the empti- 
ness, the ruin, and the darkness about 
them. These find no comfort. Oth- 
ers, with grief no less keen, with 
loss no less sore, look up into the 
face of God and see love there; look 
into heaven where their loved ones 
are; look at the blessed stars of hope 
which shine above them, and are com- 
forted. Whittier, in "Snow-Bound," 
sets the two aspects of sorrow side 
by side: 

"Alas for the man who never sees 
The stars shine through the cypress 
trees! 

Who, hopeless, lays his dead away, 
Nor looks to see the breaking day 
Across the mournful marbles play! 

"Who hath not learned, in hour of 
faith, 

The truth to flesh and sense unknown, 
That life is ever Lord of death, 
And Love can never lose its own." 

—J. R. Miller, D. D. 



PICTURES ON THE WALL. 

The explanation of the fact that a 
boy reared away inland, longed for 
the sea and became a seafaring man, 
was found in a picture on the wall 
of his home; the picture of a majestic 
ship sailing on the sea. Daily it 
caught his eye and filled his mind 
till it determined his life. What kind 
of pictures are on your walls? I see 
them in elegant Christian homes, in 
offices of Christian business and pro- 
fessional men — pictures that make it 
harder to live pure lives. Here no 
doubt is found the explanation of 
many a moral lapse that surprised 
and shocked the neighbors and broke 
the hearts of the home folks. Pic- 
tures beget thoughts, thoughts color 
the heart, and out of the heart are 
the issues of life (Mark 7, 21). "Lead 
us not into temptation." Maybe you 
could help the Lord answer that 
prayer by taking down some pictures 
from your walls. Suppose Jesus 
came to your home as He did to that 
home in Bethany, would you have the 
pictures just as they are on the walls 
of the sitting room and His bedroom? 
If not, why not? If you would be 
ashamed for Him to see them, are 
they safe for the dear ones of your 
own home, yourself included? — Cen- 
tral Presbyterian. 



FAR-SIGHTED. 

The Christian above all others, 
should be a far-sighted man. His view 
is not bounded by the limits of the 
current week or year. It is not bound- 
ed by the grave. He may be rich or 
poor, as God determines; but he is 
always rich toward God. In trouble 
he has a stay. In calamity he has 
goods which cannot be taken away 
from him. He will do his work in the 
world with care and dliigence; but 
always with the courage which is 
born of faith and nourished by love. 
And out of this faithful and courage- 
ous life the flower of joy will spring. 
The things that really matter cannot 
make against his peace. As for the 
rest, has he not committed his whole 
life to the all-powerful, the peace-giv- 
ing Father? And in that confidence 
he comes to rest of heart. — Exchange. 



OUR BEST INHERITANCE. 

Christ has committed to our hands 
the Gospel. It is the best inheritance 
which Heaven can give. We our- 
selves are heirs along with our broth- 
ers and sisters in heathen lands. In 
becoming Christians, we ourselves 
have received our share of the setate. 
Shall we withhold from our fellow- 
heirs, who grope in the outside dark- 
ness, that which belongs to them? We 
are indebted to the lost nations in 
the full amount of the gospel inheri- 
tance. Unless we send them the gos- 
pel, we fail to give them the square 
deal, as well as fail in loyalty to our 
Lord and Master. — Rev. S. L. Porte, 
D. D. 



"If a strenuous soul be sad, so 
much the worse for him and his 
cause. He is trying to shoulder more 
of the universe than one man can 
carry. Let us trust God, and right 
in the strain we may find our mouth 
filling with his gifts of laughter. Lone- 
liness, moroseness, discontent, impa- 
tience, anxiety — leave them for the 
unreligious." 



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Watches, Sterling Silver 
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Loading Jewelers. 




MEDICINE' 1 



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tell th» r neighbors? Because 
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CHAS. W. MOSELEY,.M.D. 

Practice Limited to 

Diseases of Stomach and Intestines 

Opposite Guilford Hotel 
OVER FARISS-KLUTZ DRUG CO., 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Office Phone 571 * Residence 1345 
Office : 221 S. ELM STREET. 

Hours 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 
2 p. m. to 5 p. m. 



How beautifully the coming down of 
the rain typifies the descent of God's 
saving grace. "He shall come down 
like rain upon the mown grass, said 
the Psalmist. Quietly, steadily, the 
rain falls, giving vigor and greenness 
to the stubble, a new face to the 
field. So all things change when the 
Spirit comes into the life. The old 
life passes away and a glorious new 
life takes its place, which grows more 
and more until the harvest. — Selected. 




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(Next to tne Post Office. 



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The difference between 
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A strong constitution 
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Made by The Johnson's 
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25 and 50 cent bottles. Trial, 10 cent 
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February 4, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



9. 



Our Little Folks. 



TALKING IN THEIR SLEEP. 

By Edith M. Thomas. 

"You think I am dead," 
The apple tree said, 
"Because I have never a leaf to 
show; 
Because I stoop, 
And my branches droop, 
And the dull gray mosses over me 
grow; 

But I am alive in trunk and shoot. 

The buds of next May 

I fold away — 
But I pity the withered grass at my 
root." 

"You think I am dead," 
The quick grass said, 
"Because I have parted with stem 
and blade. 
But under the ground 
With the snow's thick blanket over 
me laid, 
I'm all alive and ready to shoot 
Should the spring of the year 
Come dancing here — 
But I pity the flower without branch 
or root." 

"You think I am dead," 
A soft voice said, 
"Because not a branch or a root I 
own. 

I never have died, 
But close I hide 
In the plumy seed that the wind has 
sown. 

Patient I wait through the long win- 
ter hours. 
You will see me again — 
I shall laugh at you then, 
Out of the eyes of a hundred flow- 
ers." 

— Standard. 



THE NEW NAME. 

Aunt Julia was rocking back and 
forth in the little parlor. Sunday was 
the only day that she would take time 
for rocking. Week days she was al- 
ways busy. 

It was half-past four, and Charity 
came in from Sunday school. Aunt 
Julia had given the child a home ev- 
er since the death of her parents. 
Charity had plenty to eat, and re- 
spectable clothes to wear, but there 
were other things for which she long- 
ed. 

The child often sobbed herself to 
sleep because she missed the "good- 
night talk" that made going to bed a 
pleasure when mother was living. 
"Oh, if Aunt Julia only would be like 
mother!" she often sighed. 

As she came into the little parlor, 
she exclaimed: "Aunt Julia, my Sun- 
day school teacher gave me a pres- 
ent. See it's a New Testament, but 
it's not exactly like the other one, 
it's re — vised. That is, some of the 
words are changed to make the mean- 
ing plainer." 

"How did she happen to give it to 
you?" asked Aunt Julia. 

"Well, I'll tell you. You know how 
I have always disliked my name. It 
sounds so old-fashioned and hard, 
somehow. Mother used to call me 
Cherry and Chatty, and Charity 
seems so — so horrid! One time I saw 
a sign in a drug store, 'Soda water 
as Tpld as charity,' and I always think 
of it when you call me Charity, Aunt 
Julia." 

"You need not expect me to say 
Cherry or Chatty, for your name is 
Charity," said Aunt Julia. 

"Oh, yes, I know," and the child 
gave a little sigh. "But let me tell 
you, auntie, I was talking to Miss 
Raven about my name, and she asked 
me to come past her home, and she 



took me in, and gave me this book, 
and marked a chapter for me to read. 
She says that she is sure I shall 
change my opinion about my name 
when I read this chapter, so now I'm 
going up to my room to read it." 

A few minutes later the child was 
comparing the words in the Revised 
Version with those in her old little 
New Testament, . opened at the thir- 
teenth chapter of I Corinthians. With 
wonder and pleasure she read the 
words: "Love suffereth long, and is 
kind; love envieth not; love. . . doth 
not behave itself unseemly, seeketh 
not its own, . . . beareth all things, 
believeth all things, hopeth all things, 
endureth all things. Love never fail- 
eth. . . . Now abideth faith, hope, 
love, these three; and the greatest 
of these is love." 

"Oh!" she exclaimed alound, "to 
think that my dreadful name has such 
a beautiful meaning! I shall never 
again feel that I dislike it. I shall 
always feel when people are saying 
'Charity' that they mean 'Love.' And 
when aunt Julia says she took me 
for the sake of charity, I shall know 
that she really took me for love's 
sake. Oh, I'm so glad!" 

When the child returned to the lit- 
tle parlor, she exclaimed, "Aunt Ju- 
lia, I've found out that my name 
means 'Love.' So now every time 
you call me, I shall know that you 
mean 'Love.' Isn't that beautiful? It 
makes me so happy! And now I am 
going to live so that you can't help 
thinking that I'm like my name. God 
is going to help me, for I've asked 
Him. I feel that I love everyone 
now." 

Charity looked closely at her aunt, 
and saw a tear slowly rolling down 
each cheek. 

"Aunt Julia," she said, her voice 
trembling a little, "I love you! And 
now let me show it sometimes, be- 
cause I am so mother-sick! Will you 
let me give you a hug?" 

And the child threw her arms 
around the old lady's neck. To her 
surprise, Aunt Julia said, "The Lord 
bless you, my dear! Little Charity, 
you are a little Love!" — Helen Som- 
erville, in The Sunday School Times. 



DOTTIE AND THE PRINCESS. 

"Dottie, will you go to the store 
for me?" 

"Yes, mamma, just as soon as I 
finish this story. It is all about a 
princess who had a great deal of 
money and a kind heart, and went 
around doing good and helping ev- 
ery one she saw in trouble." 

"Dottie," said mamma again pres- 
ently, "you didn't bring me those 
chips, and it is almost time to start 
dinner." 

"I will, mamma, by and by; but 
how I should love to be a princess 
like this one, and be able to help 
make every one around me happy?" 

Mamma finished peeling her pan of 
potatoes and brought the basket of 
chips herself, while Dottie scarcely 
looked up from her book. 

"O Dotty, p'ease tie 'is 'tring on 
my wagon. The old one's bwokened." 
This was baby Bertie. 

Dottie threw down her book impa- 
tiently. "You are a little nuisance!" 
she exclaimed, as she grabbed the 
string from her brother so hastily 
that she broke it. "I wish you'd go 
'way and let me alone. I never can 
have a good time all by myself." 

Mamma was coming out of the pan- 
try with a jar of preserved peaches 
just in time to hear her little daugh- 
ter's last words. But there was only 



a little wonder in her voice as she 
inquired: "Did the princess in your 
story book try to have a good time 
all by herself?" 

"N — no, mamma; I guess not," 
said Dottie very slowly. 

"Well," continued mamma, "if you 
really want to be like her, you can't 
begin a minute too soon." 

Dottie stooped to pick up her book 
and forgot to answer. But as she 
went out of the room there was such 
a queer expression on her face that 



I am almost sure she heard. — Our 
kittle Ones. 



FROST PROOF 



CABBAGE 
PLANTS. 

GUARANTEED TO SATISFY PURCHASERS 



Price: 1,000 to 5.000 at $1.50 per 1,000; 
6,000 to 9,000 at $1.25 per 1,000; 10,000 
and over at $1.00 per- 1.000. Our cata- 
logue givHS full Instructions for grow- 
ing all kinds of fruits and Vfgcta l>lis. 
and mailt-d on request. Wm. C. GER- 
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Box, 670, Young's Island. S. C. 



SECURITY. 



The large capital and conservative management of this bank afford 
absolute security for all money entrusted to its care 

4*7° laterest on Savings Deposits. 

We cordially invite your pxtro"age. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE BANK. 

CAPITAL, $300,000.00. 

E. P. Wharton, President. « » v»rr«Ri« i>»o,i»> 

J. W. Hoott. Vice President F. H. Nicholson. Assistant ( ashler 

J. w. Cask, Mmaeer wsvnp Denartoient. 




Edison Phonographs are sold 
everywhere at the same prices 

$12 50 to $60 



Edison Ambercl Records 50c 
Regular Edison Records 35c 
Edison Grand Opera Records, 7Zc 

It is Mr. Edison's desire thnt a Fhonn. 
eraph should not only be cheap enough 
for everyone to own one, but also 
that everyone should enjoy the 
same advantage in purchasing it 



Nothing else that you can buy will 
provide so much of the best kind of 
amusement for yourself and your family at such a trifling cost as 

<mfe EDISON 
PHONOGMP 

It differs from all other sound-reproducing instruments because it 
was invented and perfected by Thomas A. Edison, and because it 
is constructed on a principle which is more nearly perfect than 
that used in any other instrument made for a like purpose. 




The first Phonograph ever made was 
made by Mr. Edison, and from that Inven- 
tion was perfected the Edison Phonograph 
which today is considered the most perfect 
Instrument for reproducing music, voice 
and other sounds. 

For you the Edison Phonograph means 
constant and varied entertainment in your 
own home. 

Do you want to hear the old songs that 
we used to sing and which are treasured 
memories to most of us? The Edison Phono- 
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singers can. 

Would you like to hear your favorite 
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rendered? The Edison Phonograph will 
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You may hear the songs of great singers, 
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circle of your own friends. 




Amberol Recor 

Mr. Edison did not consider his Phono- 
graph good enough with Records that 
played only two minutes, so he experi- 
mented uniil ho produced a Record which 
will play twice as long. It is no la-ircr than 
the other Record. It is played on the fame 
Phonograph by means of an attachment 
which your dealer 

Edison T?ecords aro made in Bohemian, Cuban, 
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ltul'an, Norwegian, I olish. Spanish, *-w euish, elc, 

Even if yo'i are not ready to buy at < nee tr" to 
the nearest Edi-on Ptnro and hour thin w nd< rful 
home entertainer, the Edison Phonograph Ask 
your dealer f r a catalogue of Phonographs and 
a catalogue of selections. 



NATIONAL PHONOGRAPH COMPANY, 149 Lakeside Ave., Orange, N. J. 



61 Q£ AA 1UT-S11 rDCI? *o any one who can offer an improve- 
XV1111 W KJljEj ment on the DoLOACH SAW MILL. 

The original saw mill giving two motions from one disc. Four horse-power 
engine guaranteed to cut 200)fc. board lumber in ten hours, and larger sizes in 
proportion. Friction s t works and receder. Triplex steel dogs, diamond track. 
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J. A. Hodges, Oak v, Co., is now using first De Loach Mill ever made (22 year* 
ago) and says it is still doing* good work. 

Send for catalog of the celebrated DeLoacn line of Saw Mills, Edgers, Shingle 
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Agents wanted in every county. DoLoaoh Mill Mfg. Co., Box 777, Bridgeport, Ala. 




10 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 4, 1909 



Woma n's R M. Society. 

Conducted by Mrs. L. W. Crawford, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



LARGE GIVING. 

Jesus taught that the size of a gift 
is measured, not so much by the 
amount given, as by that from which 
It is taken, when he said to the 
churchmen that the poor widow had 
"cast in m re than they all. Such 
givers have lived in every age — are 
living today. Were an equal desire 
and a commensurate effort found In 
the heart and plan of the average 
giver, how great were the possibili- 
ties of the church of the Living God 
today! Instead of the battle cry, 
"The world for Christ in this genera- 
tion!" soon would be heard haJlelu- 
jahs over the world already won. 

A few examples of large giving by 
those in the lowly places and in nar- 
row lines are recorded here. 

Two young women are employed in 
a factory in a large city. One pays 
her board, and from the remainder 
of her income gives eighty dollars a 
year toward the support of native 
•workers in the foreign field besides 
what she contributes to work at home. 
The other lives three miles from the 
city and walks to and from the fac- 
tory where she does piece work. By 
working an extra hour in the morning 
and another in the evening she earns 
from thirty-five to forty dollars per 
week. Her -assistance is needed in 
the home and for this she gives $12 
every week. She restricts .her own 
personal expenditures to one hundred 
and fifty dollars a year. The balance 
goes into the Lord s treasury. Out 
of this she supports thirty-two native 
workers in foreign fields through the 
General Missionary Society and the 
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. 
She also has her work in her local 
church. 

A farmer's wife found it difficult to 
get more than her dues for the Wo- 
man's Foreign Missionary Society, 
which she so much loved because she 
loved Him who was her stay and 
coa:fort. She prayed earnestly for 
a larger gift. One day her husband 
told her there was a little calf in the 
barn that must be raised by hand, 
and she might have it to do as she 
liked with it. She carefully tended 
it, thinking this would provide the 
gift she had asked for; but her best 
cars did not save its life. Most wo- 
men would have been utterly discour- 
aged, and said, "Now, Lord, I can do 
nothing more; thou knowest my heart 
ana what I desired to do for thee." 
Not so this earnest woman. She cour- 
ageously undertook a ta:k entirely- 
new to her; skinned the calf, cured 
the skin, took it to the market and 
sold it for one dollar. While this dol- 
lar was much less than her hope, she 
joyfully put it into the treasury of 
the society. 

A teacher early in her career be- 
came interested in a young Chinese 
girl and undertook her support. Her 
o.\n equiimcnt was meager and her 
salary small. She realized that she 
must have further preparation to ad- 
vance In her profession and for this 
she saved and worked. Many young 
women would have felt they must 
under the circumstances, cease to 
care for the Chinese girl. This young 
woman had become deeply interested 
in her charge, and a realization of her 
responsibility was settled deep in her 
heart. In order to continue the sup- 
port of her protege she boarded her- 
self while at school, until both had 
graduated. The "willing miTrd 1 ' finds 
a solution for its problem- when: God 
leads. 

Twenty years ago a note came to a 
Branch treasurer of tne Woman's For- 



eign Missionary Society, containing 
the one sentence: "Fifty cents for 
Jesus." When the treasurer sent 
the receipt she asked for a little of 
the history of the donor. She found 
her to be an old lady, a reader of 
Friend, and much interested in all 
Christian work. The farm on which 
she lived was small and yielded but 
slight returns; but her needs were 
few, her wants simple, and self-de- 
nial for Christ's sake was her chief 
joy- 

A later letter with a dollar bore 
this message: "I have asked the 
Lord to let me have some money for 
His cause. I do not own anything of 
value except an old spinning-wheel 
that belonged to my grandmother, 
which has stood in my room for twen- 
ty-five years. It is the only precious 
thing I have, and I want to give* my 
best for Jesus. I have sold it for one 
dollar.' It cost me many tears to part 
with it, but I know God will accept 
my offering; which I send with many 
prayers." This dollar seemed too 
precious to deposit with other money 
and the treasurer laid it aside for 
some days. Finally it was sent to 
the Home for Homeless Women in 
Lucknow, India, by a missionary. In 
due time a letter came from a mis- 
sionary in charge of this Hame, and 
was sent to the dear olu lady. After 
receiving this letter she wrote: "It 
filled my cup to overflowing. I spread 
tne letter before me as- I prayed and 
wept, feeling it to be such an honor 
to receive a letter from a real mis- 
sionary, telling of her work. How 
I did pray over it and thank God for 
the privilege of doing a littl for Him!" 

Some years later the blessed wo- 
man wrote again: "Ever since I gave 
my precious spinning-wheel to the 
Lord, my blessings have been bound- 
less. That gift has made the springs 
gush forth and showers of spiritual 
blessings have come- to- me." At an- 
other time she writes: "I send you 
ten dollars, five for foreign missions 
and five for home missions. How I 
do praise the Lord that the wish of 
my heart has been granted, and I am 
permitted to give to the needy as the 
blessed Lord has prospered, and 
as we all promise to do when we 
join the church. Oh, the goodness of 
Cod! Nothing I ask Him but I re- 
ceive — even the fullness of His love!" 

In one letter she says: "I nave 
asked the Lord for work that I may 
contribute to His cause, and He has 
ans.vered by sending me four carpets 
to weave, and with it the needed 
strength just as he al.vays has. With 
the enclosed dollar, I send my love to 
all the sisters who labor for the needy 
ones." 

Again she writes: "I am eighty- 
four years old. How I wish I had a 
Thank Offering to send! God has 
been so good to unworthy me. I 
have asked Him to direct my mind 
to think of something I can do. I 
have a peach tree that was loaded 
very heavily with fruit; but much of 
it was stolen before it ripened. There 
is one large peach left, which is eight 
inches round. It looks very tempting. 
I shall call it my missionary peach. 
I am to receive a call from a teacher, 
and I will buy it and we will eat it 
together. I send four stamps (eight 
cents) to pay for it." This story was 
told by the treasurer in a meeting 
of a certain society, and twenty dol- 
lars was quickly, raised, and this 
dear -friend was ma.de a Life member 
of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society. Her joy was beyond expres- 
sion when she heard of it 



At the age of eighty-seven this wo- 
man of great faith, large gifts and 
abounding joy was received into her 
heavenly home. 

One writing of her says: "The 
gratitude for every blessing, the see- 
ing a Father's hand in every experi- 
ence, however trivial, the steadfast 
looking for opportunity for service in 
His name, which characterized this 
King's Daughter, makes one long that 
her prayers, which have already 
brought blessing to more than one 
tired worker, may become a yet great- 
er incentive to loving service for the 
Master through this memorial." " 

Does the joy that filled the soul of 
this woman, when she brought her 
gifts, large or small, to Him, fill our 
hearts when we bring our gifts? If 
not, is it not pos ible that we are 
withholding the gifts He wants most 
of all? We read:^ "They first gave 
their own selves," and after that were 
instructed to "grow in this grace al- 
so." God is the great giver; Christ 
is the greatest gift; His love is bound- 
less and He wants us to know Him 
and be like Him. — Selected. 



Dr. Miles* 
Anti-Pain Pills 

for Headache 



And Other Pains 




Take 
ONE- 
of These Little Tablets 
L AMD THE PAIN IS GOME., 



When God sets a period to our ml 
takes by some great failure, it is tin 
to begin a new paragraph. 



Medical Relief Free. 

Dr. J. A. TVillis, of Crawfordsvillo, 
Ind., will mail free to all sending him 
their addresses a package of PANSY- 
COMPOUND, a pure vegetable rem- 
edy which is a positive relief for con- 
stipation, indigesti'-in. dyspepsia, rheu- 
matism, and la grippe. 



"It is how we behave when we thi' 
nobody is looking, that is the rr 
measure and test of our lives. Almt 
everybody shows up pretty well 
dress pa»ade." 



CHURCHES. Sunday Schools. Ager 
make money getting up clubs selling 
Gem Clothes Line Holder. Sample, 
Plan free. Gem, Grand Rapids. Mich. 



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ome Builders 



Whether you build a cottage or a mansion, you y 
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Tiles and Grates. Nothing increases the satisfaction «£. 
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tion of these goods. Be sure to get our catalogue be- X 
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-4» 

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Odell Hardware Company, 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



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— - 



iste 




READ MY FREE OFFER 

alission is to make sick women well, and I want to send you, your daughter ?oUT 
sister, your mother, or any ailing friend & taV fifty-cent bos of Balm of Fi.-^ abso- 
lutely free. It is a remedy that cures Wcman's ailments, and I want to tell you all 
about it — just how to enre yourself ri^ht at home without the aid of a doctor — and the 
best of it is that it will not in the least interfere with your work or ccco;^.i:on. Balm of 
Figs is just the remedy to make sick women well and weak women stron~, and I car- orovo 
it — let prove it to you — I will gladly do it. r -yz I have never heard of anytkl-ig that 
does so quickly aud sursiy care woman's aPfcentb. No internal dosing- necessity — it iss 
local treatment, yrt it has to its credit some of the morl extraordinary cure' on record. 
Therefore, I want to place it in t ie hands of every woman suffering with 
any term of Lcucorrhea, Paihfu! Periods. Ulceration. Inflammatio:., 
Disp'ac^ment or Falling of ths "tfomb. Ovarian or Uterine Tumors or 
CroVj ths, or any of the wcaknsa*>»*c so common to women. 

This fifiy-cerst i>ff Balm af Figs 
will not cust you one cent 

I will send it to you absolutely free, to prove to y^u its splendid quali- 
ties, and then if you wish to continue further, it will cost you on I j a few 
cents a week. I do not believe there is another remedy equal to 
Balm of Figs and I am willing to prove my faith by sending out 
these fifty-cent boxes free. So, my reader, irrespective of your 
past experience, write to me at once— today — and I will send 
you the treatment entirely free by return mail, and if you so 
desire, undoubtedly I can refer you to some one near ynu who can | 
personally testify tothe creat and lastingcures that have resulted 
from the use of Balm of Figs. But after all. the Very best test 
of anything is a personal trial of it. and I know a fifty-cent box 
of Balm ^f Figs will convince you of its merit. Nothing is e 
Convincing as the actual test of the article itself . Will you pi v 
Balm of Figs this test ? Write to me todav. and remember I will 
bladly send you a fifty-cent box of Balm of Figs for the asking. Address 
MRS. HARRIET M. RICHARDS, Box 248 D Joliet, Illinois. 




In 



Sit 1 --- 



February 4, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



Woman's H. M. Society. 

Mrs. W. L. Nicholson, Editor, Charlotte, N. C. 



"Methought that in a solemn church I 
stood, 

Its marble acres, worn with knees and 
feet, 

Lay spread from door to door, from 

street to street, 
Midway the form hung high upon the 

rood 

Of Him who gave His life to be our 
good. 

Beyond priests flitted, bowed and mur- 
mured meet 

Among the candles shining still and 
sweet, 

Men came and went and worshipped 

as they could; 
And still their dust a woman with a 

broom. 

Bowed to her work, kept sweeping to 
the door, 

When saw I slow through all the pil- 
lars gloom 
Across the church a silent figure come. 
'Daughter,' He said, 'thou sweepest 

well my floor!' 
'It is the Lord,' I cried, and saw no 

more." 



as r 
of i. 
Juli; 

"■\ 

Che: 
Cht 



Dear District Secretaries: — Do you 
realize that the end of the last quarter 
approaches? Will you not endeavor to 
send in complete reports this time? 
Think what it means to send in the 
last quarter's report complete. Begin 
now. Visit your auxiliaries, write all 
of your officers, urge treasurers to col- 
lect and secretaries to report and pres- 
idents to see that the year winds up in 
a proper manner. This is your work 
— nobly have you done it. This one 
more time this year I beseech you to 
send me a complete report. 

Dear Auxiliary Presidents: — Your 
position is so very important in our 
body politic I hardly know how to ap- 
proach you on this last important call 
of the year. But won't you go care- 
fully over your field, make notes, lay 
plans, then call an execution meeting. 
The auxiliary whose officers do not 
meet in execution session may not 
"die the death," but certainly it can- 
not "live the life." 

Confer as to best methods of wind- 
ing up the year, make definite plans, 
and enlist all to help carry them out. 

Dear Auxiliary Treasurer: — On you 
devolves the successful close of the 
year as finances go. It is a small part 
of a treasurer's privilege (?) to re- 
ceive and keep account of the moneys 
paid in; she it is who is to see that all 
dues, etc., are paid. It involves work, 
may be sacrifice of time to accom- 
plish this, but dear treasurer, 'tis for 
the King! Make up a list of your mem- 
bers, giving exact amount due by each. 
Visit each member in person or get 
some ladies to help you. Few there 
are who will not meet their obligations 
if tactfully presented. An auxiliary 
should account for, at the very least, 
$1.45 plus $1.00 for each member. 

Dear Auxiliary Corresponding Sec- 
retary: — 'Tis to you the final appeal is 
made, for when you fail us the ma- 
chinery just stops. You are the motive 
power. The last quarter's report is so 
important; 

Won't you visit your different offi- 
cers and get definite report from each 
one and send, by March first, "to your 
district secretary? Please write to me 
of your work, etc., but never send me 
a quarterly report. That should go to 
your district secretary. Yours, 

MRS. T. J. COPELAND, 
Corresponding Secretary. 



Early Cabbage Plants for sale by N. H. Blitch Co., 
Meggetls, S. C. See our ad. on page 13. Don't forget it 
Our plants are sprayed before shipped, to kill all ice and wcrms 



THE LAY WOMEN— THEIR WORK- 
PAST AND PRESENT. 

Have you been especially interested 
in this subject selected for January 
and February meetings, The Lay 
Women? 

What have they done? 

More than paid their dues and con- 
ference expense fund and mayhap on 
tne Pledge. This is really the least of 
what they have done. They have made 
the civilized world missionary in 
thought, at least. More that is than 
the list of schools and missionaries 
they support. They have moulded pub- 
lic opinion and thus made possible the 
great Laymen's Movement. You do 
not believe that? Let me illustrate: 
Whom, think you, really responsible 
for our almost national prohibition 
statutes? The men who cast the votes 
in the elections? Nay, verily! 'Twas 
the women of the W. C. T. U. who a 
decade ago began and never faltered. 
They, and they alone created a public 
opinion that crystalized into ballots 
that fair May day. And so the Lay 
Women organized their missionary so- 
cieties, King's Messengers, Bright Jew- 
els, Brigades, Cradle Rolls, etc., work- 
ing everywhere always for the Christ, 
and the dark places began to grow 
light, the indifferent to become bat- 
teries of energy, and lo! The Layman's 
Movment, which has ,for its daring 
motto, "The World for Christ in This 
Generation," became a possibility. 

What can she do? Rather, what can 
she not do? 

I place first, "Refrain from criti- 
cism." We need to learn anew every 
once in a while that church work is 
not necessarily being an officer in the 
missionary society, or chairman of a 
committee. Oft times the most prac- 
tical church work we can do is to up- 
hold the president or chairman, to re- 
frain from criticizing those trying their 
best to do the work we have given 
them to do. It comes second only to 
telling them occasionally that they are 
doing well and that we appreciate their 
services. 

And yet another way they may 
serve. Read. "What," do you say? 
"Dou you call that church work?" I 
do, most emphatically. The very idea 
of attempting to do service for our 
Lord within the pale of the Methodist 
Church in this Conference and not 
reading the Christian Advocate. Do 
we desire to do home mission work? 
Let us read "Our Homes" and know 
our work. This only the first grade 
work of course. Read anything that 
makes us think kindly and charitably 
of our neighbor, not the dear friend 
who lives on our square, but she for 
whom we can do a service. 

Another, Friendly Visiting. I do not 
mean visiting friends, though happy 
we may be if we make friends of them. 
Visit where we are needed, because we 
love those who need us. One lady said, 
"Well, suppose they should return the 
visit!" Oh! If they only would; then, 
indeed, we would know that it was a 
seal to our ministrations. I would not 
obliterate all social distinction. No 
indeed. The love must be leavened 
with common sense. You would not 
invite your washwoman, even though 
she be Anglo-Saxon, to drink tea with 
your care-free- up-town friend, out of 
consideration for both, but if she of 
the toil deliberately seeks you, thank 
God for having allowed you to do ser- 
vice for him. 

"I do not know what to talk to them 
about." Oh! don't you? Sisters, you 
have much in common. Husbands: 
That never failing subject of interest. 



Children: No mother so poor or so ig- 
norant or so sad but can talk on that 
subject. Give an opportunity to Oifer 
the book or magazine that may mean 
so much by way of diversion to a 
whole family. Sickness: Oh! They al- 
ways know how to talk about that. 
There is your opportunity to get in 
work for sanitation and to tell them 
how you have been comforted so often 
by reading that fourteenth chapter of 
John. All of our favorite subjects ex- 
cept the servant question; that really 
is unsuitable. We need visitors with 
love in their hearts, with tact in their 
manner, with medicine and wood and 
flour in the back yard, to be used if 
needed. 

I have omitted all such technical 
church work as is usually considered— 
not even mentioning giving — thinking 
that if we refrain from criticism for 
our firstly, speak words of apprecia- 
tion for our secondly, read suitably 
for our thirdly, and fourthly, go to 
our friendly visiting as to a vocation 
to which we are called, we will return 
some eventide "bearing our sheaves" 
with us. MRS. COPELAND. 



THIS WILL INTEREST MANY. 
F. W. Park hurst, the Boston pub- 
lisher, says that if any one aifiicted 
with rheumatism in any form, neural- 
gia or kidney trouble, will send their 
address to him at 7U4-35 Carney Bldg., 
Boston, Mass., he will uirtcl them to 
a perfect cure. He has nothing to 
sell or give; only tells you how he was 
cured after years of search fur relief. 
Hundreds have tested it with success. 



Jesus Christ has laid hold of some 
of the most uncompromising of human- 
ity, and has made saints of them. 



THE GEM HOTEL 

The Only Strictly European 
Hotel in Charlotte. 
Formerly the Buford Annex, 10 South 

Tryon Street. 
Centrally Located, First-Class Di ling 
Room and Lurch Room. Rooms 
With or Without Bath. 
E. F. CRESWELL, Manager. 



The success of Christ's work any- 
where is helpful to the success of 
Christ's work everywhere. — Rev. Peter 
Thompson. 



Report of W. H. M. S., W. N. C Con.., Third Qoar., Ending Dc . 1/08 



DISTRICTS. 


Dues. 


Baby Roll. 


Week of 
Prayer 


BabyM.B. 


Brigade. 


SI. 00 Extin 
per 
Member. 


— p c 
£- ^ 


■a 
K 


Thank 
Ottering. 


S : f t 

T 3 .9 
5."** u 

X 


o 

ci = 

* o* = 

8* 

O ' ' 


Minutes 


Ashevllle - „ 


$28. (JO 


SI. 25 


30.65 


$3.80 




$1 .00 


$5 00 








2.10 




Charlotte 


70.13 


4.CW 


44.83 
12 21 


.18 


"¥.82 


2.00 










2.70 


".10 


Franklin 


34.65 




.41 




nso 






1.35 


Greensboro 


4V95 


■ .25 


52.73 


2.80 




12. 25 










40.00 


1.20 


"."§6 


Mnrganton , 


2.80 




' 1.00 












Mount Airy 


31.25 




31.35 




6.00 






.90 




1.05 




Salisbury 


10.05 




9. 35 


— _-— 1_, — 


2.0) 








.51 




Shelby 

Statesville 


12.65 
25. 75 


"¥.¥> 


6.60 
15.96 


3.45 
2. 67 


2.00 


3.00 
1. 00 


I'.'.'.'.l 








.50 
1.70 




Winston 


26. 80 


2.75 


.26.92 


4. 31 




4.00 










.25 




Wayriesville 


20.45 


.50 


1.00 












.60 


























11 .50. 2-12. 10 


18. &> 


4 82 


31.25 


5.00 1.50 


Too 


-10.00 


11.9611.00 



*7 1 R0 
126.76 
50. 12 
154.08 
3.80 
70.55 
21.91 
2f. 20 
50. 33 
65.03 
22.55 



DISBURSEMENTS 

By check to Gen. Treas. . . 

C'k Cor. Sec, office ex. ... 

By c'k Mrs. Siler. ex. acct. . 

Cor. Sec. Adv. Ex. Acct ... 25.00 

Mrs. T. F. Marr, Winston dis- 
trict sec'y... 3.00 

Mrs. England, Statesville dis- 
trict sec'y 7.07 

Mrs. F. E. Ross, Treas. Brevard 25.00 

Mrs. W. L. Nicholson, pre:s 

superintendent 10.00 

Mrs. F. E. Ross, treas. Brevard 1.50 

To balance 193.29 



RECEIPTS. 

$650.67 Balance .$184.41 

17.15 Total cash rec'd from Aux.... 663.13 
6.60 Part dues returned by Gen. 

Treasurer ... ... 78.24 

From individuals on Scarritt 

Scholarship . .. . ... 9.50 

From sale anuual minutes . . . 2.00 



Total ... : '..$939.2S 



Total $939.28 



Making More Money Out of 



is merely a question of using enough of the right 
kind of fertilizers. - - - 



p © 



ginia 



are the right kind. 

The cotton plant cannot feed on barren land. Study 
your soil. Find cut what it lacks. Then apply the 
necessary fertilization end the results will surprise you. 

See what Mr. W. C. Iliys of Smith Station, Ala., did. He says: 
"I planted about ;0 acres of some 'gray sandy land' that had beer in 
cultivation for over 20 years, and used 300 pounds of Virginia- Caro- 
lina Fertilizers per acre, and I expect to gather 30 bales from 
the 50 acrts." This is why we say it is.the right kind. We have 
hundreds of letters like this, and- even stronger, in praise of Virginia- 
Carolina Fertilizer for cotton, y,;^, - ■' - : 

Get a copy cftbenev/ 1D0O Virginia-Carolina Farmers' Year Book 
from your fertilizer dealer, or write our .nearest sales office an 1 a copy 
will be sent you free. It contains fSCTtires of the capitols of all the 



Southern St_tes 

Sales CfSces 
Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Va. WttV&M'VM£. 

Columbia, s. c. r lTVi rgi ii iarGaro S i 

Atlanta, G 1. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Memphis, Tenn. 




aemical Co. 

-Sales Offices 

p.urham.f'N.b. 
•".eriarlestdn;-S. J C. 
Baltimore, TAX 1 
CcfumLus, G a. 
Montgomery, Ala* 
■Shieveport, La. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 4, 1909. 



Prevents Rust 



f=y> The Sunday School Lesson. DELICIOUS 




If you used your tools as often 
as a carpenter docs his — they'd 
never rust. Just before putting 
them away, rub a few drops of 
Household Lubricant overtherri. 
Then they'll keep their edge 
and won't rust. 

HOUSEHOLD 
Lubricant 

should be used for 
everything about the 
house that needs oiling 
— forsewinir machines, 
bicycles.clothes wring- 
ers, etc. It will not 
corrode or turn 
rancid. Sold by 
dealers everywhere 
in the handy can 
that can be closed 
with itsown spout. 
STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

(IHCORPORATEO) 




HUSBAND INSISTED 

* 

Some ladies allow a simple little 
trouble to grow into a big one, just 
for lack of the right medicine. 

Too much trouble; too much ex- 
pense; don't know what medicine 
to take. 

All excuses ; and poor ones, too. 

Such ladies need some one, with 
their own best interests at heart, who 
will see to it that they begin to take 
Cardui at once. 

Now, Mrs. Rena Hare, of Pierce, 
Pla., luckily for her, had a husband, 
who, she says, "insisted on my tak- 
ing Cardui." 

In describing her plight, she uses 
these words : "I was a sufferer from 
severe female trouble. I had pains 
in my side, drawing pains in legs, 
fainty spells, could not sleep. In 
fact, it was a general break-down. I 
found no relief till I took Cardui, 
when the first bottle helped me and 
now I am almost well." 

Your druggist will gladly sell you 
a bottle of Cardui, with full direct- 
ions for use. 

It is purely vegetable, non-intoxi- 
cating, and reliable remedy, for all 
women, young and old, who suffer 
from any of the common female 
troubles. Try Cardui. 



f5ooato ? ioooQ 

i A Year ihth 

v ^ j REAL ESTATE 
V^ 7 ': - BUSINESS,. 



W« will teach foa by mail Real E=tat«. General Brokeraie, 
and Insurance, and appoint you Special Representative 
of the largest co-oporat i vo real estate and brokerage company. 
Oar co-operati vodepartment will gi ve y"U more choice, salable 
property to handle than anyotherinstitution.andyou can com- 
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and without any investment of capital A Commercial Law 
Course free to each represen'^iive. Write for 62-paeebook 
free. YheCrosaf ompany. 30 Reaper Block. Chicago 



WANTED. 



Responsible man with horse and bug- 
gry In each community, salary $5.00 to 
$10.00 per day, to take orders from own- 
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machine agents, to make a business con- 
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"IS THE BEST." 

Write for Catalogue 
Piedmont Buiinen Collage, 
Lynchburtf. V*. 



LKSSON VI. — FEBRUARY 7, 1909. 

True and False Brotherhood. 

(Acts 4, 32 to 5, 11.) 
Time— A.Li. 30-35. Place— Jerusalem. 



Golden Text. — Lying lips are an 
abomination to the Lord; but they 
that deal truly are his delight. — Prov. 
12, 22. 



DROPSY 



Cured; quick relief; re- 
to 20 days; 30 to 60 days 
moevs all swelling In 8 
effects permanent cure. Trial treatment 
given free to sufferers; nothing fairer. 
For circulars, testimonials and free trial 
treitl'nent write 

Or. H. H. Green's Sons. Box X, 
Atlanta, Qa. 



In Troublous Times. 

One may have peace in the midst 
of storm. So the disciples of the 
early church discovered. The author- 
ities were breathing out threatenings 
and slaughter (v. 29), but the disci- 
ples were filled with the Holy Spirit 
and spake the word of God with bold- 
ness (v. 31). In the world, says Je- 
sus, ye shall have tribulation; but in 
Me -ye shall have peace. The wrath 
of the authorities was not without 
its evangelistic value. It called at- 
tention to the object of persecution. 
The contest of the weaker with the 
stronger always provokes sympathy 
for the weaker. A little further on 
we read that "a great company of 
priests were obedient to the faith" 
(6, 7). The witness of patient and 
submissive martyrdom for a convic- 
tion is never fruitless. Moreover the 
persecution but brought the disci- 
ples more closely together through 
the common bond of suffering. "The 
multitude of them that believed were 
of one heart and soul." Persecution 
is not the worst evil that can come 
to a church or to an individual, pro- 
vided always that it is for righteous- 
ness' sake, badly off as the early 
church was through the bitter enmity 
of the Jewish hierarchy, its condition 
was vastly better than that of the in- 
solent and unspiritual body which the 
hierarchy represented. Better, far 
better to suffer and be alive than to 
be at ease and dead. 

The Common Life. 

The social life of Judaism was 
bound up in the religion of Judaism. To 
leave the faith was to forfeit social 
standing and even the opportunity 
for a livelihood. The early church 
had many converts from among the 
poor; but they had also many con- 
verts who became poor for Christ's 
sake. The care of such was an inter- 
est of prima concern. The disciples 
met the problem with manifest sense, 
courage and evangelistic cogency. 
Like true Christians they said, "We 
shall meet the need or share it. They 
put their duties before their rights. 
Men and women with property 
brought what they had to the com- 
mon fund, saying, "This is ours, not 
mine." The object and end of their 
devotion was to make sure that none 
among them lacked. The divine ap- 
proval was instant and characteris- 
tic. "Great grace was upon them 
all." 

The Barnabas Type. 

A specific case is cited. Just why 
it is not easy to say. Perhaps to serve 
as a foil for the story of Ananias 
which follows. The case is that of 
one Joses, who, apparently, upon be- 
coming a disciple was named Barna- 
bas, "Son of Exhortation," because in 
a special way he seemed to be a man 
filled with the Spirit; or, as he has 
been called, "a kind of Paraclete to 
the church." He was a Levite. The 
orthodox tradition must have been 
strong in him. But he had recognized 
in the new movement the persuasion 
of a deeper spirituality; and he had 
broken with his traditions at the call 
of the stronger duty-. - It was the spir- 
it and not the airount of his contribu- 
tion that the historian cared to exalt. 



Whatever the field was, he sold it 
and brought the money and laid it at 
the apostle's feet. The Barnabas 
type is much easier to imagine and 
admire than it is to imitate. His un- 
feigned faith, the ardor of his devo- 
tion, the catholicity of his charity, the 
ready compassion and the freehand- 
ed benevolence — all mark him out as 
the type of disciple which constitutes 
the best evidence for the divine ori- 
gin of Christiniaty. 

The Ananias Type. 
The Ananias type follows the mo- 
tions while it denies the spirit of 
Christianity. No doubt the munifi- 
cence of Barnabas provoked approv- 
ing comment; the example proved 
contagious. It is quite possible that 

Ananias took the first steps from 
a genuinely charitable impulse; his 
first thought may have been altogeth- 
er admirable. But he soon found 
himself unequal to his own ideals. 

He could transfer his property to 
money. That part of the transaction 
would soon become public. The in- 
cense of public praise and approval 
was as the breath of life to him. To 
part from his money? He had not 
reckoned with himself, or with the 
binding power of his past. What part 
his wife bore in the transaction is on- 
ly hinted at. She knew in advance 
of the deception to be practiced. It 
must therefore have been talked over 
and agreed upon. And it is here that 
the really despicable nature" of the 
transaction shows itself. As Peter 
said, the property was his own; he 
had not been called upon to sell it, 
nor to g-ive the proceeds of the sale. 
He could have remained in good and 
rtgular standing in the community 
had he declined to consider either 
proposition. But "He brought a cer- 
tain part." The act, judged by the 

motive and intent, was thoroughly 
dishonest. He was not the lover of 
men but the liar and the hypocrite. 

\nu as s 1 ch Peter oxposed him and 
G r: i die I 1 >.a\. 

The Judcj-vent. 
If one asks why such summary 
judgment should be executed upon 
these two, and why liars and hypo- 
crites have enjoyed such large im- 
munity in all the centuries following, 
the answer may not be so easy giv- 
en. Never. neless, it must be appa- 
rent that for the early church — and it 
might be equally valid for the church 
of today — a diastic discipline of this 
sorr. woi .d be immensely impressive 
as a valuing. Lyh,^ is the besetting 
sin of the oriental; it is a second na- 
ture to him. The disciple must learn 
at once and in a way not easy to for- 
get that truthfulness is a distinct 
Christian requirement. As one out- 
come of the tragedy "great fear came 
upon all that heard it." God is not 
afraid of retribution as an evangelis- 
tic motive. While the memory of the 
fate of Ananias and Sapphira re- 
mained fresh in the minds of the dis- 
ciples the easy habit of lying was 
more strongly resisted. It was a 
startling way of changing the current 
of popular opinion about lying and hy- 
pocrisy; but the change had to come 
and to come early. Ananias and Sap- 
phira were the worst, but the rest of 
the world in all succeeding time has 
been the better for the lesson. The 
incident has made memorable the 
truth most necessary for man to 
know that into the kingdom of hea- 
ven, whether above or below, there 
shall in no wise enter whatsoever 
maketh- a lie. He who is our Master 
is the Truth; we are His disciples 
only as we love and do the truth. — N. 
Y. Christian Advocate. 



Fruit Flavors 

A peculiarity of Jell-0 desserts that 
has much to do with their popularity is 
the clear-cut and smooth fruit flavor, 
without a trace of the "sickish" sweet 
that spoils most dessert dishes. 

Jell-0 

desserts are as nutritive, healthful and 

wholesome as they are delicious and 
beautiful. 

liy the way, it is scientifically admitted 
that any food that pleases the eye and 
appeals to the taste has the effect of in- 
creasing the flow of the gastric juices, 
and sostiniulatesthe process of digestion. 

This applies to all Jell-O desserts. 

Try this one to-day : 

ALMOND CHERRY. 

Dissolve one package of Clicirv Jell-O in one 
pint boiling water, l'our half into mould or 
bowl. Just as it begins to harden, drop in a row 
ol blanched almonds. When hard enough pour 
in rest of Jell-O and add another row of almonds. 

A Jell-O dessert, in any of the seven 
flavors, costs only 10 cents and serves 
six. Two packages, costing 20 cents, 
make dessert for a dozen people. 

The flavors are : Lemon, Orange, 
Strawberry, Raspberry, Peach Choco- 
late and Cherry. 




Sold by all grocers. 
Illustrated Recipe Book, free. 
The Genesee Pare Food Co., Le Roy, N. Y 



The railroad builder affords a good 
example to the character builder. 
What tremendous obstacles he over- 
comes that he may attain his end! 
He tunnels the mountains, spans the 
rivers and gorges. Patiently he toils 
through long lengths of time and with 
great expenditure of treasure that the 
road-bed may be laid and trains may 
carry their burden of frieght and pas- 
sengers to their destined place. Shall 
he who undertakes to build charac- 
ter be balked by difficulties, discour- 
aged by obstacles, retarded by hind- 
rances? He builds for. time and eter- 
nity. There is no work in which man 
may engage that can excel the build- 
ing of God-like character. In it he 
uses the costliest material and calls 
into play the finest skill, and vast en- 
terprises depend on whether his work 
is well done. — Selected. 



Early Cabbagj Plants for sa'e by N. H. Blitch Co., 
Meggetls, S. C. See our ad. on pag; 13. Don't forget it 
Our plants are sprayed before shipped, to kiL all lice and worms 

Post Cards FRK 

Home of Andrew Jackson, State Capitols, hunt- 
ing scenes, and other souvenir cards of national 
interest, TEN in all, FE EE to persons who send 
J no. F. Draughon, Nashville, Tenn., names and ad- 
dresses of 4 or more young people most likely to 
r.ttend business college or take lessons Br Mail. 

IF YOU want TO F:CEfrom the DOLLAR-A-DAY 
class into the FIYE-DOLLAR-A-DAY class, then 
Sl'ART RIGHT by asking for FREE catalogue 

draughon;s 

Practical Business College 

Washington, Raleigh or Colombia 



February 4, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



is 



The Farm and Garden. 



GOLD FELLED 



THE SHORT COURSE IN AGRICUL- 
TURE. 

Prof. C. N. Newman tells us that 
the short course class at the A. & M. 
College this year is the largest in 
the history of the institution. This 
is encouraging news, and is evidence 
of the good work being done by Pres- 
ident Hill, Professor Newman and 
their associates. 

The thirty-eight farmers, young 
and middle-aged, who are taking the 
course this year, are men who will 
go back to their farms with new ideas 
and fresh ambitions and who will be- 
come active helpers in the upbuild- 
ing of the state's agricultural inter- 
ests. 

It is, of course, impossible to more 
than teach the fundamental princi- 
ples of agriculture in a seven-weeks' 
course; but it is these fundamental 
principles which most farmers need 
most to know. They are already fa- 
miliar with the practical side of farm 
work, and when they have learned 
the "why" as well as the "how" of 
good farming methods, they are in 
a position to do really good work and 
achieve great success. The value of 
these short courses is as yet greatly 
under-estimated. They not only teach 
practical lessons of the highest val- 
ue, but also fill the students with as- 
pirations and ambitions which are 
worth equally as much to them. 

That farmers do not appreciate the 
advantages offered by those courses 
is too clearly proved by the very 
small attendance. Thirty-eight is, of 
course, a great and encouraging gain 
over the fourteen of last year, but in 
Wisconsin there were in attendance 
on the agricultural short courses at 
the State University in 1906, 410 stu-. 
dents; in 1907, 601; and in 1908, 701. 

Where the farmers of a state go 
by the hundreds to its highest insti- 
tution of learning for the study of 
agriculture, one would naturally ex- 
pect to find farming interests ad- 
vancing. And this is just what we 
find. Wisconsin and other states 
of the northwest have shown in the 
last decade a wonderful development 
along agricultural lines, and the farm- 
ers there have attained to a general 
degree of prosperity of which we 
have scarcely dreamed. 

There are just as great — we be- 
lieve greater — opportunities in the 
South as in the North or West. All 
that is necessary is for us to take 
advantage of them. Education along 
the lines of farm work is a necessity 
if we are ever to make farming pay 
as it should; and these short courses 
offer to the busy farmer practical in- 
struction of the highest value at a 
small co t. 

The A. & M. Colleges are ready to 
do their part; let the farmers do 
theirs. Begin right now to prepare 
for a few weeks with the short course 
"boys" next winter; and let's have 
at least a hundred students at each 
agricultural college in the South. 
Such a result would mean that the 
farming interests of the South had 
taken a great step forward. — Progres- 
sive Farmer. 



to get a compact and short-jointed 
plant with good sized bolls and plen- 
ty of them. 

Select a variety that suits your soil 
and climate. In the northern part of 
the cotton belt and in the boll wee- 
vil territory an early variety is need- 
ed. For an early variety the King is 
good, if you can get it pure; but so 
far as I have seen there is very lit- 
tle pure King cotton in North Caro- 
lina now; and it may be the same 
in other sections. For a medium ear- 
ly cotton, the Culpepper is very good, 
and you can get seed from the North 
Carolina Experiment Station at West 
Raleigh. 

I would plant a separate patch of 
the variety selected especially for 
seed, and would give it the very best 
attention. Go through the patch and 
watch the growth, and when you see 
a plant running up long-legged and 
weedy, pull it out to prevent its pol- 
len from being carried to other 
plants. Give the plants plenty of 
room for full development. Try to 
get the whole of a uniform, bushy and 
short-jointed character. Then select 
your seed at the second picking, from 
the most prolific plants. 

Then do not carry the bolls that 
you save to a commercial gin and 
get them mixed with all sorts of seed, 
but gin them at home, even if you 
have to pick them out by hand. Bet- 
ter have a small machine for this pur- 
pose. By this plan you will see at 
once a great improvement in the 
plants. But do not stop and think 
you have gained a new variety buL 
keep up the seed patch every year 
constantly striving to get nearer and 
nearer to your ideal of what a cot 
ton plant should be for your use, and 
it will not be long before your neigh- 
bors will want some of your seed. 

I saw two fields of cotton last sum- 
mer. There was only the public road 
between them. In one field the cot- 
ton was a rich green color, and per- 
fectly uniform in height, not a tall, 
lanky plant to be seen. Across the 
road the cotton was yellowish and 
was all sorts of heights, evidently 
badly mixed seed. I asked who the 
good field belonged to, and they said, 
"He runs a dairy and makes man- 
ure." That accounted for the good 
color of his cotton, but did not ac- 
count for the uniformity of the crop, 
which was evidently due to careful 
selection of the seed. And here, too, 
we see the importance of a rotation 
that produced feed for cattle. One 
may not run a dairy, but every farm- 
er should raise feed for stock and 
make manure, and after improving 
the seed the important point is to 
farm, and make more corn, more oats 
and wheat and more cotton per acre. 
Good seed will not do everything for 
you if you simply grow cotton year 
<ifter j ear cn the same land, and owe 
the fertilizer man and the merchant. 
■Jood seed and good farming must 
go together since good seed without 
good faiurou; will never make you 
or your fara. rich. — Progressive Far- 
mer. 



HAVE A PATCH OF COTTON FOR 
SEED. 

On the improvement of the crop in 
any plant we must take the whole 
plant into consideration. If a man 
selects cotton seed solely for big bolls 
he may get these, but have long-leg- 
ged, late and unproductive plants. If 
on the other hand he selects solely 
for the number of bolls, he may get 
a prolific variety, but very small bolls 
and short staple. What we need is 



Faith begins as experiment, and 
ends as experience. — J. H. Jowett. 

TO DRIVE OUT MALARIA AND BUILD 
UP THE SYSTEM. 

Take the Old Standard Grove's Taste- 
less Chill Tonic. You know what you are 
taking. The formula Is plainly printed 
on every bottle, showing It Is simply 
Quinine and Iron In a tasteless form, 
and the most effectual form. For grown 
people- and children ROo 



GUARANTEED 

For 10 Years 

I Want to Loan You a Pair of TRUSIGHT 
SPECTACLES on Six Days Trial 

FREE! 



I want to introduce Trusight Spectacles to 
every reader of this paper. To do this I am 



My • Free Offer 

making a special one-third price offer. I want to send you a pair of genuine Tru- 
sight Spectacles in a Gold Filled Frame, guaranteed for 1 0 years, on 6 days' free trial. 

Send Me Your Name * win send you my perfect 

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you can test your own eyes as well as the most skilled optician. When you re- 
turn the Tester with your test I will send you a pair of Genuine $5.00 Trusight 
Spectacles, that will surely fit, on 6 days' free trial. You don't need to send any 
money — no deposit. Wear the glasses in your own home for six days and if 
perfectly satisfactory in every way — if they are the best glasses you ever saw 
at any price— send me only $1.65 and the spectacles are yours. If the glasses, 
for any reason, do not suit you— if you don't believe them to be the best bar- 
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Send No Money. 

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send you my Trusight Eye Tester by 
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Good Reliable Agents Wanted. 




THIS CASE FREE! 

This is my Orient Case; it is made of metal covered with 
Moroccoine leather, plush lined, with a patent spring 
fastener. Very attractive and will outlast any other case 
on. the market. Ask your local optician if he will sell 
you such a case as this for less than $1.00. By my special 
plan this case will be given free to those who answer this 
advertisement and take advantage of my special offer. 

E. 0. KOCH, Pres., TRUSIGHT SPECTACLE CO., 

1469 Friend Building, KANSAS CITY, MO. 



(COT OUT THIS COUPON) 

E. O. KOCH, Pres.. 

Trusight Spectacle Co., 
146J Friend Bldg., KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Please send me without cost and with- 
out obligation your Trusight Eye Tester 
and your special free case offer. 

Name 



P. O. 



State 



pon't sit arpund'the stove, and freeze 
\f»Hi | winterly r y6'uY'£ ice ^roasting and 



Drop us. 
and lea 

cheaply^one^f 1 
our Systgrss^^P 
be installed 
your ^hOus£. 
give a bealthful^e%n/^ 
temperature th/oughojit^iM//hg!ase:.%l 
\ A postal brings our ofySaSmmW 1 

CRAWjfoftjb.//; i 
Winston-Salem, N. ' 



:jie ^troubleVv 
sv more -diits'4 
less»i 

hea^tb^jfj>neof ' 
ojJf^JJgt^Water 
Ti fTlStea Tn Sys- 
^ terasj-^ - 



EARLY CI 




E PUNTS 



Steei Alio; (Jhorch ana school Belts. pfSmjd fog 



Make 
Money 
Raising 
Cabbage 

Do you want Early Cabbage and plenty of them too? 

If so, buy your plants from us. They are raised from the best seed, and grown 
on the sea islands of South Carolina, which on account of being surrounded by salt 
water, raise plants that are earlier and hardier than those grown in the interior. They 
can be set out sooner without danger from frost. Varieties: Early Jersey Wakefield, 
Charleston or Large Wakefield, Henderson's Succession and Flat Dutch. All plants 
carefully counted and packed ready for shipment, and best express rates in the South. 
Prices: $1.50 per single thousand, up to 4,000; 5,000 or more at $1.25 per thousand; 
10,000 and upwards at $1.00 per thousand. Other Plants Supplied— Lettuce, Onions and 
Beet ready now. Special T^ates on Large Lots of Plants. Everything F. O. B. Meggetts, 
S. C. The LL S. Agricultural Department established an Experimental Station on our 
farm to test all kinds of vegetables, especially cabbages. We will be pleased to give 
results of these experiments. Write to us. 

N. H. BLITCH COMPANY, Box 9, MEGGETTS, S. C. 



14 



NOkTrt CAROLINA OtffetSflAN ADVOCATE. 



February 4, 1909. 



Our Dead. 



"I am the resurrection and the Life." 
— Jesus. 

We will insert an obituary of 150 words 
free of charge. For the excess of 150 
words we charge one cent per word. 
Count the words in excess and send the 
money with obituary. Observe this rule, 
please. Do not put in original poetry. 

The above also applies to Tributes of 
Respect. 



obtrusiveness. He was always free 

from fume and fret. He lived in a 

good humor and died in child-like 

faith, repeating at the end of his life 

his childhood prayer: 

"Now I lay me down to sleep, 

I pray thee, Lord, my sould to keep. 

If I should dies before I wake, 

I pray thee, Lord, my sould to take." 

J. T. RATLEDGE. 



Gertrude Connelly.— God, in his mys- 
terious providence, has taken from us 
"our baby member." 

Only five and a half short years had 
she been with us, yet from the earli- 
est time that her tiny feet could tod- 
dle by mother's side she was always 
in her place in Sunday school, church 
and the missionary society. So reg- 
ular was she in her attendance that a 
chance absence always elicited inqui- 
ries. 

She had always said that she was 
going to be a missionary. At the No- 
vember meeting of the Missionary So- 
ciety she gave us a little recitation 
entitled "Little Givers." 

None of us dreamed that within 
three short weeks, with only a few 
hours' warning, we sh uld be called 
upon to "give to the 'Master" our "lit- 
tle missionary." Seldom does one so 
young make an - impress so strongly 
felt. 

Resolved 1. That we, the members 
of the Woman's Missionary Society, 
shall sadly miss her sweet, serious 
face, and beautiful, great, questioning 
blue eyes and winsome personality. 
We know that God knoweth best. He 
has said: "What I do, thou knowest 
not now, but thou shalt know hereaf- 
ter." 

2. That we extend to the fond fath- 
er and mother our heartfelt sympa- 
thy and recall to them Christ's prom- 
ises, "Blessed are they that mourn, for 
they shall be comforted." 

3. That these resolutions be spread 
upon the minutes of this society, a 
copy sent to the North Carolina Chris- 
tian Advocate^ and a copy sent to the 
family. ? . ..... ■ ., - : ! 

MRS. M. B. COODWIN, . 
MRS! J. E. AVENT, 

Committee. 
Morganton, 'N. C, Jan. 4, 1909. 



Harper. — Sarah E. Harper was born 
May 5, 1871, and died January 1, 1909, 
aged 37 years, 7 months and 7 days. 

She was first married when 19 years 
of age to Andrew Childress. She was 
married a second time to E. A. Har- 
per. 

Each marriage was blest with two 
children, and these, together with hus- 
band, mother, brothers and sisters re- 
main to mourn her loss. She has been 
a consistent member of the M. E. 
Church, South, from girlhood. She 
loved the church, but because of af- 
. iction was unable to attend its ser- 
vices as she desired. 

We trust that her hungry soul is 
now "where congregations ne'er break 
up and Sabbaths never end." 

. J. T. RATLEDGE. 



Yates.— William Addison Yates was 
born April 4, 1853, and died January 
14,' 1909, aged 55 years, 9 months and 
10 days. 

He was married to Mrs. Nancy Clod- 
felter in- the. year 1877. This mar- 
riage was blessed with two children— 
a daughter, who; with the mother, still 
survives; and a son, who preceded the 
father to the spirit land twenty-nine 
years ago. 

Thirty years ago Brother Yates pro- 
fessed faith in Christ and joined the 
M. E. Church, South, in which he re- 
mained a faithful member until trans- 
lated to the triumphant church in 
heaven. 

His was a quiet, calm and gentle 
Christian life, and applicable to him 
is Prov. 18:24: "A man that hath 
friends must show himself friendly." 

May his beloved companion and 
daughter strive to meet him in the 
blessed beyond, where partings are no 
more. J. T. RATLEDGE. 



Mary V. hitman. — Infant daughter of 
J. R. and Martha Whitman, was born 
October 19, 190.6, died January 1, 1909, 
aged 2 years,, 3 months and 12 days.. 
She was a bright little girl, possessing 
unusual gifts for a child of her age. 
Jesus, who said': "Suffer the little chil- 
dren to coie unto me and forbid them 
not, for of such is the Kingdom of 
BENSON— GAL FIVE— 
God," has seen fit to call her home to 
dwell with him in heaven. 
"I take these little lambs, said he,- ■ 

And lay them on my breast. 
Protection they shall find in me — 

In me be ever blest. 
Death may the bands of life unloose, 

But can't dissolve my life;. ■ ' 
Millions of infant souls compose 

The family above." 

J. R. RATLEDGE. 



CHARLOTTE DISTRICT.— 2d Round. 

H. K. Boyer, P. E., Cnarlotto, N. C. 

Dtlworth and Big Sripug Jan. 

North Charlotte .:. 

Brevard Street " 

Unlonville, Grace chapel Feb. 

Monroe, Central " 7- 

Lilesville, Shiloh " 13- 

Polkton, Hep. well " 20- 

Mt.rven. Union " 27- 

Prospect, Carniel Mar. 

North Monroe and Icemorlee, 

Center " 7- 

Ansonville, Cedar Hill " 13- 

Wadesboro ... " 14- 

Weddington, Weddington " 20- 

Waxhaw, Bonds Grove " .27- 

Pineville, Harrison April 3- 

Calvary " 4- 

Derita, Hickory Grove " 10- 

Tryon Street 

Mount Zlon * " 25- 

Trinlty May 

Chadwick " 2- 

Matthews " 15- 



Doub. — James M. Doub was born 
August 26, 1837, - and -died Janu- 
ary 10, 1909, aged 71 years, 4 months 
and 14 days. 

He was married May 17, 1866, to 
Pernelie E. Long. This happy union 
was blessed with the birth of four 
children — three daughters and one son. 

Only two of these survive, who, to- 
gether with the mother and eighteen 
grand children, mourn the loss of 
their loved one. 

Bother Doub joined the Methodist 
Church at the age of fourteen and re- 
mained a staunch, true Methodist and 
Christian until his death. 

He was a man of quietness and un- 



Death of Mr. Charlie Sherrill. 

', Mr: Gharlie Sherrill, son of Mrs. 
Nancy Sherrill, of Sherrill's Ford, and 
brother of pur townsman, Mr. Lee 
Sherrill, died in Dr. Long's sanitorium 
Wednesday morning following an op- 
eration for appendicitis. Mr. Sher- 
rill had been complaining for several 
days, flhd Sunday he was taken to the 
saintarium and the operation perform- 
ed, Monday. Mr. Lee Sherrill was with 
him. Tuesday, and left thinking he was 
getting along 'nicely, but Wednesday 
morning he received a 'phone message 
from the doctors in charge saying 
there was no hope. Mr. Lee Sherrill 
and Mr. George Moose left at once for 
Statesville, and shortly after their 
arrival the end came. 
; The body was brought up Wednes- 
day afternoon on train No. 21 and 
taken to Mt.. Pleasant, where it was 
interred yesterday. A number of the 
friends of the deceased young man at- 
tended the burial from here. — Catawba 
County News. 

Quarterly SXCeetings. 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT. — 1st Round. 

D. Atkins, P. E., Asheville, N. C. 

Swannnnoa. Swannanoa Jan. 2-3 

Rurnsville, Burnsville " 9-10 

Hpndprsonv'p ct., Moore's G've, " 16-17 

H^nrlprsonvine " 17 

Oontral. " 24 

North Ashoville " 24 

"Palrviow, Twppds *..... " 30-31 

Marshall. Mar-shall Feb. S-7 

H<»» Sfwlr. r «,."TTnt Springs.-. . " 13-14 

The district- stewards will- mp»t tn Oen- 

tral church. Asheville, December 16th. 
at 11 a. m. 



FRANKLIN DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

R. M. Taylor, P. E., Franklin. N. C. 

Webster. Webster Jan. 2-3 

Hayesville, Oak Forest " 30-31 

Hiawassee circuit, Ranger.. ..Feb. 6-7 

Murphy station " 7-8 

Whittier, Whittier... " 13-14 



GREENSBORO DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

W. R. Ware, P. E., Greensboro, N. C. 

Liberty, Liberty Jan. 3-4 

Asheboro ct. , Cedar Falls, Jan. 30-31 

Asheboro station Jan. 31-Feb 1 

Randolph, Trinity " 6-7 

Wentworth, Salem " 13-14 

Reidsville " 14-15 

Uwharrie, Concord " 20-21 

Denton, Denton.. " 22 

Ruttin, Lowe's , Feb. 14-15 

Randleman and Naomi " 27-28 

MT. AIRY DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 
W. M. Bagby, P. E., Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Rural Hall, Trinity.. Jan. 2-3 

Creston, Big Laurel " 30-31 

Boone, Fairview Feb. 3-4 

Watauga, Valle Crucls , 6-7 

Wilkes ct., Union " 10-11 

Second Round, in part 

Wilkesboro Feb. 14-15 

N. Wilkesboro " 14-15 

Yadkinville at Booneville " 17-18 

Jonesville, Ebenezer . . . ' " 20-21 

Elkin " 21-22 

Rockford, Siloam " 24-25 

East Bend, Prospect " 2i-28 

Rural Hall, Germanton Mai'. 3-4 

Danbury, Davis Chapel ... ... " 6-7 

Pilot Mountain at Chestnut Grove " lu-11 

Mt. Airy circuit at Salem " 13-14 

Mt. Airy " 14-15 



STATESVILLE DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

J. N. Huggins, P. E., Statesville, N. C. 

Stony Point, Marvin Jan. 2-3 

Catawba " 30-31 

Hickory ct., West Hickory Feb. 6-7 

Hickory station " 7-8 

Newton " 13-14 

WAYNESV I LLE DISTRICT— 2d Round. 

W. H. Willis, Presiding Elder. 

Waynesville Feb. 20-21 

Clyde, Clarks " 27-28 

Canton March 6-7 

Jonathan, Shady Grove " 13-14 

Mills River, Shaw's Creek " 20.21 

Bethel, Liberty " 27-28 

Leicester April 3-4 

North Haywood, Laurel Hill... " 10-11 

Spring Creek, Balm Grove " 17-18 

Sulphur Springs, i^ak Hill " 24-25 

West Asheville " 24-25 

Haywood May 1-2 

Brevard Circuit " 8-9 

Brevard Station " 15-16 

WINSTON DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

T. F. Marr, P. E., Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Farmington, i armington . . . ...Jan. 2-3 

Lewisville, Concord " 30-31 

iiavidson, Good Hope Feb. 6-7 

Davie, Hardison " 13-14 

Mocksville t ■ " 14-15 

Cooleemee " 14 

The district stewards will meet In the 
pastor's study of Centenary church, 
Winston, N. C, Tuesday, December 29, 
at 11:30 a. m. 

To Cure Ring Worms and Skin Diseases. 

Varnville, S. C, July 17, 1908. 
Mr. J. T. Shuptrine, Savannah, Ga. 

Dear Sir: — My wife uses your Tetterine 
for Ringworm, also uses it in her family 
for all kind of skin diseases, and she 
thinks it a good medicine. There is no 
substitute. Respectfully, 

L. R. Dowling. 

Tetterine cures Eczema, Tetter, Ring 
Worm, Ground Itch, Infant's Sore Head, 
Pimples, Boils, Rough Scaly Patches on 
the Face, Old Itching Sores, Dandruff, 
Cankered Scalp, Bunions, Corns, Chil- 
blains and every form of Skin Disease. 
Tetterine 50c; Tetterine Soap 25c. Your 
druggist, or by mail from the manufac- 
turer, The Shuptrine Co., Savannah, Ga. 

"To feel much for others and little 
for ourselves; to restrain our selfish 
and to indulge our benevolent affec- 
tions, constitute the perfection of hu- 
man nature." — Adam Smith. 



MORGANTON DISTRICT— 2d Round. 

R. M. Hoyle, Presiding Elder, 

N. Catawba, Green Mountain. .Feb. 20-21 

McDowell, Glenwood . .. " 27-28 

Rutherford College, at night.. March 5-7 

Connelly Springs, Friendships.. " 6-7 

Marion, at night " 12-14 

Old Fort, at Providence " 13-14 

Rutherfordton, GilbOa " 18 

Forest City, Pleasant Grove " 19 

Henrietta and Caroleen, at night " 19-21 

Cliffside, -Hollis " 20-21 

Green River, Bethlehem " 24-25 

Broad River, Union " 27-28 

Thermal City, Pleasant Grove. April 3-4 

Elk Park, Cranberry 10-11 

Bakersvill'e, Bakersville " 14-15 

Spruce Pine " 17-18 

Hartland " 22 

Mo.ganton Station, at night.... " 23-25 

Table Rock " 24-25 

Morganton Circuit May 1-2 

District Conference at Glenalpine April 
29th to May 2d. 




SHELBY DISTRICT.— 1st Round. 

C. F. Sherrill. P. E., Shelby. N. C. 
Lincolnton circuit. High Shoals, Jan. 2-3 

South Fork, Ebenezer " 30-31 

Lnwesville, Hill s Chapel Feb. 6-7 

Mt. Holly " 7-8 

Polkville, Rehobeth . " 13-14 

Belwood. Palm Tree " 20-21 

Second Round, in Part 

El Bethel, Salem Feb. 27-28 

Shelby ... " 28-29 

Cherryville, St. Paul's Mar. 0-7 

Crouse, Pleasant Grove " 7-8 

Gastonia, Main St " 13-14 

Gastonia, Ozark " 13-14 

Lincoln circuit, McKendree ... " 20-21 

Lincolnton station " 19-21 

King's Mountain " - 27-28 

Shelby circuit, Earl April 3-4 

Dallas, " 4-5 

Lowell, South Point " 10-11 

McAdenville ... " 10-11 

Bessemer City " 17-18 

West End and Franklin Ave.. " 17-18 

SALISBURY DISTRICT— 2d Round. 

J. C. Rowe, Presiding Elder. 

Spencer Jan. 31 

E. Spencer, N. Main : ~ " 31 

Epworth Feb. 7-8 

West Concord, Kerr Street .... " 7 

Forest Hill " 6-7 

Woodleaf, Cleveland " 13-14 

Holmes MemoKal " 14-15 

Albemarle Circuit " 20-21 

West Albemarle " 21 

Albemarle " 21-22 

Salisbury Circuit, Providence.. " 27-28 

First Church . , " 28 

Linwood, Ebenezer March -6-7 

Lexington . " 7-8 

China Grove, Landis ". 13-14 

South Main " 14-15 

Mt. Pleasant, St. Paul " 20-21 

Bethel " 21-22 

Corncord Circuit, Center " 27-28 

Central . .- : " 28-29 

Salem April 2 

Cottonville, Rehobeth " 3-4 

Norwood " 4-5 

G-ld Hill Weslev .": *' 10-11 

New LonJon. Palmerville " 17-18 

Jackson. Hill. Macedonia " 24-25 

Kanrapolis. Unity Mav 1-2 

Big Lick, Loves " 8-9 



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NOftTTT CAROLINA CrTrUKtTAN ADVOCATE. 



is. 




ie Cross means simply that you 

to go the road which you see to 
the straight one; carrying What- 
you find is given you to carry, 
/ell and stoutly as you can; with- 

making faces or calling people 
ome and look at you. Above all, 

are neither to load or unload 
self; nor cut your cross to your 

liking. — John Ruskinl 



lelp us to reach out past the 
?s we cairns! understand to the 
we trusti^iWe thank Thee for 
passing of what changes and the 
gelessness' of that which passes 
— Maltie Davenport Babcock. 



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ose who suffer from catarrh 
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-sver write for * the. sake ,of cover- 
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say nothing," ""This was the advice 
iv dearly " Ixiioyed mother, and 1 
it down>ttSvyon.t.— Abby Hopper 
ons. • tt..*. 1 "Je-£ i *.> -;• 



Ivery Christian ought to know the 
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saved America holds the key to 
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: ' 

Pen-Points Tfiat Prick. 
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sets quickly. 



Before you decide to buy we invite you to examine this work in 
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The illustration of the books given here does not do them justice; 
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has been made possible only on ac- 
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MAIL THE 
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1ft 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 4, I'M. 



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N. ii. — Following schedule figures pub- 
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ORGAN OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE OF THE M. E. CHURCH, SOUTH. 


IS1.50 PER ANNUM— 
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ESTABLISHED 1855. 


GREENSBORO, N. C, FEBRUARY 11, 1909. 


VOL. L1V.--NO. 6. 





ABRAHAM LINCOLN ON TEMPERANCE 



From an Address Before the Washingtonian Temperance Society of Springfield, 111. 



HEN THE CONDUCT OF MEN IS DESIGNED 

Wto be influenced, persuasion, kind, unassuming per- 
suasion, should ever be adopted. It is an' old and 
a true maxim, "that a drop of honey catches more 
flies than a gallon of gall." So with men. If you 

' would win a man to your cause, first convince him 

that you are his sincere friend. Therein is a drop 
of honey that catches his heart, which, say what he will, is the 
great high road to his reason, and which, when once gained, you 
will find but little trouble in convincing his judgment of the 
justice of your cause, if indeed that cause really be a just one. 
On the contrary, assume to dictate to his judgment, or to com- 
mand his action, or to mark him as one to be shunned and de- 
spised, and he will retreat within himself, close all the avenues 
to his head and his heart; and though your case be naked truth 
itself, transformed to the heaviest lance, harder than steel, and 
sharper than steel can be made, and though you throw it with 
more Herculean force and precision, you shall be no more able 
to pierce him than to penetrate the hard shell of a tortoise with 
a rye straw. 

On this point, the Washingtonians greatly excel the temper- 
ance advocates of former times. Those whom they desire to con- 
vince and persuade, are their old friends and companions. They 
know they are- not demons nor even the worst of men. They 
know that generally they are kind, generous and .charitable, even 
beyond the example of their more staid and sober neighbors. 
They are practical philanthropists; and they glow with a gener- 
ous and brotherly zeal, that mere theorizers are incapable of feel- 
ing. Benevolence and charity possess their hearts entirely; and 
out of the abundance of their hearts, their tongues give utter- 
ance, "Love through all their actions run, and all their words 
are mild." In this spirit they speak and act, and in the same 
they are heard and regarded. And when such is the temper of 
the advocate, and such of the audience, no good cause can be un- 
successful. 

, By the Washingtonians, this system of consigning the habitual 
drunkard to hopeless ruin is repudiated. They adopt a more en- 
larged philanthropy. They go for present as well as for future 
good. They labor for all now living as well as hereafter to live. 
They teach hope to all — despair to none. As applying to their 
cause, they deny the doctrine of unpardonable sin. As in Chris- 
tianity it is taught, so in this they teach, that 

"While the lamp holds out to burn 

The vilest sinner may return." 
And, what is matter of the most profound gratulation, they, by 
experiment upon experiment, and example upon example, prove 
the maxim to be no less true in the one case than in the other. 
On every hand we behold those who, but yesterday, were the 
chief of sinners, now the chief apostles of the cause. Drunken 
devils are cast out by ones, by sevens, and by legions ; and their 
unfortunate victims, like the poor possessed, who was redeemed 
from his long and lonely wanderings in the tombs, are publish- 
ing to the ends of the earth, how great things have been done 
for them. 

In my judgment, such of us as have never fallen victims have 
been spared more from the absence of appetite, than from any 
mental or moral superiority over those who have. Indeed, I 
believe if we take habitual drunkards as a class, their heads and 



their hearts will bear an advantageous comparison with those 
of any other class. There seems ever to have been a proneness 
in the brilliant and warm-blooded to fall into this vice. The 
demon of intemperance ever seems to have delighted in sucking 
the blood of genius and of generosity. What one of us but can 
call to mind some dear relative, more promising in youth than 
all his fellows, who has fallen a sacrifice to his rapacity? He 
ever seems to have gone forth, like the Egyptian angel of death, 
commissioned to slay, if not the first, the fairest born of every 
family. Shall he now be arrested in his desolating career? In 
that arrest, all can give aid that will; and who shall be excused 
that can and will not? Far around as human breath has ever 
blown, he keeps our fathers, our brothers, our sons, and our 
friends, prostrate in the chains of moral death. To all the liv- 
ing everywhere, we cry, "Come, sound the moral resurrection 
trump, that these may rise and stand up an exceeding great 
army" — "Come from the four winds, 0 breath! and breathe 
upon these slain, that they may live." 

If the relative grandeur of revolutions shall be estimated by 
the great amount of human misery they alleviate, and the small 
amount they inflict, then, indeed, will this be the grandest the 
world shall ever have seen. Of our political revolution of '76 
we are all justly proud. It has given us a degree of political 
freedom, far exceeding that of any other of the nations of the 
earth. In it the world has found a solution of the long mooted 
problem as to the capability of man to govern himself. In it 
was the germ which has vegetated, and still is to grow and 
expand into the universal liberty of mankind. 

But with all these glorious results, past, present, and to come, 
it has its evils, too. It breathed forth famine, swam in blood, 
and rode on fire ; and long, long after, the orphan 's cry and the 
widow's wail continued to break the sad silence that ensued. 
These were the price, the inevitable price, paid for the blessings 
it bought. 

Turn, now, to the temperance revolution, in it we shall find 
a stronger bondage broken, a viler slavery manumitted, a great- 
er tyrant deposed. In it more of want supplied, more disease 
healed, more sorrow assuaged. By it no orphans starving, no 
widows weeping. By it none wounded in feeling, none injured 
in interest. Even the dram-maker, and dram-seller, will have 
glided into other occupations so gradually as never to have felt 
the shock of change, and will stand ready to join all others in 
the universal song of gladness. 

And what a noble ally this, to the cause of political freedom ! 
With such an aid, its march can not fail to on and on, till ev- 
ery son of earth shall drink in rich fruition, the sorrow-quench- 
ing draughts of perfect liberty. Happy day, when all appe- 
tites controlled, all passions subdued, all matter subjected, mind 
all conquering mind shall live and move the monarch of the 
world. Glorious consummation ! Hail fall of Fury ! Keign 
of Reason, all hail! 

And when the victory shall be complete — when there shall be 
neither a slave or a drunkard on the earth — how proud the title 
of that Land, which may truly claim to be the birthplace and 
the cradle of both those revolutions, that shall have ended in 
that victory. How nobly distinguished that people who shall 
have planted, and nurtured to maturity, both the political and 
moral freedom of their species. — Methodist Recorder. 



2 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 11, 1909. 



North Carolina Christian Advocate 



Entered according to the Postal Laws and Regula- 
tions in the Post Office In Greensboro, N. C, as 
mail matter of the second class. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 

One Year $1.50 

Six Months 76 

To all preachers of the Gospel at $1.00 a year. 

Office: 110 East Gaston Street, Greensboro, N. C. 

This paper will be continued to subscribers at 
the expiration of the time paid for unless the office 
is notified to the contrary. Watch your label, and 
unless you intend to pay for the paper, do not allow 
it to be delivered to you over the time. If you wish 
your paper discontinued, notify us by postal card. 



EDITORIAL. 



It is significant that the United States govern- 
ment has increased her expense for naval arma- 
ment two hundred times during a period in which 
our population has increased only twenty-two 
times. Is it not time for the country to take a 
rest on this costly outlay? Some one has well 
said that courtesy and good will are more power- 
ful than explosives in preventing war. 

There is little doing in the state legislature now 
In session at Raleigh, outsicle of passing on bills 
of a private nature. There has been nothing passed 
this time that materially affects laws already in 
force and this is well. The state needs a rest 
from agitation and we are in a fair way to have 
this. The railroads want the passenger rates 
raised again, but nothing is likely to be done. 

A suicidal mania seems to have possessed the 
country. Three or more in rather prominent cir- 
cles in our state in one week is disquieting to say 
the least. What is the matter? Are we becoming 
less reverant and less regardful of the sacredness 
of life? It is barely possible .that the command- 
ment which says "Thou shalt not kill," is too 
much of a neglected theme in our pulpits and in 
the press. It ought perhaps to be discussed more 
fully, especially as it applies to the taking of one's 
own life. The strain and stress of present-day 
business methods, along with the additional strain 
caused by the social demands of the day per- 
haps have something to do with bringing about 
such a dreadful state of things. The conscious 
power and inspiration of the Christian religion 
will do more than all things combined to stop the 
dreadful mania. 



LAYMEN'S MEETING IN WINSTON DISTRICT. 

The laymen of eight charges in the Winston 
district will hold a great rally at Walnut Cove, on 
March 25th-27th. The charges participating in 
this meeting are Madison, Spray, Stokesdale, 
Stoneville, Summerfield, Walkertown, Leaksville, 
and Walnut Cove. The meeting is being widely 
advertised, and a great time is expected. Promi- 
nent speakers, both laymen and preachers, are 
expected to be present. 



THE ANTI-SALOON LEAGUE. 

In another column we are printing an appeal for 
the Anti-Saloon League by Dr. S. B. Turrentine. 
We add a word here to say that there is urgent 
need that all the friends of the cause rally to the 
support of the League. They are constantly print- 
ing and circulating literature and keeping watch 
over the ground already won. Let us not forsake 
the organization while its work is just fairly be- 
gun. We say that the work is just fairly begun 
for the reason that the work or the League will 
be needed in the enforcement of the law quite as 
much as in securing the ratification of the act. 



OPENING AT SPRING GARDEN STREET. 

Last Sunday was a happy day for the congrega- 
tion at Spring Garden Street church. Rev. N. R. 
Richardson and his congregation were rejoicing 
in the first fruits of joyous reward coming to them 
as a result of their heroic struggle to build their 
beautiful house of worship. The auditorium has 
been completed, and was occupied for the first 
time on Sunday morning. 

The ministers present were Revs. N. R. Richard- 
son, A. D. Betts, D. D., and H. M. Blair. There 
was no sermon, but after the usual opening service 
with beautiful and appropriate music by the choir, 
the pastor announced a program of short address- 



es by the heads of the various departments of the 
church. The board of trustees and the building 
committee were represented by Mr. Gaston W. 
Ward. In a very appropriate paper he gave the 
history of the church from the beginning, and es- 
pecially the history of their building enterprise. 

The Sunday school was represented by Mr. E. 
L. Sides, superintendent, who made an earnest 
appeal in behalf of enlargement and progress. 

The Epworth League was represented by Mr. 
L. F. Hanes in an appeal for the development of 
leadership among the young people and the im- 
provement of church music. 

Mr. W. B. Hunt spoke in behalf of the board of 
stewards and Miss Bertha Lee spoke of the Wo- 
man's Missionary Society and its work. 

The whole program was unique and the large 
congregation present seemed deeply interested. 
The congregation will hereafter have all that could 
be desired in a house of worship, especially when 
they are able to complete the Sunday school an- 
nex, which has been deferred till they finish pay- 
ing for the auditorium. 

Rev. N. R. Richardson, the pastor, is to be con- 
gratulated on his very efficient management of 
this difficult enterprise. This church will no doubt 
in the near future be one of the strongest and 
most useful in the city. 



CORN CLUBS VS. BASEBALL CLUBS. 

The Statesville Landmark last week told of 
the visits of Superintendent White and C. R. Hud- 
son to various public schools in the county of Ire- 
dell for the purpose of organizing "Boy's Corn 
Clubs." These clubs are intended to stimulate 
the boys in the study of agriculture, getting up a 
sort of rivalry among them in the work of the 
farm. 

It has been a long time since we have seen any- 
thing so pleasing as this announcement. For some 
time we have been taking note of the increased 
tendency among country boys to form baseball 
clubs and to cultivate the manner of the city sport, 
but now, blessing's on the departments of educa- 
tion and agriculture, we shall hope to see thei'e 
baseball clubs put out of commission by these 
Boy's Corn Clubs. 

There is no reason why the boys in the country 
should seek physical development by resorting to 
baseball, and the game is known to be demoral- 
izing. How much better it will be for the boys to 
develop muscle weeding the corn than in wielding 
the bat. And then the rivalry in the contest for 
a prize yield of corn will furnish more enduring 
pleasure than any sport of the game. 

We trust that parents will everywhere co-oper- 
ate with the school authorities and the Agricul- 
tural Department and see that nothing be done 
to discourage the movement. Let the boys join 
the corn clubs, begin to study agriculture in ev- 
ery practical way and another generation will wit- 
ness a wondrous revolution in our agricultural 
methods, and all this will bring happiness and con- 
tentment into our homes. 



A REAL PROBLEM ON OUR HANDS. 

It is true that the enacting of a prohibition stat- 
ute has laid upon us the problem of enforcement, 
but this is not the only problem which comes to us 
as a result of the breaking up of the legal sale of 
liquor. A very clever man who has been engaged 
in the liquor business for a good portion of his life 
until, as he says, it is the only business he knows, 
put the editor to thinking a short while ago on a 
phase of the subject he had not considered very seri- 
ously before. This man said he was anxious to get 
away from the liquor business now, but that he did 
not know what to turn to. 

While any able-bodied man should be ashamed to 
acknowledge that he can not turn to other honest 
pursuits and make a living, yet it is all too true 
that many of them know nothing else and they de- 
serve the sympathy and help of all good people. 
It has come to pass that, as a result of closing up 
the saloons, we have on our hands more than ever 
before the problem of the unemployed. 

The editor of the Nashville Christian Advocate 
last week, referring to this, says: 

"One of our highly valued contributors has else- 
where in this issue a most suggestive article on 
'The Ex-Saloonkeeper.' The liquor traffic and the 
whisky interests are being rapidly broken up in the 
South, and saloon employes are being thrust but of 
their old places of service by which they have main- 
tained themselves and their families. They should 
have the most kindly consideration of the Chris- 
tian people who have rightly led the campaigns 
against the business in which they have been en- 



gaged. Saving men is as religious as saving souls, 
and is really the inclusive work." 

Perhaps few of our readers have ever 'thought of 
the great work incumbent upon every Christian man 
and woman in endeavoring to encourage these men 
to seek employment for a livelihood in other indus- 
tries and pursuits of life. Let there be no brow- 
beating of these men, but let there be kind and con- 
siderate effort made to lead them into other avoca- 
tions and into better and happier living. 



CO-OPERATIVE EFFORT. 

One object of our conference organization is 
the securing of co-operation. With this in view 
our Annual Conference adopts various resolutions, 
fixing days or months as definite times for con- 
centrating thought and effort upon one important 
line. There is no doubt great advantage in such 
co-operative effort, but it seems somehow that, as 
a body, we are prone to forget these resolutions 
and we often fail to co-operate. 

At our recent Annual Conference a resolution 
was adopted making the first Sunday in March 
Brevard School Day. With proper observance of 
this day in all our churches this very important 
and deserving institution will be supplied with 
funds needed for improvements and enlargements 
that are immediately demanded. Otherwise the 
whole matter must go by default, and our confer- 
ence resolution pledging support will go for noth- 
ing. 

This habit of saying and doing nothing has be- 
come entirely too common and we beg all our 
people to act with better conscience and see to it 
that an honest effort be made to make good our 
promises. 

Brevard School is eminently worthy of our sup- 
port. Here poor girls who have little opportunity 
to prepare for life are taken and trained at the 
bare cost of living, and there is not a Sunday 
school in all the land but would gladly respond 
with a contribution if the matter were clearly set 
before them. We sincerely trust that this year 
our pledges will be made good for Brevard, and 
that the first Sunday in March will witness one 
instance of all-round co-operation to this end. 



APPEAL FROM BISHOP ATKINS. 

To the Pastors: 

Dear Brethren:— You will probably recall that 
at the conference at Asheville the Board of Edu- 
cation, Ltii. to unable to make an appropriation for 
the Brevard Industrial School, recommended that 
the first Sunday in March should be set apart for 
the raising of funds for that school. The confer- 
ence adopted the recommendation, and it there- 
by became the order of the Annual Conference. 

I am writing to remind you of this action and 
to urge that every pastor, in the conference see 
to it that a collection is taken on that day. 

It will be well in taking the collection to remind 
your people of the unique character of this insti- 
tution. It takes girls of little means or no means, 
but with good abilities and good character, and 
prepares them intellectually and industrially for 
the places they are to fill in life. It has already 
done a really wonderful work in discovering and 
fitting girls for large usefulness who otherwise 
would have been bound in the shallows of ignor- 
ance and incompetence all their lives. It is the 
only school of this class that we are endeavor- 
ing to run in the state. It is, therefore, positively 
discreditable for us, eighty-six thousand strong, 
to allow the school to lack for anything necessary 
to its highest efficiency. 

The institution is under the control of the Wo- 
man's Home Mission Society, and they are doing 
nobly in the bestowment of funds for running ex- 
penses. But what the school now most needs is 
a certain and considerable amount of improve- 
ments in the house which are necessary to the 
health and comfort of the pupils. Without these 
repairs and improvements the school must be seri- 
ously damaged. The Home Mission Society has 
made no provision for this kind of outlay. It is 
enough that they have taken off our hands the 
whole burden of running the school. When the 
plant needs such repairs and enlargement as are 
now called for, it ought to be an easy matter for 
the pastors to procure the funds. 

I beg that not a single pastor shall forget or 
neglect this important call. I can scarcely con- 
ceive of a man who has the spirit of the gospel in 
him as being indifferent to an interest of such 
magnitude as this which is to engage us on the 
first Sunday in March. If you will make a clear 
statement of the case on the last Sunday in Feb- 
ruary and ask the people to bring the best offering 



February 11, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



3 



each is able to bring for this vital interest, the 
collection will be sufficient to meet the immediate 
and urgent needs of the school. 

Remit all moneys collected to Prof. C. H. Trow- 
bridge, Brevard, N. C. 

With love and with prayers for the divine bles- 
sing upon you and yours and upon all your work, 
I am, Cordially yours, 

JAMBS ATKINS. 



PRODDING THE BRETHREN. 

Rev. Dr. L. W. Moore, editor of the Florida 
Christian Advocate, uses a trenchant pen. He is 
bright and witty and always hits the mark 
straight. In last week's paper he prodded the 
pastors of his conference in the following sensible 
paragraph : 

"All this talk about the INABILITY of the 
church in certain conferences to support a church 
paper is the veriest nonsense. A town of ten 
thousand inhabitants can support a daily paper 
creditably; this ten thousand too counts in all 
the illiterates and the children who are too young 
to read. A conference of ten or twenty thousand 
able-bodied Methodists can support a weekly, if 
they will half try. They will try if the preachers 
push the circulation of the paper as the Disci- 
pline directs. 

"This is a patent proposition to us because of 
what the Florida Conference is doing at the pres- 
ent. Since our connection with the paper almost 
six months ago, we have heard but one note sound- 
ed on a minor key in this matter. A member of 
a certain charge sent in his subscription and 
wrote us that he was sure the paper could not suc- 
ceed if the pastors did not push its claims, ana 
that his pastor had spoken but one time on the 
subject of the church paper in his hearing, and 
had never tried to secure a subscriber so far as 
he knew. With this kind of support no paper 
could succeed, if it were the only one in uni- 
versal Methodism. That is the only preacher in 
the conference of whom we have heard such a 
report. We hope it will be the last and that he 
will repent and do better. 



NOTES AND PERSONALS. 



— Rev- Dr. B. F. Dixon, State Auditor, has been 
visiting his old home in Cleveland. 

— Rev. Walter Holcomb has recently held a very 
successful meeting at Cartersville, Mo. 

— Rev. Jno. W. Moore will conduct a series of 
special services at Rutherford College February 
15th-21st. 

— We are glad to learn that Mr. M. O. Sherrill, 
State Librarian, who has been ill for some time, 
is reported as much improvedT 

— Rev. C. H. Clyde, of the Walnut Cove charge, 
called on Tuesday morning, on his way to Raleigh 
for a look-in on our Legislature. 

— Rev. John W. Nicholson, a prominent mem- 
ber of the Virginia Conference, died at his home 
in Pungoteague, on the eastern shore, on Friday 
of last week. 

— Revs. J. Ed. Thompson and O. P. Ader, of High 
Point, were in the city on Monday and called to 
see us. They report everything moving pleasant- 
ly in their city. 

— Rev. E. C. Glenn reports a good meeting in 
Richmond, Va., last week. This week he is en- 
gaged in a meeting at Wright Memorial church, 
Portsmouth, Va. 

— South Main Street church, High Point, has 
just put in a new organ and is preparing to 
make improvements in the infant room and in 
the Baraca class room. 

— We deeply sympathize with Brother A. M. 
Smith, of Elkin, in the death of his brother, Mr. 
John G. Smith, who died at Fort Smith, Ark., on 
January 24th. 

— Rev. J. H. Brendall, our pastor at Pilot Moun- 
tain, reports a good revival in his church at that 
place. He has been holding services only at night. 
Congregations are large and several conversions. 

—Rev. M. T. Plyler, of the North Carolina Con- 
ference, called last week. He was returning from 
a visit to his father in Iredell county, who has 
been quite sick. Brother Plyler is now stationed 
in Washington, N. C. 

— We regret to learn of the serious illness of 
the little son of Rev. T. B. Johnson, of Stony 
Point. The little *boy has been critically ill of pneu- 
monia but it is thought that he has passed the cris- 
is and will recover soon. 

— Mrs. Williams, wife of Rev. C. C. Williams, 
of Elkin, died at their home in that place on Thurs- 
day of last week. She was the daughter of Mr. 



A. A. Tucker, of Surry county, whose death we 
noted in these columns last week. May the great 
Comforter be with the bereaved ones. 

— It is reported that of the sixteen business 
houses formerly occupied by saloons in Salisbury 
only six are yet vacant. These no doubt will 
soon be occupied and Salisbury will start on a 
great era of solid, enduring prosperity. 

— Rev. J. W. Long spent Tuesday in Raleigh, 
where he went to attend a meeting of the execu- 
tive committee of the State Sunday School Asso- 
ciation, which met to discuss arrangements and 
program of the convention to be held in Concord 
in April. — Concord Times. 

— We sympathize with Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Mann 
in the serious illness of their second daughter, a 
bright girl of about twelve years, who has been 
confined to her bed for the past ten days, and 
sincerely trust that she will soon be restored to 
perfect health. — Webster's Weekly. 

— Dr. W. K. Hartsell, who for fifteen years has 
been practicing his profession of dentistry at Ran- 
dleman, has removed to Greensboro and opened an 
office for practice in this city. We are glad to wel- 
come the doctor to our city, and trust he may find 
this change to his advantage every way. 

— The remains of Mr. Earl Scarboro, whose 
death we mentioned last week, reached Greens- 
boro on last Friday morning and the funeral was 
held on Friday afternoon from West Market St. 
church, conducted by the pastor, assisted by Revs. 
J. C. Rowe, of Salisbury, and J. A. B. Fry, of 
Berkeley, Cali. 

— The Salisbury correspondent of the Charlotte 
Observer says: "Rev. S. B. Turrentine announces 
that Wednesday night of this week a mass meet- 
ing of the First Methodist congregation will be 
held. There will be short talks by persons repre- 
senting the different departments of church work 
and the program closes with a social feature in 
the Sunday school annex. It is proposed to have 
four of these mass meetings during the year." 

— Rev. J. A. B. Fry, of the Pacific Conference, 
now stationed at Berkeley, has been spending a 
few days among relatives and friends in the state. 
He came all the way across the continent last 
week to accompany the remains of young Mr. 
Scarboro, whose death in that state we mentioned 
last week. It was a great pleasure to greet Brother 
Fry in our office on Monday afternoon. He will 
start on the long journey back in a few days. 

— Rev. W. M. Curtis, Secretary and Treasurer 
of Greensboro Female College, reports that he 
needs now only $15,000 of having in hand the 
amount necessary to be entitled to the Carnegie 
gift of $25,000. This balance of $15,000 is in the 
form of subscriptions on the part of various per- 
sons who should respond at once either with cash 
or negotiable paper so as to enable him to close up 
the whole matter. It is exceedingly important 
that each one concerned give this matter immed- 
iate attention. 

— The Concord Times, of the 4th, says: "Last 
evening as Mr. K. L. Craven was on his way home 
from his coal yard, driving a young mule to one of 
his wagons a shaft broke and the mule started to 
run away. Mr. Craven was thrown out violently 
to the ground, his head striking the hard macad- 
am. He was knocked senseless, and did not re- 
cover consciousness until some time after he was 
removed to his home. It was at first thought that 
his injuries were serious, but it was found that 
his skull was not fractured, and no bones broken. 
He is now resting as well as could be expected." 



A WORD TO THE PEOPLE OF MORGANTO.-J 
DISTRICT. 

Brother Terrell, of the Brazil Mission Confer- 
ence is coming to see us. He will be in this dis- 
trict from February 22d to the 28th. Let all our 
people who can meet and hear him. He is ex- 
pected at 

Caroleen, at night Feb. 22 

Forest City, at night " 23 

Rutherfordton, at night " 24 

Marion, at night " 25 

Morganton, at night " 26 

Connelley Springs, at 11 a. m " 28 

Rutherford College, at night " 28 

R. M. HOYLE, 
Morganton, N. C. 



Rev. J. M. Terrell in Shelby District. 

Lowesville, 3 p. m Feb. 15 

Mt. Holly, at night " 15 

Stanly Creek, 11 a. m " 16 

Lincolnton, at night " 16 

Crouse, " 17 



Cherryville, at night " 17 

Shelby " 18 

El Bethel, 11 a. m " 19 

Kings Mountain, at night " 19 

Lowell " 20 

McAdenville, at night " 20 

Bessemer City " 21 

Gastonia, Main Street, at night " 21 



Brother Terrell is fresh from the mission field, 
and will have great things to tell. I hope large 
congregations can greet him. 

C. F. SHERRILL. 



CAMPAIGN FOR NEW SUBSCRIBERS. 



Report to February 9th, 1909. 

ASHEVILLE DISTRICT. 

Riverside, A. E. Harrison ' 1 

Weaverville, T. E. Smiley 6 

7 

CHARLOTTE DISTRICT. 

Dilworth, A. L. Coburn 1 

Wadesboro, J. H. West 1 

Tryon Street, G. H. Detwiler 2 

Trinity, E. L. Bain 9 

Belmont Park, L. A. Falls 2 

Monroe, H. F. Chreitzberg 2 

Chadwick, J. P. Hipps 2 

North Charlotte, W. O. Goode 8 

27 

GREENSBORO DISTRICT. 

Coleridge, R. L. Fruit 3 

Pleasant Garden, R. A. Taylor 1 

Washington Street, J. Ed. Thompson . . 2 

South Main Street, O. P. Ader 3 

9 

MORGANTON DISTRICT. 

Cliffside, S. E. Richardson 2 

Rutherford College, W. E. Poovey 3y 2 

5% 

SALISBURY DISTRICT. 

Albemarle Circuit, J. T. Stover 1 

First Church, S. B. Turrentine 1 

Woodleaf, E. G. Pusey 7 

Jackson Hill, E. M. Avett 5 

Linwood circuit, W. C. Willson 1 

Salem station, G. A. Stamper 8 

23 

SHELBY DISTRICT. 

Cherryville Circuit, A. C. Swofford 1*4 

1% 

STATESVILLE DISTRICT. 

Lenoir Circuit, J. O. Erwin 13 

Rock Spring, W. F. Elliott 1 

Hickory, Phoenecia Britten 1 

15 

WINSTON DISTRICT. 

Summerfield Circuit, C. P. Goode 1 

Walnut Cove, C. H. Clyde 11 

7 12 

WAYNES VILLE DISTRICT. 

Waynesville, J. H. Barnhardt 1 

Jonathan Circuit, J. B. Hyder 11 

Sulphur Springs, J. W. Campell 12 

Bethel, C. A. Swift 9 

West Asheville, R. E. Atkinson 1 

Leicester circuit, C. H. Curtis 13 

47 

MT. AIRY DISTRICT. 

Rockford Circuit, T. J. Houck 13 

13 

Grand total 160 



It will be seen from the report that our cam- 
paign is just fairly opening. Let everybody watch 
the Waynesville district, now in the lead. The 
force in the office can track the presiding elder 
from week to week by the reports. Brother Wil- 
lis has made up his mind that it shall be done 
and it is doing. There are some others right along 
behind him. There are now about 1,600 who were 
on our list last April but are not on it now. Let 
the brethren go after these and re-capture them. 
Following is our 

Roll of Honor. 

J. O. Ervin, T. J. Houck, J. W. Campbell, C.H. 
Curtis. 



FROM ASCENSION TO PENTECOST. 

Rev. A. D. Belts. 

Jtsus was in the grave three days. He then 
showed himself to his friends forty days. That 
left them seven days to wait. 

In the "Quiet Hour" (January 5th Dr. Chappell 
says: "The baptism of the Holy Spirit was pre- 
ceded by a prayer meeting that lasted ten days." 
To my mind it was just one week of prayer. 

Greensboro, N. C. 



i 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 11, 1909. 



Contributions. 



THE CRITICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF COLLOS- 
SIANS. 

Rev. I). .1. Miller. 

Paul's letter to the Collossians is one of the 
greatest arguments on record against agnosticism, 
or, under its modern name, "The New Theology." 
Collossae was a city dominated by Grecian 
thought, and the very first idea which the human 
mind comes in possession of, was, in the Greek 
mind, sceptically conceived. He thought of him- 
self as a product of the earth, an evolution from 
the earth, behind which no intelligent hand, of the 
Almighty, is seen. 

When this idea was more fully developed, it was 
known as gnosticism. In modern thought it is 
known as "The New Theology." The gospel which 
was preached in Collossae by Epaphras fell into 
soil which was pregnant with this kind of thought, 
hence, this church tended in this direction. 

After the brotherly greetings and words of com- 
fort, Paul proceeds to set forth his subject (vs. 
15, 16). "Who is the image of the invisible God; 
the first born of all creation, for in him were all 
things created." 

If one will give attention to the history and 
thought of the Greeks, this subject becomes clear, 
and so does the argument which follows. If we 
keep this Greek idea of life in view, how clear 
does the last part of verse 18, chapter 1, become 
"That in all things he might have the pre-emi- 
nence." Then passing on through the argument 
with this idea of life before us, how clear do the 
first and second verses of chapter 3 become; Paul 
has shown that Christ is the creator of all things, 
verse 16, chapter 1, as contrary to their Greek 
idea of it. Now he tells them to set their minds 
on things above, where Christ is, not on this 
earthly, Greek idea of things. 

Because of the arguments in this epistle against 
gnosticism, Hilgenfeld thought he saw traces of 
its origin, by another than Paul; but it is clear 
to an impartial mind that Paul's words and sym- 
bols would be different, when battling with gnos- 
ticism, to what they would be when battling with 
Judaism. Hilgenfeld objected that in chapter 3 
verse 11, the putting of the Greek before the Jew 
is not Pauline. It is clear from the context that 
Paul referred more to the Greek's love of vain 
philosophy than he did to the Greek as a man, or 
a nation. This is the very thing he was strik- 
ing at, and Paul did not allow any race prejudice 
or anything else to come in his way. He took 
such words as were suited to convey his thought, 
and hurled them with the force of an intellectual 
giant. 

This is proven by what follows. He next puts 
the circumcision first because he refers to the 
love of circumcision rather than to the man or to 
the nation. Men cannot lose their lives in such 
notions, and yet have on the new man, is the idea 
which Paul sets forth. 

Instead of these words, which are out of Paul's 
common way of putting them, invalidating the 
authenticity of this book, they, when understood 
in connection with their historical background, 
strengthen the argument. 

Now let any one fix Paul's subject in mind, and 
keep in view the tendency of those men towhom he 
was writing and read the book of Collossians. There 
appears a force of argument and depth of thought 
second to none; besides a symmetry of style and 
choice of words hardly paralelled in the Greek lan- 
guage of Paul's day. When we thus read the book 
of Collossians the great thought which stands out, 
as it does in all nature, is, first life and 
then things, first intelligence, then plan. Now, 
let any critic, or any other man disprove this. It 
is a thousand times easier for any mind to think 
of life producing matter and form, than it is to 
think of matter producing life, when it has no 
life. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Lydia Briscoe Leonard Caviness was born in 
Chatham county, N. C, March 25th, 1870, and died 
at McAdenville December 22d, 1908, aged 38 years, 
9 months and 27 days. She was the daughter of 
Alexander Wilkie and Carrie Leonard, and the 
wife of Rev. C. H. Caviness, a member of the 
Western North Carolina Conference of the M. E. 
Church, South. 

Our information is that she was always a bright 
cheerful, good girl. She made a public profession 



of religion in her youth, and connected herself 
with the Christian Church, this being the church 
of her parents. Upon her marriage to Brother 
Caviness in 1895, she promptly and prudently be- 
came a member of the church of her husband, 
and became honestly and thoroughly identified 
therewith. In fact, she became an enthusiastic 
Methodist, and was very jealous for its character 
and prosperity. She lived a consistent Christian 
life, in all its relations. Her devotion to her hus- 
band, and her interest in his work and his suc- 
cess as a preacher, were beautiful to behold. Her 
ambition for his largest success was very high, 
and no sacrifice was too great for her to make 
that she was not glad to make to promote that 
end. Like Saul and Jonathan, Brother- Caviness 
and his wife "were lovely and pleasant in their 
lives, and in her death they were not divided." 

Sister Caviness was not only a true helpmeet 
to her husband, but a truly fond and affectionate 
mother. She was in passionate love with her chil- 
dren, doing everything in her power for their high- 
est good. She had no sympathy with the modern 
idea that strict discipline was incompatible with 
the purest affection. She controlled her children 
with a firm, but gentle hand. And in return, her 
children were fond of her, and will doubtless rise 
up in the years to come to bless her memory. 

The principles which controlled her through life 
did not fail when, after a short illness, she came 
to die. She died as a Christian ought to be ex- 
pected to die, intelligent, thoughtful, patient, 
cheerful, happy. Her physician testified that in 
a long practice, he had never seen a patient so 
considerate, thoughtful and careful. 

Of my own knowledge, Sister Caviness was a 
thoughtful, kind neighbor, and I doubt not this 
is such testimony as all will bear who have had 
the good fortune to live next door to her. 

She left a deeply afflicted husband and four chil- 
dren, together with an extensive family relation- 
ship, to mourn their loss, and all we can do is to 
commend them to the tender mercies of Him 
whom she so faithfully served and loved. 

While she lived, she did "what she could," and 
now she hath entered upon that reward promised 
to all the faithful. Her body sleeps with her fa- 
ther's, awaiting a resurrection to a glorious im- 
mortality when the great day of the Lord shall 
come. 

We tender to the whole family our profoundest 
and purest sympathies in their bereavement of so 
good a child, sister, wife, and mother. It is your 
sad lot now to weep, but her good fortune to re- 
joice. 

FRANK H. WOOD. 



THE PULPIT'S SILENCE ON PURITY. 

There must be a reason why the ministry is si- 
lent on the subject of impurity; and the reason I 
believe to be ignorance, not that of entire ignor- 
ance, not that the minister does not know, for he 
is a man before he is a minister; but I believe 
that most ministers are ignorant of the scope of 
the general subject. There is a reason for that 
ignorance, too, becauseonly in the very recent 
past has there been any really good literature that 
has given the statistics and presented them in a 
way that the minister would be appealed to by 
the presentation of facts. So that his ignorance 
is to be excused, if I dare plead his ignorance on 
the subject — that he does not think it is half as 
bad as it is. But even after they have been ful- 
ly informed, there still is a reticence; there is a 
silence about it all, that I attribute to cowardice, 
to fear. They do not know how to present it even 
if they knew the facts in the case; and if they 
knew how to present it, they would be fearful that 
there might be a great disturbance in the congre- 
gation on the subject. The man who is afraid to 
speak on any particular subject in the pulpit 
shows that he has not realized the first functions 
of his ministry, which functions are, as a mighty 
warrior, , to' attack the foe when he sees him, and 
not to run away from him. 

I fear that the difficulty is not that the minister 
is ignorant, nor yet that he is afraid, but that he 
does not know how to handle the whole subject. 
Listen! Why should a minister or a school teach- 
er or a mother, or anybody, for that matter, be 
afraid to offend or to create a false sentiment in 
the minds of the children, when every boy and 
girl who has gone to a public school has seen what 
has been chalked or scribbled or scrawled on the 
walls, and the information has already gotten to 
them. I am not afraid to talk to a boy or a girl; 
I don't worry about the fact that maybe they don't 
know anything about this subject. The trouble is 



they know too much already, and know it wrong- 
ly. And here, with all due respect to those who 
counsel waiting and training teachers to teach 
these things, I would be in favor of beginning to- 
day or tomorrow, in the schools or anywhere, and 
then train the normal school teachers. If we do 
make mistakes now, with all of our inability and 
inefficiency, we cannot make it much worse than 
it is without any instruction. 

And right here the pulpit fails — because I, for 
one, believe that the pulpit is the most powerful 
moulder of public opinion in the country today 
on subjects of morality and ethics, as well as of 
religion; and I believe that because it has that 
power, if it knew the awful evil that was sapping 
the life force out of humanity, it would go on its 
knees before God and ask God, who has promised 
to give wisdom to every one who lacketh — just ask 
God how to handle a subject that is so delicate. 
Then if he does not know whether he ought to 
do it promiscuously at a general church gathering, 
I would suggest that you ask him to call a meet- 
ing of the men. He will be surprised at the num- 
ber of men who will come; and just to talk to 
them frankly — not as a minister to men, but as a 
man to men. He will get a mighty wave of en- 
couragement from them; and they, too, though 
they may not say it, will think it in their hearts, 
"We are mighty glad our dominie has at last 
come to say something on the subject." Ministers 
ought to be, generally speaking, cultured men, and 
ought not to make any very great blunder in the 
matter. Only let us awaken them to the enormity 
of impurity, and then call the men together and 
the women together, and if they are fearful and 
timid (as undoubtedly they will be) then ask them 
to invite some woman physician to talk to the wo- 
men. Let the minister get his boys around him, 
and let the minister's wife, or some woman physi- 
cian, get Ihe girls around her. 

I have one other word to say, that the whole 
subject be dealt with not as impurity, but as pur- 
ity. That, after all, is the secret of the whole mat- 
ter. We are using a phrase now in ministerial 
Christian work, called "personal work," in which 
we are not content Just to preach to the congre- 
gation, but to get down and reach each one; and 
that personal work is considered by those who 
never did it as an exceedingly difficult thing — 
that men will feel that they ought to repulse you 
if you go and ask them about their relationship to 
God; that it is none of your business. It took me 
quite a little while to get into the habit of talking 
personal religion, and I have talked to several 
thousand men since I have been a pastor in Phila- 
delphia, about their personal relationship to Je- 
sus Chrsit. I have never once been repulsed. I 
have talked to men and women about the subject 
of purity, and have never yet been told by word or 
look to turn the subject. It is the way in which 
it is done, and anyone can speak about it, if he 
does it intelligently. 

The minister in the pulpit with the subject of 
impurity needs to discuss it from the standpoint 
of Jesus — not just gloss it over; not just ignore it; 
but in the due course of his ministry, in the regu- 
lar order of his preaching, to bring that subject 
up just as he would any other, because purity 
of the individual and purity of the home lie at 
the basis of all right society and of the church. 
And if the minister is silent in the pulpit on the 
subject of purity, he may be one of those who is 
helping by his silence to spread the whole matter 
of impurity. 

My final word is, that you stand by the minister. 
I believe that God will give all of us grace enough 
to handle this subject rightly and with pure mo- 
tive and pure mind, if we desire so to do — not only 
to advance purity, but to advance the Kingdom of 
our Lord Jesus Christ. — Rev. A. Pohlman, M. D., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE LAYMEN'S MISSIONARY MOVEMENT. 

On the 15th day of November, 1906, there was 
held at the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, 
New York, a meeting that will go down as nota- 
ble in the religious history of this country, as 
worthy to rank with the Student Volunteer Move- 
ment, that had its rise in Mount Hermon, Mass., 
in 1886, and, indeed, with the Haystack Prayer 
Meeting held in Williams College, a hundred years 
ago. In that meeting in New York two years 
ago, after an afternoon and evening of earnest 
prayer and conference, a number of laymen, rep- 
resenting the various protestant denominations in 
this country, decided that the world might be 
evangelized in a single generation, and then they 
deliberately resolved that it should be done. A 



February 11, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



5 



hundred years before, Mills, a preacher, in the 
Haystack Prayer Meeting had said: "The world 
can be evangelized if we will." Now these lay- 
men say: "The world can be evangelized, and we 
will." In this meeting in New York they organ- 
ized a strong central committee composed of men 
from the various denominations, because they be- 
lieved that in a matter as momentous as the evan- 
gelization of the world there should be no distinc- 
tion of denomination, and then they sent forth 
their representatives, strong laymen, that should 
go up and down in this country, rallying and or- 
ganizing the men of the church with reference to 
the accomplishment of this greatest of all pur- 
poses in the kingdom, the evangelization of the 
world, preaching the gospel to every creature of 
earth in the next thirty-five years. This is the 
origin of the Laymen's Missionary Movement, and 
the movement has for its object the enlistment of 
the men of the church, of all churches, through 
their praying and going and giving in the great 
work of ' saving the world. 

A Providential Movement. 
Now the women have been interested all along, 
as they have had such special cause to be; the 
little children in their Juvenile Missionary Socie- 
ties have done much,, and men, as individuals, of 
course, have led in the great movement for the 
world's salvation; but as a class men have been 
absorbed with other things, and either in con- 
siderable numbers or in any other large way it 
cannot be said till now that men have been 
very greatly concerned with the world's evangeli- 
zation. 

But the time was evidently ripe, the providen- 
tial hour had struck, and the rally call in the 
churches has been instantly answered by an in- 
terest and enthusiasm that at the inception of the 
movement, I suppose, its most sanguine leaders 
had hardly dared expect. It is too early to say 
with certainty of course, what it will mean. But 
unless the signs dreadfully fail, this movement 
among men in its power as a really epoch-making 
force and its influence upon the progress of the 
kingdom of God in the earth will "take its rank 
nmong the three or four greatest movements that 
have arisen in Christian history. 

A Great Blessing to the Layman Himsei.. 

It will mean much for the layman himself. The 
effect of a great movement like this is immedi- 
ately felt in its reflex influence upon the church. 
Of the Laymen's Movement, I believe this will 
be eminently true. In these times there is in the 
church a certain earthly-mindedness, a serious 
worldliness, if you please, found in the business 
man's absorption with the interests and engage- 
ments of his business life that is a heavier draft 
upon the spiritual life of the church, if possible, 
than those excesses and frivolities of social life 
that are commonly called worldliness. Your 
business man will come to church once on Sun- 
day, go through the service in a listless and often 
perfunctory way, go home, and after that he is 
not seen in a prayer meeting during the week, 
and cannot be gotten, as a rule, to turn his hand 
to any definite work for the church, and thinks 
it ample excuse to say that he has not the time. 
There are notable exceptions, but this is the rule. 
Only a great interest, such as enthusiasm for the 
world's salvation will ever lift him above that 
low plane. This new and larger vision will bene- 
fit him scarcely less than the heathen he be- 
comes interested to reach and save. 
Lifting Some of the Burden From the Preacher's 
Shoulders. 

It will help the work of the church by taking 
from the preacher's shoulders some of the unfair 
burden that he has hitherto borne. At the meet- 
ing at Chattanooga a memorial was adopted pray- 
ing the General Conference "so to change the 
existing lav/ in some appropriate way that the 
laymen in a charge, under the supervision of the 
pastor shall have intrusted to them the collection 
of the conference claims and assessments, a ser- 
vice if placed in our hands we will accept as a 
loving service for our church and a s'acred duty 
which we owe to our God." That memorial, so 
graciously worded, should be granted by the Gen- 
eral Conference; and if it is, the pastor through 
this service of the laymen, no longer serving 
tables, will be relieved of well nigh the heaviest 
burden upon his free and larger pastoral activities. 
If this should come about, some pastors would 
feel that the milennium was already upon us. 
The Business Man's Method in the World's Sal- 
vation. 

The laymen's new interest will mean a more 
definite and practical plan for saving the world. 



Heretofore in our work for the world's evangeliza- 
tion we have toiled too often as one that beateth 
the air, leaving the conduct of our plans largely 
to our women and little children and an occa- 
sional inspiration or special providence that has 
swept down from the skies and intervened to save 
our operations from disaster and financial bank- 
ruptcy. But your layman has no sooner taken 
hold of the enterprise in his own right than, as is 
his business habit, he goes about dividing up the 
world systematically into sections for assignment 
to the various denominations, and then figures 
out how many men and how much money it will 
take to do it. 

Our Share of the Enterprise. 
They assign forty million of the heathen peo- 
ple of the world to our branch of the church, and 
this we divide up at once between Cuba, Mexico, 
Brazil, Korea, Japan, and China, deciding that 
our missionary force should be increased from 
two hundred and fifty-two, the present number in 
the field, to sixteen hundred, the number required 
to reach our forty million in the next generation, 
and that we must raise our offering from less 
than fifty cents per member, to two dollars per 
member. 

In the very definiteness of the planning there 
is a promise of effectiveness that the kingdom has 
not seen before and that with the practical char- 
acter of present methods of missionary work is 
due to the business habit of the laymen who come 
in now to take control in this mighty enterprise. 
The Business Man's Enterprise Will Mean Much 
Larger Things. 

The work will go forward upon a much larger 
scale. That we have been giving just one penny 
a week for the evangelization of the world is due 
partly to the fact that this layman, this man who 
holds the purse, has never gotten his heart en- 
tirely right, but partially also to the fact that he 
has been too busy to face fairly the tremendous 
significance of his failure to do more than that. 
He is beginning to face that fact, and his new 
vision will mean new and greatly enlarged en- 
deavor. Five hundred million heathen have not 
heard of Christ because there is nobody to tell 
them, there is nobody to tell them because there 
is nobody to send, and there is nobody to send 
because this man who holds the purse, with all 
his luxuries and resources, with all his protesta- 
tion of loyalty to Christ and interest in the 
progress of the kingdom, this layman refuses' tr < 
pay as much on the average as a single car fare 
every seven days! If he loves his Lord, as he 
does, he will not "stand for that." 

I believe we are on the fringe of an era of 
generosity, of royal giving to the cause of Mis- 
sions such as the church has scarcely dreamed. I 
know one layman in one of our churches in the 
conference who last year gave sixteen hundred 
dollars for missions; another remarked to me 
casually that he expected to support a missionary 
next year. At the Southern Baptist Convention 
a year ago a timid layman arose and said: "Mr. 
Moderator, I can't make a speech; but if you will 
send ten missionaries to China, Brother Willing- 
ham may send the bill to me." Dr. Goucher tells 
of a man who gave ten thousand dollars a year for 
ten years, and as the result of that single expendi- 
ture fifty thousand heathen were converted to 
Christianity, making men Christians at a money 
cost of two dollars per head. Mr. Ellis, of the 
Philadelphia Press, that splendid young layman, 
told me that he had good reason for saying that 
Mr. Rockefeller in the next few months would 
do for missions what would fairly startle the 
world. 

If we can get our laymen to see it, many of 
them have money and many of them love God 
and souls, and I believe that in the next few 
years instead of the complaints so frequently 
made against the assessments laid by the district 
stewards upon the churches, through the increased 
the royal giving of our wealthy and well-to-do lay- 
men, the assessment will be left behind in the dis- 
tance, and, I trust, lost sight of forever in a lib- 
erality that requires no compulsion but the in- 
spiration of its own larger vision. 

The Plan of Organization. 

The organization is a simple one, and looks in 
its very simplicity and effectiveness as if it must 
have been an inspiration. Not much machinery. 
A lay leader — that is about all. A lay leader 
for the conference, one for the district, one for the 
church, and a committee for each congregation. 
That is easily understood and easily worked; and 
with a literature supplied from the various head- 
quarters, and the help and suggestions that our 



conference and district lay leaders are ready to 
give at every turn, either the plan exactly as pro- 
vided or slightly modified and adapted can be em- 
ployed in every community. 

Wanted — A Man. 

Of course you will need here a man as else- 
where. The finest machine will not go without 
power, and you may have the most perfect plan 
of organization and it will not move without a 
man to make it. I had rather have one good 
live man in a congregation than all the organiza- 
tions and plans that you could pile on; and given 
the man, he will probably find the plan. And yet 
we must not confine our work to finding a man or 
two here and there. We must seek to get the 
rank and file of our membership interested and 
enlisted — an organization and an occasional 
meeting, a special meeting for rallying effect or 
maybe a committee working the whole congrega- 
tion and especially personal work of the hand- 
to-hand character, but by every legitimate means 
bringing the lay heart into touch with the warmth 
and energy of this mighty movement for the 
bringing of this world to Christ. 

We Must Trust Him and Take the Risk. 

I believe I ought to say especially that we must 
trust our new laymen. The preacher is some- 
times a little suspicious of this new emphasis 
upon the layman's work and a little fearful if 
left to himself he may not do it. He need not 
be left to himself. His work is the work of the 
pastor still; and if the preacher sees an inch above 
the level of his own little nose, lie will get behind 
and push with all his might, because he under- 
stands that when this layman comes to his provi- 
dential place nobody will benefit more by his larg- 
er and skilled service than the preacher himself. 
If we expect him to tax himself with the collec- 
tion, we must put the burden on him and let him 
know we are counting on him. He is not ac- 
customed to directing religious meetings and mak- 
ing speeches. If he does not do it as easily and 
glibly at first, we must not think that he is not 
therefore doing it even more effectually than the 
preacher can. Let us trust, help, open wide the 
way for him, and I believe that we shall see in this 
new movement, new hope for the heathen world 
upon which the movement moves and by the 
very rebound new life no less in the church out 
of which it springs. — Rev. E. H. Rawlings, in Balti- 
more Southern Methodist. 



IN RUINS. 

This form Of thine so lately warm with life, 
So bright with hope,-, and sweet with smile and 
speech, 

Lies here in ruins now. But 'twas yo£. r home 
Where, through its windows, you have seen tfe*ss_ 
earth, 

In fairest guise, nature in tenderest mood. 

Music has charmed you through its vibrant chords. 

And tuneful avenues. So many things 

Have given you joy in this old domicile! 

But now the doors are shut and thou art gone! 

As time goes by, perchance a loving friend 
Will plant about your grave the fresh green things 
That you have loved so well — ferns and the 
sweet, 

Shy violets and lilies pure and fair. And it 
Were well if some old oak should cast its veil 
Of shade above the spot. Then when the twilight 
Falls, and soft winds stir its thousand leaves, 
Some true and gentle soul may come — some one 
Who, looking through the bars of mortal flesh, 
That during life, had bound your spirit in. 
And finding there something akin to theirs, 
Had loved you to the last — this friend may come 
And lay a wet cheek on the sod and say: 
"In life you did me good. You cheered my heart. 
Because of you rough paths were easier trod, 
Dark places brighter grew, wrong looked more 
vile, 

And right more beautiful. You took my hand 
And bravely helped me on the upward way — 
The, heavenly way. I loved you then, and now 
Your memory is dear — it lights me still. 
Till we shall meet again, dear friend, farewell!" 

"Till we shall meet again!" Oh thought ineffable! 

Faith looks away beyond this waiting time — 

Afar it may be, or it may be near — 

When thou, at God's command, shalt live 

Forevermore within a spiritual house, 

New, undefiled and incorruptible 

That Christ shall raise for you, from out 

The ruins of this frail abode, to which 

Your friends have given tender sepulture. 

— L. A. E. S. 



6 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 11, 1909. 



From The Field. 



Jackson Hill. 

We came to Jackson Hill, Dec. 2d, 
and were received royally by this 
large-hearted people. We found a 
bountiful supper in waiting and a 
number of the brethren and sisters 
on hand to give us a welcome. The 
preacher that forgets such kindness 
would be guilty of criminal careless- 
ness. 

I am glad to say .that our churches 
are alive, and are interested in church 
work. May the Holy Spirit use us 
mightily in preaching the word to this 
kind people. Fraternally, 

E. M. AVETT. 



Glenville Circuit. 

The work is still encouraging here. 
The congregations are comparatively 
large, and receive the word very ap- 
preciatively. We are hopeful, and 
are expecting to see Glenville circuit 
pay out, especially the pastor's sal- 
ary. We will hold our children's ser- 
vices as soon as the weather gets 
warm enough for the children to at- 
tend church. 

Our plan is to preach at least one 
sermon during the year to the chil- 
dren from five to fifteen years of age, 
choosing a simple text on the mission 
of Jesus. 

ROBT. L. ANDREWS. 



Wilkes Circuit. 

We are moving along very well on 
the Wilkes circuit. We have been 
able to meet all of the appointments 
so far, and are having fairly good 
congregations for the winter. The 
stewards raised the assessment for 
pastor's salary $70.00, higher than 
last year. We have secured in cash 
and subscriptions more than eighty 
per cent, of the conference collections 
and will secure the remainder as rap- 
idly as we well can. We are expect- 
ing a better all round year than we 
had last. We are praying for a gra- 
cious revival all over the work. "We 
want to see many souls saved during 
the year. We" have held no special 
meeting yet, but want to hold some 
before a great while. Pray for our 
success. 

W. L. DAWSON. 



New London. 

A kiud reception was accorded us 
on our coming to take charge of the 
work at New London. This is a good 
people to labor among; evidences of 
their appreciation and brotherliness 
are of constant occurrence. I am 
working and praying that the charge 
may move forward in every good way, 
and especially that Jesus Christ may 
be known personally to each man to 
whom I must preach. 

New London High School, under 
the management of Prof. J. D. Ran- 
kin and Prof. A. M. Norton, is meet- 
ing with great success. The enroll- 
ment for the present term is 143, 62 
more than were»enrolled during the 
fall term. These men are thorough- 
ly consecrated to their work and their 
efforts are meeting with a large meas- 
ure of success. 

OTHO J. JONES. 



Lenoir Circuit. 

It gives me much pleasure to state 
that by God's grace Brother D. H. Co- 
mann's Bible preaching, supplement- 
ed by the prayers of pastor and our 
good people, we are now at the close 
of a very gracious meeting of ten 
days, during which God's people have 
been edified and built up in the most 
holy faith of the gospel, and about 
sixty have professed faith in Christ, 
with about 30 accessions to the 



church at present, others yet to re- 
ceive. 

Brother Comann believes in feeling 
in religion, but he believes in the Bi- 
ble more, and may we all say amen, 
"Now ye are clean through the word 
which I have spoken unto you." 

May God add his blessing to the 
Advocate staff and readers. 

Yours, 

J. O. ERVIN. 



Annual Meeting of the Board of 

Church Extension. 

The annual meeting of the Board of 
Church Extension will be held in 
Memphis, Tenn., April 29-May 2. . 

The meeting of the Conference 
Board Representatives, which was 
provided for at the last annual meet- 
ing of the General Board, will be held 
in the same city on April 27-28. En- 
tertainment for the members of the 
board and for the Conference Board 
Representatives will be provided by 
the Methodists of Memphis. 

W. F. MCMTJRRY, 
Corresponding Secretary. 



there is in the conference. It will 
be a seven room house built on the 
modern plan. Most of our people are 
responding to the parsonage enter- 
prise. 

We hope to occupy it by the middle 
or last of March, clear of debt. The 
board of stewards made the salary 
same as last year, with some increase 
on conference collections, but we ex- 
pect to pay out in full as usual. 

I have made two full rounds on the 
work, and have found appreciative 
congregations at all the churches. I 
think there are great possibilities here 
and our people are growing, both in 
grace and liberality. We hope to be 
helpful to these good people by min- 
istering to them in spiritual things 
and we are praying for a general re- 
vival in every congregation. I hope 
to send a good number of new sub- 
scribers and renewals in a few days 
Success to the Advocate and all of 
its readers. 

Fraternally, 
J. J. EDWARDS, P. C. 



USE OUR 
STANDARD 
S and 6 PLY 



Conference Church Extension Board 
Notice. 

As chairman of the Western North 
Carolina Conference board of church 
extension, I hereby call a meeting of 
its executive committee to meet in 
Mooresville, N. C, on Monday, March 
3d, at 12 o'clock, in the the church, to 
transact such business as may come 
under the jurisdiction of said board. 
All applications to the parent board 
and conference board should be sent 
to the secretary on or before the 
above date in proper legal form. 

JOHN D. LINEBERGER, 
Chairman. 



To the Pastors of the Western N. C. 
Conference. 

At onr last conference we adopted 
2, 'strong, timely report on temperance 
which included the following: "We 
belive that the Anti-Saloon League 
should still be maintained as a fight- 
ing force to hold the ground already 
won, and that one day should be set 
apart in our churches for the expres- 
sion of our cordial sympathy, and for 
the contribution of financial support 
of this organization." I am officially 
informed that funds are needed now 
to carry on the important work of the 
Anti-Saloon League. I believe the 
time to aid a worthy cause is when 
such help is urgently needed. Let us 
give this matter our attention by 
promptly taking collections and send- 
ing funds to Rev. R. L. Davis, Super- 
intendent Anti-Saloon League, Wilson, 
N. C. 

S. B. TURRENTINE. 

Salisbury, N. C. 



Troutman Circuit. 

Perhaps a few lines from Truotman 
circuit would not be out of place. 

We arrived here on December 3d, 
and were kindly received by a goodly 
number of ladies of the town who 
had renovated the parsonage where 
a good warm dinner awaited the new 
preacher and family. While we have 
not been stormed with a big pounding 
at once, we have received many to- 
kens of appreciation in a substantial 
way, for which we feel very grateful 
to the donors. Truly we feel that 
our lot has fallen in a pleasant place. 

Since our coming here, we have 
sold the old parsonage and are build- 
ing a new one near the church. If 
the weather continues favorable will 
get it enclosed in a few days, as the 
frame is up, and when complete will 
be as good a circuit parsonage as 



Centenary Philathea. 

One of the special features in con- 
nection with the Sunday school at 
Centenary M. E. Church, South, on 
last Sunday morning, was the organ- 
ization of a Philathea class. This 
class has been talked of for quite a 
while and by the kindly assistance of 
Misses May Hinshaw and Anna Cof- 
fin, of West Market Street church, 
the first Philathea class of Centenary 
church was organized with seven 
members. 

The officers are as follows: Vallie 
Sanders, president; Sallie Embrey, 
vice-president; Bertha Jones, secre- 
tary; Sallie Love, treasurer; Emma 
Elliott, press reporter; Mrs. T. A. 
Glasccfck, Vallie Sanders, Virgie 
Townsend, constitution committee. 

The teacher, Mr. J. F. Aiken, and 
each of the members extend a very 
cordial invitation to all young ladies 
and older ones too, who will join this 
class and help to make it one of the 
largest and best classes in the city. 

EMMA ELLIOTT. 



Going One Better. 

In the issue of January 21st inst, 
is an article from Rev. R. E. Atkin- 
son, pastor of Balm Grove station, in 
which he says, "The Sunday school is 
a very live wire," then produces the 
records to show that ten students had 
been present fifty-two Sundays, six 
present fifty-one and five present fifty 
Sundays during the year 1908, then 
closes by saying, "Who's second." 

Now, if Brother Atkinson had been 
familiar with the scripture found in 
St. Luke's gospel, fourteenth chapter, 
eighth and nieth verses, he would not 
have used the words, "Now, .who's 
second?" 

Oak Hill Sunday school, in Sulphur 
Springs circuit, Waynesville district, 
is in a mountain district sparsely set- 
tled, and in near proximity of two oth- 
er Sunday schools, while Brother At- 
kinson's is in West Asheville in the 
suburbs of the city, in easy access of 
five hundred, yet we can surpass his 
figures. 

We had fifteen students and teach- 
ers present fifty-two Sunday, two fifty- 
one and four fifty Sundays. We have 
one hundred and two enrolled, aver- 
age during the year, 8610-13; about 
85 per cent. 

We have thirty old and married peo- 
ple, nearly thirty per cent. There are 
some that have almost reached three 
score years and ten; one of that num- 
ber being present fifty-one Sundays, 
during the year, one Sunday was too 
sick to get there. 

Every family in the entire commun- 
ity was represented in the school. One 
teacher, a rather delicate girl, walked 



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two miles, and often through the mud 
to be with her class, and was present 
forty-eight Sundays. 

We have been organized only a few 
years, yet we have one boy, Denny 
Starnes. started in his sixth year 
without missing a Sunday. 

A. H. STARNES, 
Superintendent. 



A Convenient Device. 

Rev. H. H. Smith, of Ashland, Va., 
has invented a handy device which 
every preacher needs for filing his 
clippings. It is called the Preacher's 
Filing Case, and is arranged so as to 
classify such clippings as a preacher 
may wish to retain in subjects. Be- 
sides 26 pockets covering the alpha- 
bet, there are 67 pockets indexed ac- 
cording to the following topics: 

Affliction, Amusements, Assurance, 
Atonement, Bible, Confession, Con- 
science, Consecration, Conversion, 
Conviction, Character, Children, 
Christ, Death, Duty, Education, Ex- 
cuses, Experience, Faith, Forgiveness, 
Funerals, General (here file all mate- 
rial not easily classified-, Giving, God, 
Grace, Habit, Hell, Heaven, Home, 
Honesty, Hope, Holy Spirit, Humility, 
Hypocrisy, Immorality, Influence, Joy, 
Judgment, Love, Money, Missions, 
Obedience, Obstacles - Opportunity, 
Peace, Prayer, Probation, Procrastina- 
tion, Profanity, Providence, Regenera- 
tion, Repentance, Resurrection, Rev- 
erence, Revival, Reward, Sabbath, 
Sacrifice, Sanctification, Sin, Sunday 
School, Sympathy, Temperance, 
Temptation, Tobacco (injurious ef- 
ects of the cigarette, etc.), Trust, 
Thanksgiving, Work. 

There is a separte pocket for each 
of the above copies. If you have a 
Filing Case, whenever you come 
across an illustration on these sub- 
jects you place it in the proper poc- 
ket and you can always find it when 
needed. 

The device costs $2.75, postpaid, 
and any of our preachers will do well 
to correspond with Brother Smith. 

Address, 

REV. H. H. SMITH, 

Ashland, Va. 



Miss Bennett and Miss Head Visit 
Brevard. 

From January 22d to 26th, it was 
our privilege and pleasure to have in 
our midst Miss Belle Bennett, presi- 
dent of the Board of the Woman's 
Home Mission Society, also Miss Ma- 
bel Head, field secretary of the soci- 
ety was with her. They came to visit 
the school and expressed themselves 
as being much pleased with the qual- 
ity of school work they found being 
done, but were grieved to find such 
inadequate equipment for carrying on 
the work, and the painful lack of such 
necessities as bed furnishings, ware, 
etc. 

On Sunday our pastor, Rev. R. G, 



February 11, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



7 



Tuttle, tendered the use of his pul- 
pit to these ladies and one Sunday a. 
m., Miss Bennett spoke forcefully of 
the work and used John 4, 35, as a 
base for her remarks. She told of 
the origin of the W. H. M. Society, 
then known as "the parsonage aid so- 
ciety," and spoke of its early strug- 
gles to help build homes and to sup- 
ply some of the temporal needs of the 
faithful itinerant in a faraway hard 
place, whose garb consisted mainly of 
his righteousness, and proverbial 
"Methodist faith." But gradually the 
people have learned more of the 
work, and have entered into it more 
fully and have given some co-opera- 
tion and a little of their means (but 
ignorance of the work is yet the be- 
setting hindrance) until now about 
7,000 women are banded together and 
we have several schools, a rescue 
home, a home for friendless girls, 
schools on the coast of Florida and 
California for 'foreigners, and lastly 
homes on the Gulf coast to receive 
immigrants as they land and give 
them food and shelter until they find 
employment. She spoke also of the 
foreign work and reminded us that: 
"These ought ye to have done, and 
not leave the other undone." 

Her plain statement of facts won 
the audience from the first, and all 
listened with rapt attention and inter- 
est to the close. Miss Head spoke at 
the evening service and seemed to 
take the subject up where Miss Ben- 
nett had left off, and told of the piti- 
ful need of people in our own home- 
land — in Christian America. She 
spoke of the colonies of foreigners 
living in the mining districts of Ar- 
kansas who know nothing of God or 
civilization, and are living in unmo- 
lested heathenism, and their inter- 
preter stated that they are living in 
a more depraved condition here than 
they did in their home land, and he 
asked, 'Why don't you send mission- 
aries to us?" She based her remarks 
on "Lovest thou me, Peter," and in 
her appeal to the young people for 
trained workers she made this scrip- 
tural quotation her central thought. 
Both speakers are of interesting per- 
sonality, and the addresses made a 
profound impression. 

They have quickened our energy as 
a society to try to render more effici- 
ent service, and ladies who had never 
before become interested have now 
expressed their desire to become 
members, also five men have given 
their name and fee for honorary mem- 
bership. 

Yours in the work, 
MRS. B. T. EDGERTON, 
Secretary. 



were of the old order, by way of the 
mourner's bench. 

The meetings ran. through tbe holi- 
days, though for the first three or four 
weeks there was but little visible in- 
terest except a holy desperation on 
the part of few who prayed, preach- 
ed and hoped until God honored. An- 
other feature was that we held our- 
selves open for invitations to hold 
prayer-meetings in the business 
houses of the town in the afternoons. 
For two weeks we held fifteen minute 
prayermeetings at three o'clock -in 
stores, offices, blacksmith shops, mills 
factories and anywhere men labored. 
These were full of interest and ex- 
ceedingly productive. The work was 
slow, sure, and much will be abiding. 
As a result the town is altogether a 
different place. 

We are grateful to God and are con- 
vinced of one thing and that is, the 
revival will come if we hold on and 
consider not difficulties. One Sunday 
afternoon we preached to a house full 
of "men only" and had a service long 
to be remembered in this place on ac- 
count of the good accomplished, this 
being the opinion of all who were 
there without a dissenting voice. 

To God be all the praise. 

C. H. NEAL. 



The Revival at Sylva. 

We have just closed a most re- 
markable and successful protracted 
meeting at Sylva. The ' preaching 
was all done by the Baptist preacher 
and me, except a sermon or two. It 
was not regarded as a strictly union 
meeting, but rather one of united ef- 
fort on the part of the Methodists 
and Baptists. The meetings were 
held in the Methodist church and last- 
ed seven weeks. 

There were several remarkable 
things about the meeting. One being 
the length of it, as already indicated. 
Another was that very few women 
and children were converted, but 
most of the work was among men. 
There were nearly fifty conversions 
and reclamations, most of which were 
grown men. I call to mind now eigh- 
teen men who are heads of families 
that were saved, when all are in there 
will be about twenty additions on 
profession of faith and by letter to 
the Methodist church as an outcome 
of the meeting, and quite a number to 
the Baptist church. The conversions 



Some Interesting History. 

Dr. George H. Cox furnishes us the 
following which will be of interest not 
only to Capt. J. A. Ramsay's friends, 
but to Sunday school workers: 

An item in the Post, concerning 
Capt. John A. Ramsay's connection 
with the State Sunday School Associ- 
ation, brings to mind the following 
fact: 

The second International Sunday 
School Convention was held in Atlan- 
ta, Ga., April 17-19, 1878. At that 
convention there was prominently dis- 
played, a large map of the United 
States, upon which all states that 
were organized for Sunday school 
work were marked by a gold star, 
while those states that were not or- 
ganized were designated by a black 
cloud covering the state. 

North Carolina, not being then or- 
ganized, was thus draped in black. 

There were present at that meeting 
fifteen Sunday school workers from 
North Carolina, as follows: John A. 
Cheatham, Rev. N. R. Cobb, W. C. 
Doub, Gen. Robert D. Johnson, A. M. 
McPherters, W. R. Odell, Esq., Rev. 
T. H. Pritchard, D. D., Capt. John A. 
Ramsay, John E. Ray, Rev. J. J. Renn, 
Dr. F. Scarr, Dr. T. C. Smith, Baker 
White, Samuel C. White, and Charles 
G. Yates. 

These men were very mortified that 
their state should be so represented 
and sought for a plan by which the 
black cloud might be removed. After 
consulting with the officers of the con- 
vention and other leading workers 
who were present, ten of the fifteen 
North Carolinians held a meeting In 
the First Baptist Church of Atlanta, 
at 9 a. m., April 18th, 1878, and or- 
ganized the North Carolina State Sun- 
day School Association, by electing 
Rev. Dr. T. H. Pritchard as president; 
Prof. John E. Ray, as secretary, and 
Rev. J. J. Renn, as treasurer. 

The association was then enthusias- 
tically received and enrolled in the 
convention, and a gold star was 
placed upon the above mentioned map 
in place of the black cloud. 

This information I had from Capt. 
Ramsay and John E. Ray, principal 
of the State School for the Deaf and 
Blind, at Raleigh, both of whom were 
present and participated in the or- 
ganization. — Salisbury Evening Post. 



9r 



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HOW TO PLAN WISELY. 

Nn one ever originates wise plans 
for his worjt. God u^cs all the plan- 
ning; the best that we can do, ana 
all that we ever need to do, is to 
learn from God what his plans for us 
are. When, therefore, we are faced 
with the need of planning wisely, and 
perhaps ask others to pray for us 
that we may plan wisely and that 
our plans may be blessed, let us real- 
ize rather that it is simply a question 
of whether we are ready to listen to 
God. We do not need to be nearly 
so much concerned to pray for God's 
blessing on our plans as to pray that 
God will reveal to us his plans for 
us and give us the will and the wis- 
dom to carry them out. He will be 
sure to bless his own plans; if we 
them out our blessing is certain. 
"Show me thy plans for me" is a 
better prayer than "Bless my plans." 
— Sunday School Times. 



True eloquence I find to be none 
but the serious and hearty love of 
truth. — Ibid. 



MAKING THINGS RUN SMOOTHLY 

If there is one thing above all else 
that makes household labor run 
smoothly, it's oil. Not the oil that is 
poured on troubled waters, but the 
oil that's put on bearings to prevent 
friction; to make wheels turn easily; 
to prevent rust; to stop that screech- 
ing, grinding, creaking; to save wear 
and tear. 

There are plenty of oils on the mar- 
ket. Some are heavy, some are light. 
Some are good for one thing, some 
are good for another. But the ideal 
oil is the one that answers all prac- 
tical household purposes. "House- 
hold Lubricant" not only fills the bill 
in this particular, but it comes ready 
to use — in a handy can with a remov- 
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store you use it. No chasing around 



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the oil as in days of old. The House- 
hold Lubricant can with its reversi- 
b'e spout, which permits closing the 
can to prevent spilling and leaking 
if upset and the carefully compound- 
ed oil which it contains answers ev- 
ery condition demanded for the per- 
fect household lubricant. 

There is nothing that ordinarily 
gives more dissatisfaction in the 
handling than an oil can with its shal- 
low bottom and mussy, dripping spout. 
The Household Lubricant can elinii- 
nates all this. The can itself is of 
such a shape and size — even in the 
larger, 8 ounce size, that it is very 
easily handled and "stays put" when 
you put it down. So universally rec- 
ognized are the merits of this oil that 
it is found on sale in every little ham- 
let and village in the land. 



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8 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 11, 1909. 



The Christian Life. 



"HAVE FAITH IN GOD." 

When temptation sore assails you, 
And your courage almost fails you, 
When the storm clouds break about 
you, 

And when Satan tries to rout you, 
"Have faith in God." 

When the woes of life o'ertake you, 
And your trusted friends forsake you, 
Look above the turmoil 'round you, 
Think of Him whose love hath found 
you, 

And have faith in God. 

When your heart grows faint and 
weary, 

And your path seems bleak and 
dreary, 

When your life grows cold and cheer- 
less, 

Let your trust in Him be fearless, 
Have more faith in God. 

r 

He will never, never leave you, 
Though the sins of earth may grieve 
you, 

He will take you home to heaven, 
Where perfect love and trust are 
given, 

If you have faith in God. 

— Pearle King Stevens. 
Asheville, N. C. 



"REST A WHILE." 

To hundreds of thousands who la- 
bor and are weary, there is today 
sweet music in the Master's words, 
"Come ye yourselves apart into a 
desert place, and rest awhile." They 
must have been very welcome to the 
disciples to whom they were first 
spoken. They were very sad; they 
had but just returned from the fun- 
eral of John the Baptist, and the trial 
of their faith, with the sorrow of 
their hearts, had made them weary 
and hopeless. But if they had lost 
heart, Christ knew how to inspire 
them afresh; for there are two cer- 
tain cures for pessimism — out-of-door 
rest in quiet places, and the compan- 
ionship of Jesus. 

,MGst of us need these today quite 
as much as the disciples. Thoughts 
and events make us sorrowful, and 
to be really sorry for any length of 
time is to be tired. And, because we 
are not used to it, the heat makes us 
languid; so that work done often with 
joyous alacrity is dragged through, 
because the air is too laden with sun- 
shine. Therefore, these old words, 
thrilling with music, come in through 
factory walls and workshops, into of- 
fices and schools, and the people are 
glad because it is near holiday-time, 
and they may accept the invitation. 

In these days, however, a holiday 
does not always mean rest, particu- 
larly rest in "a desert place." Many 
people appear to prefer a crowd to 
quietness. But a throng is noisy and 
aggressive. We must look for rest- 
fulness less in favorite, fashionable 
seaside resorts than in the remote 
places of our land — the unregarded 
meadows, the distant moors, and the 
difficult mountains. There is rest to 
be found here. 

We may be sure that there is much 
suggestiveness of spiritual comfort- 
ing and uplifting in the Master's in- 
vitation, "Come apart," away from 
the others, from the clamor and the 
appeal, the urgency and exaction, "in- 
to a desert place," where there is no 
excitement, nothing to demand atten- 
tion, or to interfere with meditation. 
And is it not good of him to say, 
"Come with Me?" The consciousness 
of his nearness brings rest. There is 
no need even to pray. Friends who 
konw and trust and are sure of each 



other do not want to be always talk- 
ing when they are together. Silence 
is sometimes more expressive than 
words. It is more restful to say noth- 
ing than to speak. And when the 
Master gives us this experience, we 
do indeed find "rest to our souls." 

But we are not to let our leisure 
lengthen into laziness. "Kest a 
while," said Jesus; but he soon went 
to receive the crowd, and took his 
disciples that they might lead oth- 
er weary people to rest, and be fed. 
Host can only come to those who 
have striven, and it is but designed 
to make us ready to take up our tasks 
again, and diligently perform them. 
From the quiet of the lakeside and 
the silence of the field we can go 
back to our work among the whir of 
machines, or the clanging of metals 
or the clamor of voices, with a new 
love of our duty and a stronger desire 
to please the great Taskmaster. — 
Christian World. 



WE ARE BEST WHERE WE ARE. 

Sometimes we look at the circum- 
stances by which we are surrounded, 
and think how impossible it is for 
us to ever be, in the midst of such 
daily experiences, what we ought to 
be. We grumble over our lot instead 
of cheerfully accepting it at God's 
hands, believing that he knows what 
is best for us. We think regretfully 
that -if the people we are called up- 
on to meet from day to day were dif- 
ferent, if they had the same earnest 
aims and hopes as ourselves, if the 
worries arising from our work were 
less frequent and irritating, if we had 
not this sickly body or inherited 
weakness, we should be different 
from what we are. But it is not so. 
The psalmist was accurately right 
when he said, "Thy judgments are 
true and righteous." The judgment 
of God never errs. It can not fail. 
He does not plant the orchid on the 
Alpine height, for he knows the na- 
ture of each plant in the universe, 
and places it under the conditions 
best suited for its development. So 
likewise the personal requirements 
of each one of us is known unto him. 
We can, therefore, be certain that he 
has placed us just where our person- 
al character can fully unfold itself. 

Instead of bemoaning our difficul- 
ties, we ought to be thankful for 
them, for out of these trials is forged 
what we . call character. We know 
men in whose faces we can read it, 
and we know how it has been won. 
Whenever we see a face marked by 
an expression of strength and self- 
reliance, we conclude that it repre- 
sents a history in which there has 
been something to fight against, 
something to overcome. The influ- 
ences which have left their impress 
upon it have not been of the arm- 
chair and slipper kind. We know 
that many a victory was gained in 
the midst of rough experiences, for 
we can read the scars of battle in 
the lines upon the face. Yes, hard- 
ship, trial, difficulty, make character; 
or, to change the figure, they are the 
stepping stones upon which the soul 
rises. — The Pacific. 



WHAT YOU "CAN SAY." 

You "can say" your pleasantest 
words .at home, if only you try. 

You "can say" the exact truth 
about people, if you know it. (If you 
don't, don't say anything.) 

You "can say" a good word for a 
worthy person, if you make use of 
opportunities. 

You "can say" something to ease 
an aching heart, if you will. 

You "can say" something to influ- 
ence or help the erring, if you put 
yourself in their way. 

You "can say" a word of power to 
some unbeliever, if you have a "rea- 
son for the faith which is within 
you." 

You "can say" your prayers, if you 
bear in mind that God's protection 
is of more importance than any of 
earth's business. 

You "can say" what the Lord has 
done for you, if you trust him for 
strength. 

You "can say" a hearty "amen" to 
every prayer if you stop criticizing 
the human appeal to the Divine." 

In fact, you "can say" just what 
God has ordained for you to say, if 
you will consecrate your tongue to 
his service. — Selected. 



T. W. 0. 0. 



HOW TO BUILD. 

Our business is not to build quick- 
ly, but to build upon a right founda- 
tion and in a right spirit. Life is 
more than a mere competition as be- 
tween man and man ; it is not who 
can be done first, but who can work 
best; not who can rise highest, but 
who is working most patiently and 
lovingly in accordance with the de- 
signs of God. — Joseph Parker. 



WHAT WE GIVE UP. 

I used to think of what I would 
have to give up. I dearly loved many 
of the pleasures of this earth, but 
now I'd as soon go out into your 
streets and eat the dirt as do those 
things. God doesn't say, "Give up 
this and that." He says, "Here is 
the Son of my bosom — receive Him." 
When you do receive Him, everything 
else goes. Stop that talk about giv- 
ing up! Let Christ save you, and all 
these things go for nothing. — D. L. 
Moody. 



THE ETERNAL. 

Nothing is eternal but that which 
is done for God and for others. That 
which is done for self dies. Perhaps 
it is not wrong, but it perishes. You 
say it is pleasure — well, enjoy it. But 
joyous recollection is no longer joy. 
That which ends in self is mortal. 
That alone which goes out of self in- 
to God lasts forever. — Frederick W. 
Robertson. 



To do something for someone else; 
to love the unlovely; to give a hand 
to the unattractive; to speak to the 
uncongenial; to make friends with 
the poor and folks of lowly degree, 
to find a niche in the church of the 
Lord, and to do something out of 
sheer love for Him; to determine in 
His house to have his mind; to plan 
to win at least one for the Master; 
to aim to redeem past time that is 
lost; to will to let one's light shine; 
to cut off practices that are sinful 
and costly; to add the beauty of holi- 
ness — this is to make one's life a 
thing of beauty and this is to grow 
in grace, for growing in grace is sim- 
ply copying the beautiful life of the 
altogether lovely One. — Edward F. 
Reimer. 



We must get back to first princi- 
ples. We are right with God in the 
exact proportion that we are right 
with the men and women around us. 
Let us test ourselves, not by what we 
are on Sundays at church, but by 
what we are to the man whom we 
like least. That is the true gauge. — 
F. B. Meyer. 



The highest reaches of religious 
speculation and religious rapture will 
reach higher still when religion has 
been claimed by the commonest du- 
ties and the most sordid sufferings 
as their only strength and help. — 
Phillips Brooks. 



Just think of these four letters, 

next time you are ill. 

They represent good advice to sick 

women. 

Ladies, by thousands, hare writ- 
ten to tell others to "Take Wine of 

Car dux." 

They have tried it, and know 
what it will do for the ills and weak- 
nesses peculiar to their sex. 

Cardui, you must know, contains 
no injurious ingredients, hut is a 
pure, vegetable, non-intoxicating, ex- 
tract of medicinal herbs, which acts 
gently, specifically and curatively on 
the womanly organs. 

"I was a total wreck," writes Mrs. 
Eveline McGrew, of 2950 Guadalupe 
Street, Austin, Tex., "and I wish I 
could tell all afflicted females what 
Cardui has done for me and for my 
(laughters. It is certainly the best 
and most wonderful tonic, to build 
up shattered nerves and for all other 
female troubles. If all women and 
girls would use Cardui, they would 
not need doctors. It saved my life 
at the menopause and I recommend 
Cardui to all." 

Cardui is an old and well tried 
remedy for female troubles. , Your 
druggist sells it, with full directions 
for use on the wrapper. Try Cardui. 

THE GEM HOTEL 

The Only Strictly European 
Hotel in Charlotte. 
Formerly the Buford Annex, 19 South 

Tryon Street. 
Centrally Located, First-Class Dining 
Room and Lunch Room. Rooms 
With or Without Bath. 
E. F. CRESWELL, Manager. 



La Grippe 
Bad Colds 
Neuralgia 

Cured by using Johnson's 
Chill and Fever Tonic. 

The difference between 
a Bad Cold and La Grippe 
is this : 

A strong constitution 
will wear out a Cold, but 
Grippe will wear out a 
strong constitution. 

Don't take chances — 
take Johnson's Tonic. 

Made by The Johnson's 
Chill and Fever Tonic Co., 
Savannah, Ga. 

25 and 50 cent bottles. Trial 10 cent 
bottles sent on receipt of stamps. 



WANTED. 



Responsible man with horse and bug- 
gy in each community, salary $5.00 to 
J10.00 per day, to take orders from own- 
ers of Farms, Orchards, and Home Gar- 
dens. A splendid opportunity for far- 
mer's sons, also fruit tree and sewing 
machine agents, to make a business con- 
nection which will become more profita- 
ble each year. Address P. O. Box 670, 
Young's Island, S. C. 

TO DRIVE OUT MALARIA AND BUILD 
UP THE SYSTEM. 

Take the Old Standard Grove's Taste- 
less Chill Tonic. You know what you are 
taking. The formula is plainly printed 
on every bottle, showing It is simply 
Quinine and Iron In a tasteless form, 
and the moat effectual form. For grown 
people and children. 50c. 



I go to His cross to he in some 
measure a sharer of His suffering 
for others. ... In the death of 
self on the cross the new pain begins 
and so long as I remain here, the sor- 
row and sin of the world must press 
on my heart, for His life now holds 
and governs it. — G. Campbell Mor- 
gan. 



February 11, 1909. 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



9 



Our Little Folios. 



THE POSTMAN. 

The whistle of the postman 

Is a merry, cheery sound, 
We watch him from the window 

As he makes his daily round, 
And when our bell he jingles 

Then so very fast we run 
That over one another 

We go tumbling just for fun. 

Always upon our birthdays 

We are sure that he will call, 
And then beside the letters 

There's a package in the hall, 
It is tied with string and labeled 

So plain that all can see, 
"For Tommy, Jane, or Mary," 

Just as the case may be. 

O yes, we love the postman, 

And we like to stand and wait, 
In winter by the window 

And in summer by the gate. 
And we have all decided 

On the day called "Valentine," 
To ask the good old postman 

To come in with us and dine. 

— Josephine Canning. 



engrossing 



did- 



THEODORE MOTT'S VALENTINE. 

Theodore had been a sunny, happy, 
merry child until that dreadful, nev- 
er-to-be-forgotten day, when she fell 
on the ice and broke her leg and in- 
jured her back. Everything seemed 
to have gone wrong since that miser- 
able day. Her father had died, her 
mother had been ailing, and the mon- 
ey they once owned had "taken 
wings" — as money often does. Then, 
too, Theodora had grown worse in- 
stead of better. All day long she was 
obliged to lie in her small bed. 

Her mother sat busily engaged at 
a piece of drawn work, which she was 
making to order. Theodora had 
watched her mother until she was 
tired of seeing the ceaseless motion 
of the thin hands, then she turned 
over in bed where all she could see 
was the blank wall. 

Presently there was a rap at the 
door, and a little friend of Theodora's 
came in — a tiny girl only six years 
old — just half as old as Theodora. 
Her name was Bessie Harris. Theo- 
dora wiped her tears away, and turn- 
ed over to greet Bessie. 

"Did you know that today is St. 
Valentine's Day?" asked Bessie. 

"Yes." 

"Did you get a valentine?" 

"No," was the sober answer, "I 
never get valentines any more since 
— since — that dreadful day." 

"What dreadful day?" questioned 
Bessie, in surprise. 

"Oh, the day I was hurt — you know 
— I guess the girls and boys have all 
forgotten me." 

"I haven't" asserted Bessie, stout- 
ly. 

"No, you haven't, dear; you're a 
blessed girl — so you are. I know you 
love me, and I'm sure I love you." 

"If I had a valentine I'd have giv- 
en it to you," said Bessie; "but I had 
no money to buy one, and no one sent 
me one. I'm sorry." 

"You blessed dear!" Theodora said, 
with a little quiver of the voice. "I'm 
glad you thought of me — anyway." 

There was another tap at the door. 
This time it was a girl just The- 
odora's age, Clara. Hill. 

"Mamma sent me to see if the cen- 
ter piece could be finished by Fri- 
day?" she said to Mr. Mott. 

"It is nearly finished," was the an- 
swer. "I'm just taking the last stitch- 
es. If you can wait until I press it, 
you can take it right along with you." 

"I'll wait," was the answer, and 



Clara joined the other girls, whom 
she knew. 

Valentines was the all 
topic today with Bessie. 

"I suppose you got a valentine, 
n't you, Clara?" she asked. 

"Yes, I got three." 

"Oh, wasn't that nice," exclaimed 
Theodora; "please tell us all about 
them — were they all beautiful?" 

Clara laughed. 

"One was a regular caricature, but 
it was so ridiculously funny that I 
didn't care. Then the second one was 
pretty, most too silly to suit me — all 
about 'roses red and violets blue, the 
pink is pretty and so are you,' and 
such nonsense. But the third one 
was beautiful, the most beautiful one 
I ever got. I don't know who sent it, 
but it's a treasure. I just love it." 

Her eyes shone with the joy of the 
thought of her treasure. 

"Tell us about it, please," begged 
Theodora — "did it have little angels 
flying about?" 

"Oh, yes, angels or cupids, and 
flowers and birds, and it shines as 
if sprinkled with silver and gold." 

"Oh!" exclaimed Theodora, folding 
her hands together and looking up 
longingly, "I wish I could see it." 

"Well, then, my dear, you shall see 
it," responding at once to the wish; 
"I'll run home and get it right away." 

"Oh, please don't; I didn't mean — ■" 
began Theodora, in protest; but Clara 
did not heed. 

She ran home for her valentines, 
all three of them; but before wra- 
pping them up she looked fondly at 
the beautiful one; even pressing the 
"perfumed flowers to her lips. 

"I want it myself; oh I do," she 
said longingly; "but I'm not a selfish 
pig, I hope — I am a 'King's Daughter.' 
Theodora shall have it, so she shall! 
Poor little dear — with her pale face 
and aching leg! I wouldn't keep this 
valentine for anything!" Kissing it 
once more — this time a farewell — she 
put it gently in the lace-bordered box, 
and hurried off. 

Theodora laughed until she cried 
when she saw the comic valentine, 
and smiled at the sentimental one, 
but her face grew radiant over the 
beautiful one. 

Meanwhile Clara paid Mrs. Mott 
for the drawn-work center piece. 
Then she took the valentines, number 
one and number two; leaving number 
three with Theodora, who looked sur- 
prised. 

"It's yours," she said, simply, 
"goodbye! " — Ex. 



less persecutor of the Christians, and 
by his order the bishop was behead- 
ed. The date of his death was Feb- 
ruary 14, A. D. 270. We find the state- 
ment in Archbishop Wneatley's "Il- 
lustrations of the Book of Common 
Prayer" that "St. Valentine was a 
man of admirable parts, and so fa- 
mous for his love and charity that 
the custom of choosing valentines up- 
on his festival took its rise from 
thence." But probably the connec- 
tion of name is wholly due to a co- 
incidence of date. When the saint's 
name was- placed in the church cal- 
endar, the day of his death was made 
a festival, to offset that of the Luper- 
calia, on the 15th. In Allen Butler's 
"Lives of the Saints" we read that 
the zealous Christian fathers tried to 
substitute the names of saints for 
those of girls in the lottery game, 
but without success. So the "valen- 
tine" custom spread from Rome 
through Europe to Great Britain, al- 
ways in high favor, and later, in the 
form of sending tender missives, 
came to America, and down to the 
present time. — February Housekeep- 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 

The mid-April afternoon was love- 
ly as only Washington in April knows 
how to be. It was warm and bright 
and blossomy, and the Potomac shone 
in the sun like silver, the willows 
along its banks were like soft, green 
plumes, the lilacs in the parks were 
out in white and purple splendor. 
The President and Mrs. Lincoln were 
going for a drive. 

"To the Soldier's Home, Burke," 
said the President, as he stepped into 
the carriage. And over the old, famil- 
iar way to the Soldier's Home they 
went, drinking in the balmy air and 
delighting in the gay buntings that 
draped dwellings and business houses 
and government buildings in honor 
of this long-prayed-for peace that was 
so near at hand. 

"We've had four hard years, Mary," 
the big, tender, whimsical man said 
to the little woman at his side — -"four 
awful hard years. And I hardly dare 
to hope the four we're facing will be 
very easy. But when we're through 
here we'll not be old. I'll only be 
sixty and ought to have some go left 
in me. And we've saved some money 
— -we'll save some more. Then we'll 
settle down in Chicago or in Spring- 
field, and I'll practice law, and we'll 
live quietly and cozily, to a nice 
green old age. Doesn't that sound 
good to you?'' 

His rugged face was full of tender- 
ness as he spoke, and of wistfulness 
— wistfulness of a tired man for the 
the sweets of simple living. — Sel. 



THE ORIGIN OF VALENTINES. 

A fact in natural history, to wit, 
that birds in Southern Europe pair 
about the middle of February, is said 
to have inspired a custom of the an- 
cient Romans, to which the origin 
of the modern valentine can undoubt- 
edly be traced. At the feast of the 
Lupercalia, held in honor of the great 
god Pan, the names of the virgin 
duaghters of Rome were put in a box 
and drawn therefrom by the young 
men. Each youth was bound to offer 
a gift to the maiden who fell to his 
lot, and to make her his partner dur- 
ing the time of the feast. How this 
secular custom became allied to the 
name of a saint is altogether a differ- 
ent matter. St. Valentine was a bish- 
op of Rome during the third century, 
He is said to have been a man of 
very amiable nature, and most elo- 
quent of speech, wherefore he was 
very successful in converting the pa- 
gan Romans to Christianity. Marcus 
Aurejius w s then Emperor, a relent- 



Too much of our religion is up in 
the air. It consists of rhapsodies 
and emotions, rather than downright, 
every-day religion and exertion. Re- 
ligion should have wings, it is true; 
but it equally should have hands and 
feet and tongue. Only the creed 
translated into deed is of any impor- 
tance for either world. — Ellis. 



Flatter not thyself in thy faith to 
God if thou wantest charity for thy 
neighbor; and think not thou hast 
charity for thy neighbor if thou want- 
est faith to God. Where they are not 
both together, they are both wanting 
— they are both dead if once divid- 
ed. — Quarles. 



Another Delicious 

Sunday Dessert. 

For your Sunday dinner make 
this delightful 

O Dessert. 

PRUNE SOUFFLE. 

Slake one pint stewed 
prune pulp. Dissolve 
one package Chocolate 
Jell-O in one pint 
boiling water; when it 
begins to thicken add 
the prune pulp and 
one teaspoonful cinna- 
mon, and beat into 
one cup whipped 
cream. Pile into cus- 
tard cups and serve 
with whipped cream. 

Every member of 
the family will be 
delighted with this dish. 

Seven flavors of Jell-O, 10c. each, 
at grocers. 

Illustrated Recipe Book, Free, 
The Genesee Pure Food Co., Le Roy, N. Y. 




Every yielding to temptation weak- 
ens the power of resistance. Some 
portion of strength goes with every 
indulgence. When resistance be- 
comes a habit the stronghold of the 
tempter is overthrown. — Selected. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY. 

N. B. — Following schedule figures pub- 
lished only as Information, and are not 

gua ran teed: 

10:18 p. m.— No. 38, daily, New York and 
New Orleans Limited, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Pullman draw- 
ing room sleeping cars, observation, 
and club cars to New York. 

3:45 a. m. — No. 45, daily. Local for Char- 
lotte, connecting for Atlanta and 
points south. 

4:10 a. m. — No. 30, daily, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles sleep- 
er for New York. 
12:45 a. m.— No. 112, daily, for Raleigh 
and Goldsboro. This train handles 
Pullman sleeper from Greensboro to 
RaWyh. 

7:10 a. m.— No. 8, daily, for DanvllU 

and Richmond. 

8:15 a. m.— No. 237, daily, for Winston- 
Salem and daily except Sunday for 
Wilkesboro. 

7:50 a. m. — No. 154, daily except Sunday, 
for Ramseur. 

7:20 a. m. — No. 37, daily, Washington 
and Southwestern Limited. Pullman 
drawing room sleeping cars, observa- 
tion and club cars New York to New 
Orleans. Pullman drawing room 
sleeping car New York to Atlanta. 
Solid Pullman train. Dining car ser- 
vice. 

7:50 a. m. — No. 11, daily for Charlott* 

and Atlanta, connecting for Asheville 
and Knoxville. 

9:25 a. m. — No. 44, daily, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles day 
coaches Atlanta to Washington. 

9:25 a. m. — No. 144, daily, for Durham, 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. 

1:15 p. m. — No. 36, daily, for Washing- 
ton and points north. Handles Pull- 
man drawing room sleeper New Or- 
leans to New York. Pullman drawing 
room sleeper Birmingham to Rich- 
mond, Va., and day coaches to Wash- 
ington. Dining car service. 
12:30 p. m.— No. 21, daily, for Salisbury 
and Asheville. Handles parlor car to 
Asheville. 

12:55 p. m. — No. 7, daily, local train for 
Charlotte. 

2:20 p. m. — No. 207, dally except Sunday, 
for Winston-Salem, making connec- 
tions for Wilkesboro. 
12:50 p. m. — No. 130, daily, for Sanford 
and intermediate points. Through for 
Fayetteville and Wilmington. 

3:20 p. m. — No. 22, dally, for Durham, 
Raleigh and Goldsboro. Handles par- 
lor car to Goldsboro. 

2:30 p. rn. — No. 151, daily except Sunday, 
for Madison. 

3:30 p. m. — No. 230, daily except Sunday, 
for Ramseur. 

4:55 p. m.— No. 131. dally, for Mt. Airy. 

6.15 p. m. — No. 35, daily, for Atlanta and 
joints south. Pullman drawing room 
sleepers to New Orleans and Bir- 
mingham. Day coaches to New Or- 
leans. Dining car service. 

6:35 p. m. — No. 235, daily, for Winston- 
Salem. 

12:20 a. m.— No. 29, dally, for Columbia, 
Savannah and Jacksonville. Pullman 
drawing room sleeper and coach to 
Jacksonville. Dining car service. 

10:20 p. m. — No. 233, daily for Winston- 
Salem. 

9:35 p. m. — No. 12, dally, for Richmond 
and local points. Handles sleeper for 
Richmond. 

C. H. ACKERT, V. P. & G. M. 
S. H. HARDWICK, P. T. M. 
W. H. TAYLOE, G. P. A., 

Washington, D. C. 
R. L. VERNON, T. P. A., 

Charlotte, N. C. 
R. H. DeBUTTS. P. & T. A., 

Greensboro, N. C. 



FROST PROOF Ss. E 

GUARANTEED TO SATISFY PURCHASERS 

Price: 1,000 to 5,000 at $1.50 per 1,000, 
5,000 to 9,000 at $1.25 per 1,000; 10,000 
and over at $1.00 per 1,000. Our cata- 
logue gives full instructions for grow- 
ing all kinds of fruits and vegetables, 
and mailed on request. Wm. C. GER- 
ATY CO., The Cabbage Plant Men, P. O. 
Box, 670, Young's Island, S. C. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



February 11, 1909. 



Woman s F. M. Society. 

Conducted by Mr». L. W. Crawford, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



UNEARNED. 

If one should come to me and kindly 
say, 

"There Is much love and peace in 
paradise; 

No mortal passes through its por- 
tal twice, 

But I will let you enter in today." 

Then, were I true at heart, I'd turn 
away, 

Knowing I had paid no entrance 
price, 

Borne no hard cross, and made no 
sacrifice — 
My hours all flown in song and dream 
and play. 

But all the yearning love that under- 
lay 

The Voice that spake to me para- 
dise 

Would flood my being, for my need 
suffice, 

And overflow to others by the way, 
So for the weak, the anguished, and 
the stray 
I would be strong in help and sacri- 
fice, 

That when in service I had paid the 
price 

All these with me might enter in — 
some day. 

— Maude Lutton. 



BY WAY OF EXHORTATION. 

Conf. Cor. Sec. 
The thirty-first annual session of 
the Woman's Board of Foreign Mis- 
sions will be held in Chattanooga, 
Tenn., beginning Saturday, May 1, 
1909. 



The Western North Carolina Con- 
ference Society will hold its annual 
session this year in Mt. Airy. The 
exact date has not been fixed, but it 
will be as early in June as possible, 
probably the first week, beginning 
about June 3. 



At a much earlier date than this 
the story of the year's triumphs (we 
will not say failures) will have been 
told. The conference treasurer will 
hold her books open till after the 
monthly meetings in March, but even 
with these few days of grace, but lit- 
tle time is left for the winding up of 
affairs. 

Many are the hearts, loyal and true, 
that are beating in anxiety at this 
crucial stage of the work. We have 
had faith to attempt great things for 
God — have we had the corresponding 
life and energy to bring them to pass? 
With but few exceptions we all cer- 
tainly meant to do better in every 
way this year than we did last, but 
time slips by so fast, and now, at the 
last minute neglected dues, confer- 
ence expense fund and pledge are all 
crowding upon us. What are we go- 
ing to do about it? 

Let no one think that she can fall 
behind, and it will matter little or 
nothing. Where so much is involved, 
not one can afford to do less than her 
very best. What if it strains you, 
my sister, beyond measure to do now 
what you might have done systemat- 
ically with ease! Think what it 
means if just you fall short— how far- 
reaching the result will be. It means 
that your society will fail to do what 
your district secretary has asked and 
is expecting; it means, consequently, 
that your conference society will not 
reach its goal; that thereby the Wo- 
man's Board will be limited in its 
operations. Yea, more. It may mean 
that some poor soul famishing for the 
bread of life will be unfed, and the 
heart of the blessed Savior wounded 
afresh, 



"I will not be negligent to put you 
in remembrance of these things, 
though ye know them. . . . Yea, I 
think it meet to stir you up by put- 
ting you in remembrance." II Peter, 
1, 12, 13. 



And then there is the little love gift 
that was asked for at the Christmas 
tide — the extra gift so sorely needed 
to relieve the board of financial em- 
barrassment. The conference treas- 
urer has as yet received but a small 
amount of this Christmas offering. 
Perhaps many local treasurers are 
holding it till the close of the quar- 
ter. Surely it cannot be that any one 
deliberately refused the King so small 
a gift. Probably in the rush of Christ- 
mas preparation and the fullness of 
Christmas joy, the letter was laid 
aside — forgotten — not even read. Or 
perhaps the little envelope was lost, 
or it has simply been neglected. Too 
late to send it? No, it is still eager- 
ly £.nd anxiously expected. 

"This second epistle, beloved, I now 
write unto you: in both of which I 
stir up your pure minds by way of re- 
membrance." — II Peter 3, 1. 



WHAT MRS. COBB THINKS OF 
THE HOME FIELD. 

Wherever I have been in the home 
field I have noted the signs of prog- 
ress, the increase of knowledge, a de- 
sire for information, the deepening of 
spiritual life. Our women are begin- 
ning to learn something of the bles- 
sedness of giving and the joy of liv- 
ing close to Christ. In many of the 
conferences the pledges for another 
year have gone beyond the amount 
asked for. This was notably the case 
in South Carolina. Last year the 
pledge raised was $6,000. This year 
the prayer had been for $10,000. The 
cards were distributed, prayer offered, 
and the result was $11,850, which was 
afterwards increased to over $12,000. 
This liberal response was in a great 
measure, due to the fact that every 
district conference had had the in- 
spiration of the presence and wise 
counsel of Mrs. Wightman and Mrs. 
Humbert. Much is gained from let- 
ters by conference officers, but these 
cannot take the place of a face-to-face 
talk. 

One conference secretary writes 
that her "delegates went home deeply 
interested in the work, which is bet- 
ter than being simply enthusiastic." 
They propose to go beyond their past 
record. I believe that each of the 
conferences pledged by faith a larger 
amount than was raised last year. 

Several auxiliaries that had been 
helping to support a missionary now 
have their own individual mission- 
ary to bind them more closely to the 
work. Many women who have been 
giving five or ten dollars to the pledge 
have increased their subscriptions to 
fifteen, twenty, and twenty-five dol- 
lars; one teach is giving fifty dollars, 
and one blessed woman is giving fif- 
ty dollars each month. Surely we 
are growing in grace, if giving is any 
evidence of it. And it behooves us 
to enter into larger fields, for the 
work at every foreign station is grow- 
ing. Building has to be done at ev- 
ery station in Korea, land paid for at 
Wonson and at Davidson Memorial, 
Soochow, China, and we are compell- 
ed to largely increase our contribu- 
tions and freewill offerings in order 
to meet the conditions not only in 
China and Korea, but in the other 
fields where we have workers. Shall 
we not make a prayerful effort to go 

(Concluded on Page Eleven) . 




FOR 




HINTING 




WILL RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION 



We are prepared to take care of 
any job from a visiting card to the 
largest poster or pamphlet. We 
have just installed one of the very 
latest, up-to-date two-revolution 
presses, which is equipped for the 
most delicate half-tone work. In 
addition we have a full supply of 
the latest faces of type. Our press- 
es and type being new we can as- 
sure neat and attractive display. 



OUR SPECIALTIES 

Visiting Cards, Envelopes, Letter Heads 
Report Blanks, Bill Heads, Invitations, 
Announcements, Programs, Circulars, &c 



Christian Advocate Pub. Co. 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 



February 11, 1909. 



NOKTH CAEOLINA CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE. 



11 



Woman s H. M. Society. 

Mr*. W. L. NichoUon, Editor, Charlotte, N. C. 



"SHINE WHERE YOU ARE." 

"Don't waste your time in longing, 

For bright, impossible things; 
Don't sit supinely yearning 

For the swiftness of angel wings; 
Don't spurn to be a rushlight, 

Because you're not a star; 
But brighten some bit of darkness 

By shining just where you are. 
There is need of the tiniest candle, 

As well as the garish sun; 
The humblest deed is ennobled 

When it is worthily done. 
You may never be called to brighten 

The darkened regions afar; 
So fill for the day, your mission 

By shining just where you are." 
* * * 

The editor convalesces slowly, but 
we hope, surely, and you are to exer- 
cise the grace of Patience while I 
"fill in" some more. 

* * * 

I hope each and every one will read 
"Methodism in Transylvania" by Rev. 
R. G. Tuttle in last week's Advocate. 
If you overlooked it, be sure and get 
the Advocate of February 4th and 
read it. Comment is unnecessary. 

* * * 

Also did you read the letter publish- 
ed in an Advocate of recent date from 
the presiding elder of the Shelby dis- 
trict? Comment here is unnecessary. 
But one does not feel to say in the 
words of another, "May his tribe in- 
crease." 

* * * 

I cannot forbear to again call at- 
tention to the fact that our finances 
must all be in shape and reports sent, 
in less than a month's time. 

Remember $1.45 plus $1.00, as our 
average per member. 

And 'tis for the King! 

* * * 

The Annual Meeting will embrace 
the second Sunday in May. The good 
Concord folks are so cordial in their 
expressions of hospitality that al- 
ready one feels not a delegate to be 
entertained, but a friend to be wel- 
comed. Very soon exact - dates, pro- 
gram, etc., will be given in these col- 
umns. 

* * * 

This editor and printer man have 
been so kind and forbearing during 
my "filling in" time that I could not 
dare to see mistakes. But at least, 
'tis to laugh when last week they 
made me say over and over again 
"Execution meeting" instead of Exec- 
tive meeting. "What's in a name?" 
Perhaps one may slay as certainly as 
another. 

* * * 

Have you noticed that February is 
to be "Advocate month" in the West- 
ern North Carolina Conference? 
Won't you members of the Home Mis- 
sion constituency remember that and 
urge members to subscribe? This is 
church work of the most practical 
and far-reaching kind. Let no one 
ever say "There is nothing for me to 
do" while there is a single member 
who does not subscribe for and read 
the Advocate. 

* * * 

This is Election Month. Let no 
auxiliary meet unprepared. You will 
recall that board indorses the nomina- 
ting committee in preference to the 
nominating ballot. It will be a very 
easy matter for officers to find out 
the duties, privileges and limitationss 
of a nominating committee and let all 
be done in some semblance of accord 
to parliamentary usages. Please do 
not delay sending list of new officers. 
This is of vital importance. 



Friends, you won't plan to be so 
busy in February sewing for next 
summer that you will have no time 
left to do this work will you? When 
thought of from some standpoints one 
would almost fear to plan one's work 
that way, remembering how it was 
said, "This night shall thy soul be 
required of thee." But not for fear 
would we give of our time, no dear 
Lord, for gratitude, for very love, we 
will reserve much of this especial 
month for thy service. 



WHY REPORT? 

"Modesty is a beautiful virtue and 
no fault is to be found with the wo- 
man who quietly slips her report of 
"visits made", garments given away," 
etc., into her First Vice-President's 
hand and lets no one be the "wiser as 
to her share in the work; but when 
she fails altogether to report she in- 
jures the cause she would help. A 
good report encourages the Auxilia- 
ries, the conference, and helps to 
swell the grand total at the annual 
meeting, which tells whether our wo- 
men are awake or not. Let reporting 
faithfully be your purpose." 

The above note from the February 
Bulletin should be read by every aux- 
iliary member and officer. 

MRS. T. J. COPELAND. 

Woman's F. M. Society 

(Continued From Page 10) 

beyond the $200,000 asked for by Mrs. 
McTyire, the general treasurer. 

If our women could but be made to 
realize their obligation to God, to the 
heathen, and to themselves, the 
money would pour into the coffers of 
the church, and many uninterested 
women would become enlisted in the 
cause of missions. 



"Rise, for the day is passing, 

And you lie dreaming on; 
The others have buckled their armor, 

And forth to the fight have gone. 
A place in the ranks awaits you, 

Each one has some part to play; 
The past and the future are nothing 

In the face of the stern today." 



Progress of a Severe Case of Tetter. 
Guntersville, Ala., July 14, 1908. 
Dr. J. T. Shuptrine, Savannah, Ga. 

Dear Sir: — I am glad to say that three 
or four boxes of Tetterine I ordered of 
you, I have personally used, have given 
me more relief and seemingly a perma- 
nent cure of Tetter and Eczema than I 
have had for 25 years, for which time I 
have been tortured and tormented, with 
some dreadful skin disease on my thighs 
and in my groins, also on my left hand, 
and had as I thought destroyed the nat- 
ural growth of two of my finger nails. 
I now have one of them absolutely cured 
and looking as natural as I could ask for. 
The other one very much improved. I 
also had it on my feet and they are cured. 
In the twenty-five or thirty years I have 
been embarrassed and tortured with skin 
trouble I have consulted and taken medi- 
cine from many doctors, and bought and 
used many different kinds of ointments, 
but none gave me relief and satisfaction 
as your Tetterine has given me. I would 
not have had my two finger nails just 
as they were for $100.00. Respectfully, 
J. D. Chandler. 

Tetterine cures Eczema, Tetter, Ring 
Worm, Ground Itch, Infant's Sore Head, 
Pimples, Boils, Rough Scaly Patches on 
the Face, Old Itching Sores, Dandruff, 
Cankered Scalp, Bunions, Corns, Chil- 
blains, and every form of Skin Disease. 
Tetterine, 50c; Tetterine Soap, 25c. Tour 
druggist, or by mail from the manufac- 
turer. The Shuptrine Co., Savannah, Ga. 



That time is the worst employed 
which we give up to regrets, unless 
we learn from them lessons for the 
future. — Due de Levis. 



The Best Fertilizers for Corn 

That the yield of corn from the average farm can be greatly in- 
creased by intelligent and liberal fertilization has been repeatedly 
demonstrated. Large crops of good corn result from preparing the 
land well, using the right kind and quantity of fertilizer, good seed 
and proper cultivation. 

Virginia- Carolina 
Fertilizers 

will greatly " increase your yield per acre " of corn or any other crop. 
In some cases remarkable results have been obtained. 

Mr. C. W. Caruthers of Sumpter County, Fla., writes : "Words 
cannot express the value of your fertilizer. It is really so far ahead 
of other companies' goods, that it would not pay anyone to use other 
brands, we